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View Full Version : Rev Run interview.


brown_dogg
10-16-2005, 05:57 PM
he talks about his upcoming album, a new tv show, and his church work.



IGN Music: What's happening?

Rev Run: What's it look like when you're on the mic?

IGN Music: I wouldn't know since I leave rhyming to professionals such as yourself. Speaking of which, you've got a lot of things popping off right now, a new album, a television show, your work at the church…

Run: Right! I heard a man once say "Your life is speaking so loud I can't hear nuthin' you're sayin'." So my life is going to be pretty loud very soon and people are gonna see my actions of how I raise my family and work with my brother Russell Simmons, and running Run Athletics, which is the maker of Phat Farm Footwear and the new Arthur Ash sneaker.

IGN Music: So since the television show is the big new thing for you, kind of a departure from the whole rap game, can you break down what we can expect from it?

Run: The show opens up with me doing a "Word of Wisdom." I wake up in the morning, get in my tub and start writing from my Blackberry some words of wisdom and send them out to people like Kid Rock, Serena Williams, LL Cool J, Puffy, and people kind of share the words and pass 'em around. Then my day starts working with my five children and my wife and they show some zany stuff that happens there. Then at the end I do my "Word of Wisdom" again and it kind of sums up the show.

IGN Music: What's happening?

Rev Run: What's it look like when you're on the mic?

IGN Music: I wouldn't know since I leave rhyming to professionals such as yourself. Speaking of which, you've got a lot of things popping off right now, a new album, a television show, your work at the church…

Run: Right! I heard a man once say "Your life is speaking so loud I can't hear nuthin' you're sayin'." So my life is going to be pretty loud very soon and people are gonna see my actions of how I raise my family and work with my brother Russell Simmons, and running Run Athletics, which is the maker of Phat Farm Footwear and the new Arthur Ash sneaker.

IGN Music: So since the television show is the big new thing for you, kind of a departure from the whole rap game, can you break down what we can expect from it?

Run: The show opens up with me doing a "Word of Wisdom." I wake up in the morning, get in my tub and start writing from my Blackberry some words of wisdom and send them out to people like Kid Rock, Serena Williams, LL Cool J, Puffy, and people kind of share the words and pass 'em around. Then my day starts working with my five children and my wife and they show some zany stuff that happens there. Then at the end I do my "Word of Wisdom" again and it kind of sums up the show.

IGN Music: It almost sounds like you're more of a deacon, in a sense.

Run: Yeah, but I'm a real minister. I guess you could call it a kind of "New Age" type of thing. When you see my show it will definitely be ministering to people.

IGN Music: I'm a bit curious, since this spiritual side of you has become really prominent in the past several years, do you feel any conflict still participating in what I would call the "secular" world of rap music?

Run: Well, it's almost like George Forman going out there knockin' people out still. God gave me a talent to rap and I'm just a rapper by trade. It's like if a plumber becomes born again he doesn't use a bible to fix the sink. He still remembers how to connect the pipes. In a way God didn't call me to become a Christian rapper because that would be too small. It's like "Okay, I was the King of Rap, but now I only rap about one subject." Instead I rap about many subjects and it's positive stuff and that's the deal.

IGN Music: So then you don't feel any conflict between your religious affirmations and the often more materialistic drive of the music industry? You know how Al Green gave up singing secular music when he found God because he felt the two were at odds with one another?

Run: I have no conflict with it and God has no conflict with it. I am here to inspire. And my new television show and the new album are right in time with what God is calling me to do as a Reverend.

IGN Music: Speaking of the album, I'm kind of tripping on the fact that it's just you solo along with a new, virtually unknown producer named White Boy.

Run: I picked an unknown because I wanted to make the album myself. I didn't need any ego in the studio. White Boy respected all the Run DMC stuff he heard over the years and he let me be me. He kind of helped me sort out what I needed, helped with the drum machines and the different samples that I needed. We kind of had a chemistry when we got in the studio. He kind of let me do me. It's a real Run DMC sounding album. I would call this record very "Runnish." When you listen to it it doesn't sound like anything new. It doesn't sound like 50 Cent or Jay-Z, it sounds like Run. Vintage Run, Tougher Than Leather, Raisin' Hell, in that vein. It's really some—I wouldn't call it Old School, but it's vintage Run.

IGN Music: Which is what is totally tripping me out. The last album, Crown Royal, seemed to be all about the guest appearances from Kid Rock, Sugar Ray, the whole nine. And this is totally different, stripped down.

Run: Well I'm in a good space right now. I was able to discern what I was supposed to do, so I just went and made a record that sounds like Run DMC compared to when Clive Davis was pushing me in a Santana [Supernatural]-type direction and then I was left there with L.A. Reid with an album that Clive had started and that was, in his mind, the way Santana had a bunch of collaborations and it was fun, the idea, and Clive giving me that attention was special to me, but I won't say it was my best creative effort.

IGN Music: Then is it safe to say that Distortion is more of an album that you personally wanted to make?

Run: I'll go for that. I wanted to make Crown Royal, too. It was an opportunity to have the spotlight on me, so I was happy to do it. But this one is better, I would say. A better effort and pure. It's all a journey for me. I had a very, very big time during the '80s. The beginning of the '90s kind of cooled off the way things do. I believe I will be making a magnificent splash back to the game as a solo artist.

IGN Music: Which brings up the next obvious question: is it at all strange to now be a solo artist and making music with either Jay or Darryl?

Run: Not strange at all. I had a good time making the record with White Boy and I'm working with my family on the television show, so everything is kind of in order in my mind. It's beautiful, I'm having a good time. Plus I'm not performing, so it's really not strange at all.

IGN Music: You said something interesting a few moments ago when describing the style of the album. You said that it was "vintage Run." What prompted you to go "You know what, I'm not even gonna try to come with some new style. I'm just gonna stick with what I know best."?

Run: I got the courage from the Holy Ghost. God directed me to make an album that sounds like myself. And that's where the confidence came from, through the prayer and guidance of the Holy Ghost who showed me through many dreams and people and things and signs, telling me to "Just go for it. Do what you do. Ask no kids about nothing. Don't ask the youth a thing. Don't put one artist on this album outside of yourself. You have the game plan. You have the power. Look at all the critics and what they say about Raisin' Hell. Look what they say about Tougher Than Leather. Make that. It's time to make that. It's time to make those same records. This is the time." God directed me that way and once I got that direction I made 10 songs in 10 days and then mixed it over a month-and-some-change, but it was very simple to make once I got clear communication from the Heavens that it was time to make a Run sounding album. Rather than taking directions from the kids. Rather than going with Timbaland and having him tell me how to make a Run DMC album. Rather than going to Pharrell and sayin' "Help me." Rather than goin' to somebody else, let me do Run. I know how to do Run best.

So it was like "C'mon White Boy, me and you will do it. Here's what I want you to do. Sample this, do that." Then he'd say "I got this idea Run…" And I'd be like "Okay, throw that scratch in there, too, but stay on this course. We're makin' a record that sounds like this, smells like Run, smells like Raisin' Hell, smells like a little Beastie Boys the way they produced Licensed To Ill, smells like a little Rick Rubinish/Russell Simmons Krush Groove era." I got in that mode and stayed in that circle and didn't care what date I was in, which was 2005. Yet I was caught up in making a record that sounded exactly like me. That confidence came from God who said "It's okay. Don't look back. Keep makin' this record. No, you don't need no help. Yes, use that old snare drum. Yes, used those claps. Rhyme like that. You're gonna shock 'em Run. Don't even look to the left. Don't play it for Russell yet. No, don't play it for Def Jam. Don't play it for L.A. Reid yet. Now you're up to nine songs? Okay, play it now." [The reaction was] "Oh my God! What the hell is this Run!? It sounds like vintage Run DMC." Then I was like "Okay, I've got one more song to make. It's called "Distortion." And then it was "What the hell are you doing!? It's a masterpiece!" And that's the whole story.


source ign.com