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noel411
01-19-2012, 07:12 PM
do you think African American people in general will look back on hip hop as we know it today with shame, pride, or a mixture of both?

theheavens
01-19-2012, 07:59 PM
hip hop is an art form. what the fuck is there to be ashamed of? when Time magazine puts "C.R.E.A.M." on its list of the 100 greatest songs of all time, alongside "Strange Fruit" by Billie Holiday, I think it's safe to say it's a legit art form.

b-dolo
01-19-2012, 08:06 PM
I can see in the near future where rap ends up like blues/jazz music. Something that is not mainstream, but only followed by a certain small percentage of the population that appreciates it as an art form. I guess it wont be so bad, since it will weed out of a lot the bullshit, and only true artists will be left.

OntheHorizon
01-19-2012, 08:09 PM
The Same way we look back at shit that was popular in 1912

Prime8
01-19-2012, 08:09 PM
I think the whole "I'm in the club drinking and dancing" style hip-hop will be looked back on like Bubblegum Pop is.

check two
01-19-2012, 08:13 PM
Anything involving grills, funny looking flat brim hats, terrible music such as Waka Flaka, fat white girls, rims, etc. will be looked back on as an embarassment.

ShaDynasty
01-19-2012, 08:16 PM
100 years from now whatever genres exist, there will be some shit to be ashamed of. theres always someone cooning, and its not always a race issue. not sure why you'd be ashamed of a whole genre though. theres good music and bad music. people still play cole porter, nat king cole whoever the fuck else from years ago or even classical music.

hip hop may actually be more revered in the future.

Prime8
01-20-2012, 11:33 AM
The thing about hip-hop is that it can incorporate elements of any genre a lot easier than any other genre. It'll continue to expand with new and more innovative sounds. I could see a rise in the amount of beats with a layered orchestral sound, a little like those on MBDTF.

june181972
01-21-2012, 11:51 AM
do you think African American people in general will look back on hip hop as we know it today with shame, pride, or a mixture of both?

Interesting question (no sarcasm)
First off, any Black person that calls themselves "African-American" probably doesn't have a good grasp of history, or language for that matter.
With that being said, one must first recognize the context of Black people even being in America; and also consider the law of cause and effect.
Pride in the entrepreneurial drive and spirit.
Pride in the more intelligent and informative lyrics.
Pride in the genesis of hip-hop, and it as an art form in general.

One cannot simply be "ashamed" of "gangster rap" without understanding the cause and effects of the crack epidemic.

As for the "bling/in the club" that's a musical climate created by the industry more so than the artist.

So-called "African-Americans" may have created the hip-hop genre and lifestyle, but have had a diminishing influence on how it has been presented to the public over the years.

ShaDynasty
01-22-2012, 10:03 AM
As for the "bling/in the club" that's a musical climate created by the industry more so than the artist.

there are clubs. artists make music for people to dance to. they'd do it regardless if the industry wants them to. through the years you had swing jazz, rock and roll, disco, house etc. people don't wanna hear talib fucking kwali when they're grinding on a chick.

the shine is for showing haters that you made some money, its sometimes tasteless and childish, but thats people for you.

also how is 'black' a more accurate term than 'african american' neither term really means shit.

muscularghandi
01-22-2012, 10:21 AM
Hardcore underground Hip-Hop will be looked at like Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious monk and those guys.

The mainstream stuff will be looked at as classic by some, others will look at it as "bubble gum" like a lot of the later swing stuff.

june181972
01-23-2012, 07:17 PM
there are clubs. artists make music for people to dance to. they'd do it regardless if the industry wants them to. through the years you had swing jazz, rock and roll, disco, house etc. people don't wanna hear talib fucking kwali when they're grinding on a chick.
There is always an industry paradigm that an artist must conform to if they desire a certain level of commercial (financial) success. If a club/dj is playing hip-hop, then they are more than likely to play what is "hot" which is synonymous to what is getting played on the radio.
the shine is for showing haters that you made some money, its sometimes tasteless and childish, but thats people for you.
Black people from poverty, which is what many rappers are, like to show off any level of wealth that they attain. There is a historic and socio-economic context to this phenomena, as it pertains to Blacks in America, that is bigger than hip-hop.
also how is 'black' a more accurate term than 'african american' neither term really means shit.
Words mean a lot, and there is a lot in a name. Slaves were given the surname of their master as a sign of ownership. Calling oneself an "African-American" is again re-naming yourself after 2 white guys.

ShaDynasty
01-23-2012, 08:34 PM
There is always an industry paradigm that an artist must conform to if they desire a certain level of commercial (financial) success. If a club/dj is playing hip-hop, then they are more than likely to play what is "hot" which is synonymous to what is getting played on the radio.

yeah theres probably some artists that are put in a spot where they have to conform, but i think if you gave the majority of them (waka flocka, puffy, TI etc) the choice they'd continue making dance music.

Black people from poverty, which is what many rappers are, like to show off any level of wealth that they attain. There is a historic and socio-economic context to this phenomena, as it pertains to Blacks in America, that is bigger than hip-hop.

so how is it created by the industry?

Words mean a lot, and there is a lot in a name. Slaves were given the surname of their master as a sign of ownership. Calling oneself an "African-American" is again re-naming yourself after 2 white guys.

seen the film malcolm x? where a dude breaks down why 'black' is a negative term? to stop this problem blacks should come up with a new name for their race, maybe melaninican?

june181972
01-23-2012, 09:57 PM
yeah theres probably some artists that are put in a spot where they have to conform, but i think if you gave the majority of them (waka flocka, puffy, TI etc) the choice they'd continue making dance music.
I think their motivation behind any choice they make is monetary first and foremost.
P.S.: Good for them, I'm not a hater.


so how is it created by the industry?
I think anything hip-hop, particularly and increasingly over the last 20 years, that is put out there for the public to consume, is very heavily manipulated by the industry. Pardon me if I singled out that 1 particular style.

seen the film malcolm x? where a dude breaks down why 'black' is a negative term? to stop this problem blacks should come up with a new name for their race, maybe melaninican?
SMH
You missed the entire point of that scene.
The other "dude," Brother Baines, (who is 100% fictional, read the actual Autobiography) tells Malcolm to read the definitions of black and white. Malcolm sees how white is defined as good and black is defined as other than good.

Malcolm responds: "This is written by white folks right? So why are we reading it anyway?"

Brother Baines: "The truth is right there, you have to read between the lines"

You bringing up the Malcolm X movie is actually another good example of how the different forms of media are manipulated to effect the consumers perception.
The "dude" that actually introduced Malcolm to the NOI was his blood brother. Why the need to change that fact, among many others in the movie? Read between the lines.

main_man
01-24-2012, 03:06 AM
apparently, admiral krumple will still be relevant 100 years from now
http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=113557


and "african american" is a white political term.
black is what people in the real world use. lol

MaskedAvenger
01-24-2012, 03:23 AM
Hip hop music has been getting waxed since at least the 70s, this is like the 5th decade where you can go purchase hip hop music at a store, its not just some new fad. Of course it will still be relevant.

ShaDynasty
01-24-2012, 07:21 PM
You bringing up the Malcolm X movie is actually another good example of how the different forms of media are manipulated to effect the consumers perception.

somehow i don't think spike lee sees it that way.

apparently, admiral krumple will still be relevant 100 years from now
http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=113557


and "african american" is a white political term.
black is what people in the real world use. lol

to be honest i don't like the term african american either. black is the regular term. but june is trying to claim black is more accurate linguistically or logically and thats false.

i have never met a black person. i know some brown people though. african american for black americans is actually more accurate since they have (mostly) african heritage and live in america.

june181972
01-24-2012, 10:04 PM
somehow i don't think spike lee sees it that way.
If the movie Malcolm X is how Spike Lee "sees" Malcolm's life, then we can't put much stock in how Spike Lee "sees" anything.
Real quick, another MAJOR historical inaccuracy: Louis Farrakhan was Malcolm's under-study and close friend, zero mention of him in the film. I implore you to read between the lines here.


to be honest i don't like the term african american either. black is the regular term. but june is trying to claim black is more accurate linguistically or logically and thats false.
No, Black is more accurate scientifically. There is no brown person without 1st having a Black person. When 2 Black people mate, there is a 1 in four chance that the offspring comes out brown. Over time and through the countless instances of mating, different skin colors come about. (not to go into this too much)
i have never met a black person. i know some brown people though. african american for black americans is actually more accurate since they have (mostly) african heritage and live in america.
I don't know what part of the world you are from or are in, but over here in the greater metropolitan area of New York City, every kind of human being is represented. It's nothing to see a jet Black person; literally Black as the Blackest part of this message board. To confine the Blackman's origins to a land mass labeled "Africa" only a few hundred years ago is historically and scientifically inaccurate. We were Black from the very beginning

P.S. My apologies for this thread taking a turn in this direction

ShaDynasty
01-26-2012, 06:15 PM
It's nothing to see a jet Black person; literally Black as the Blackest part of this message board.

then post a picture of one you fuckin bullshit artist


P.S. My apologies for this thread taking a turn in this direction

not your fault that i felt like arguing.

spike lee is a filmmaker not a documentarian, if he changed a few details it wasn't because he secretly hates black people.

main_man
01-26-2012, 06:58 PM
spike lee is a filmmaker not a documentarian,

not true, he's both.

when the levees broke comes to mind first, but he's done a couple docs.

ShaDynasty
01-26-2012, 07:48 PM
aiight yeah my point was malcolm x wasn't a documentary. jesus.