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blackwisdom
10-29-2005, 03:28 PM
Study a couple of pages from a book then come back and tell us what you learned or something that you may have already known but think will be interesting to others. Each one teach one.

The Jump off:

This book is one from one of my soon to be authors under my new publishing company.

The Queen of Sheba
by: Miriam Robinson

I knew that the Queen of Sheba's name was Makeda, because there is a resturant downtown Portsmouth named Makeda's. Nice resturaunt that serves some great food with live entertainment (I blazed the mic there a couple of times. I need to go back soon). They're Rasta's and on their menue they tell of her story. But back to the book; I learned that Makeda's mother was Sami, a Cushite from the leniage of Noah, Ham, Cush, and Nimrod. I learned how they kept their libraries. They read from papyrus rolls in urns, animal and goat skins, wood, clay paintings, and stone carvings that went back nine to ten millenia. Through a merchant seaman Tamrin the meeting of Makeda and King Solomon came to pass. They had a son named Menelik who became the first Emporer of Ethiopia. Her book was written to inspire women to the understanding of their importance in the world today. Not only that, it's a great source of historical facts. She (Ms. Miriam) digs deep in this book. She has many facts about this legendary woman. We've had several conversations about her and many other figures as well. I would go deep into the book but I don't want to make this too long of a post.

Just give some general information on what you learned, lets make a few comments and move along. To read about the Queen of Sheba's meeting with King Solomon read 1 Kings 10:1-13.

Lets make this an edutaining thread.

Peace

Aqueous Moon
10-29-2005, 05:01 PM
Peace Black Wisdom -

This is a great idea you have come up with. This book I have in mind is called ,
"Piercing The Fog; Enlighten Luminaries", it was written by Yaffi Vashti. The author is one deep sister and this book was loaned to me by another very special person.

It is so hard to boil it down to a couple of pages. This book truly is a jewel from start to finish, but I will try to express some of the things I learned from it.

The author offers a lot of info about the legal cages of slavery we live in. She explains how they use all capitol letters in the spelling of names on legal documents to implement their rights of ownership of said person in such a document.

Yaffa tells us how we can combat this trickery by gaining legal sovereignty. Some of the things she suggests we do are: legally changing our names to reflect our righteous selves and not corresponding in the name they use as property. She also says that we should nationalize as a Moor to procalim our true identities. She also suggest that we get a complete undertanding of who and what the enemy is, especialy in his legal form.

Like you said, Black Wisdom I could go on and on. But, just knowing that this information is out there can give one the motivation to search it out.
Here is a link on some info about what the Moors are about today. You can get sovereignty through them.
http://www.radiostationcentral.com/

http://rds.yahoo.com/;_ylt=AhtGkgruHG.WWqOZZxkbFTNXNyoA;_ylu=X3oDMTE4OW xjdjBjBGNvbG8DdwRsA1dTMQRwb3MDMTEEc2VjA3NyBHZ0aWQD QzIzOV8xMDg-/SIG=124jf0r4g/EXP=1131477117/**http%3A%2F%2Fwww.riseagain.info%2Fblackturtle.ht ml

Great pic of Bush in your sig : very eye - opening.
Peace, Aqueous Moon

blackwisdom
10-29-2005, 05:37 PM
Her book almost sounds like a local warrior's book. He was a Captain in the Army but got out once he attained supreme knowledge of self. Once he learned that he was a decendent of the Moors, he changed his approach on life. He's a writer/poet/activist/teacher. Honestly I haven't read the book yet. I bought is several months ago when I met him at a fund raising poetry reading. I've spoken to him on several occasions and he's sorta mentored me through some very difficult decision making. A great Brother. As a matter of fact I think I'll read it right now. I'll be back after while with the scoop. Here's the cover and his POC info.

http://www.leemeeart.com/latiffrontsmallweb.jpg

Manifesto Of A Black Man - Black Nationalism
Published by Latif A Tarik
Writer, Educator, Community Mentor

220 Elm Ave
Portsmouth, VA 23704
(757) 477 - 6284
latif_tarik@yahoo.com

Peace

TeknicelStylez
10-29-2005, 06:15 PM
Peace Black Wisdom -

This is a great idea you have come up with. This book I have in mind is called ,
"Piercing The Fog; Enlighten Luminaries", it was written by Yaffi Vashti. The author is one deep sister and this book was loaned to me by another very special person.

It is so hard to boil it down to a couple of pages. This book truly is a jewel from start to finish, but I will try to express some of the things I learned from it.

The author offers a lot of info about the legal cages of slavery we live in. She explains how they use all capitol letters in the spelling of names on legal documents to implement their rights of ownership of said person in such a document.

Yaffa tells us how we can combat this trickery by gaining legal sovereignty. Some of the things she suggests we do are: legally changing our names to reflect our righteous selves and not corresponding in the name they use as property. She also says that we should nationalize as a Moor to procalim our true identities. She also suggest that we get a complete undertanding of who and what the enemy is, especialy in his legal form.

Like you said, Black Wisdom I could go on and on. But, just knowing that this information is out there can give one the motivation to search it out.

Great pic of Bush in your sig : very eye - opening.
Peace, Aqueous MoonPEACE.

I'll have to check that out myself. My ancestors are from the Canary Islands, wich was conquered by the Moors, so I too am a descendent of the Moors. I will definately keep my eyes open for this book.

WARPATH
10-29-2005, 08:10 PM
Black Elk Speaks

A Biography by John G. Niedhardt

John Niedhardt comes to the Pine Ridge Indian reservation(where I currentley reside) and interviews Black Elk and some other old Natives about growing up during war times vs. the U.S. government-spirituality, and life of a boy growing to be warrior and defending families from crazy white people on their quest for gold in the black hills- thus far anyways i'm about 1/3 through the book-

It's interesting to hear about how the battles took place, and how brutal things got- and at the same time the intelligence in everything from war tactics to life and growing up in general.- exspecially when there's refrences in the book to land marks, and people when I interact with their grand children on the daily- seeing the difference on how are great great grand parents lived a hundred years ago and the struggle- and then stepping out side the front door- to see the similar struggle that still exist today

one thing I learned-

Harney Peek in the Black Hills is the Center of the Earth

Os3y3ris
10-29-2005, 09:08 PM
Just finished "Thug or A Million Murders" by some guy named Sleeman. Its the real life stories of the Hindu/Muslim strangling fraternity. Learned quite a few things. Most interestingly it shed a different light in British imperialism. In this case, they really did seem to do some good in eliminating the Thuggee. As evil as the British were, perhaps there was some sincerity in their work on rare occassions? More relevantly, the book was an interesting look at religious fanaticsism. The Thugs would really seek approval from their god (Kali) to commit there murders. On the other hand, they'd break her laws and they saw that any negative response was her will. Also interesting is that the Muslim Thugs would deny Allah's complicity in their murders, but at the same time, claim Allah's acceptance due to them being ordered by Kali.

Good book.

blackwisdom
10-30-2005, 11:21 AM
Black Elk Speaks

A Biography by John G. Niedhardt

John Niedhardt comes to the Pine Ridge Indian reservation(where I currentley reside) and interviews Black Elk and some other old Natives about growing up during war times vs. the U.S. government-spirituality, and life of a boy growing to be warrior and defending families from crazy white people on their quest for gold in the black hills- thus far anyways i'm about 1/3 through the book-

It's interesting to hear about how the battles took place, and how brutal things got- and at the same time the intelligence in everything from war tactics to life and growing up in general.- exspecially when there's refrences in the book to land marks, and people when I interact with their grand children on the daily- seeing the difference on how are great great grand parents lived a hundred years ago and the struggle- and then stepping out side the front door- to see the similar struggle that still exist today

one thing I learned-

Harney Peek in the Black Hills is the Center of the EarthAlso read Bury My Heart of Wounded Knee. A Great book. I started it a while back but haven't completed it yet. It talks about the many battles of the Natives with the imperial powers of the "U.S." A muslim friend of mines recommended it to me one day in his book store. He said that it would brings you to tears. I would have cries already but I am very accustomed to their ways by now. I feel pain when I hear the story, but I don't allow it to consume me any longer.

I had to finish Latif Tarik's book last night that I mentioned earlier. A masterpiece. I love that Brother's heart and mind. I'ma reach out to him as soon as I'm done typing here as a matter of fact.

Lets keep learning and growing.

Hotep

blackwisdom
10-30-2005, 11:26 AM
Just finished "Thug or A Million Murders" by some guy named Sleeman. Its the real life stories of the Hindu/Muslim strangling fraternity. Learned quite a few things. Most interestingly it shed a different light in British imperialism. In this case, they really did seem to do some good in eliminating the Thuggee. As evil as the British were, perhaps there was some sincerity in their work on rare occassions? More relevantly, the book was an interesting look at religious fanaticsism. The Thugs would really seek approval from their god (Kali) to commit there murders. On the other hand, they'd break her laws and they saw that any negative response was her will. Also interesting is that the Muslim Thugs would deny Allah's complicity in their murders, but at the same time, claim Allah's acceptance due to them being ordered by Kali.

Good book.From your understanding how, who, what, when, why, where did thug come from? If you can share that I would greatly appreciate it.

Hotep

noel411
10-30-2005, 04:07 PM
I am reading the conclusion to "Not Out of Africa". After going in to detail to show how some African American historians have essentially re-written history concerning the Greeks and Egyptians, in order to glorify the black man's role in history, by claiming such things as Greek philosophy and religion were borrowed, influenced, and even stolen from the Egyptians, it is now discussing the effects this has on history and African Americans today. Basically going into detail about how teaching false history to the youth is damaging in that it teaches people to accept what they're told, without seeking valid evidence to back it up, and also how it should not be acceptable to teach false history for the sake of racial glorification and upliftment. It also discusses the problem of white people being hesitant in refuting false Afrocentric teachings, for the fear of being labelled a "racist", and how this has helped Afrocentrists to teach their false history.

All in all the book is a good read. My history isn't all that great, which took away from it a little, as the book is based on Greek and Egyptian history, which I haven't studied since I was about 17-18, and has largely slipped my mind. I am actually enjoying the conclusion of the book more than the main body, as it gives a good broad argument for the damaging effects of teaching false history.

Os3y3ris
10-30-2005, 04:13 PM
From your understanding how, who, what, when, why, where did thug come from? If you can share that I would greatly appreciate it.

Hotep

I've done some research, but couldn't find a real hint of their origins, besides the fact that they're centuries old and Hindu, previously known simply as "phansigars" or "stranglers". According to the Thuggee, they were created by the god Kali. She was killing demons and every drop of blood she shed with her sword spawned another so she created two Thugs to kill them with a hankerchief. They strangled the demons and as a reward gained the right to murder all who Kali commanded. Thats the origin story. As for the facts of the matter, no one outside of Thuggee would really know and those inside are always insisting of the divinity of their origins and actions, so they wouldn't contradict that with a solid story.

blackwisdom
10-30-2005, 05:33 PM
I am reading the conclusion to "Not Out of Africa". After going in to detail to show how some African American historians have essentially re-written history concerning the Greeks and Egyptians, in order to glorify the black man's role in history, by claiming such things as Greek philosophy and religion were borrowed, influenced, and even stolen from the Egyptians, it is now discussing the effects this has on history and African Americans today. Basically going into detail about how teaching false history to the youth is damaging in that it teaches people to accept what they're told, without seeking valid evidence to back it up, and also how it should not be acceptable to teach false history for the sake of racial glorification and upliftment. It also discusses the problem of white people being hesitant in refuting false Afrocentric teachings, for the fear of being labelled a "racist", and how this has helped Afrocentrists to teach their false history.

All in all the book is a good read. My history isn't all that great, which took away from it a little, as the book is based on Greek and Egyptian history, which I haven't studied since I was about 17-18, and has largely slipped my mind. I am actually enjoying the conclusion of the book more than the main body, as it gives a good broad argument for the damaging effects of teaching false history.I had to look this up. I read some of the exerpts from it and I see somewhat of where he's coming from. The hit on Dr. Ben is interesting. I don't know, Dr. Ben is on point. When I get the time I'll really check him out to see what he's really talking about. Some of what I scanned through bothered me. But it's all good, everyone has their say. For those of you who want to see that this book is real, here you go...

http://images.amazon.com/images/P/046509838X.01._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-dp-500-arrow,TopRight,45,-64_AA240_SH20_SCLZZZZZZZ_.jpg (http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/046509838X/ref=sib_dp_pt/102-3653774-7963364#reader-link)

Hotep

blackwisdom
10-30-2005, 05:35 PM
[/color][/size]

I've done some research, but couldn't find a real hint of their origins, besides the fact that they're centuries old and Hindu, previously known simply as "phansigars" or "stranglers". According to the Thuggee, they were created by the god Kali. She was killing demons and every drop of blood she shed with her sword spawned another so she created two Thugs to kill them with a hankerchief. They strangled the demons and as a reward gained the right to murder all who Kali commanded. Thats the origin story. As for the facts of the matter, no one outside of Thuggee would really know and those inside are always insisting of the divinity of their origins and actions, so they wouldn't contradict that with a solid story.Thank you for your well thought out response.

Hotep

noel411
10-30-2005, 07:25 PM
Some of what I scanned through bothered meYep. Well sometimes you've just gotta read things that bother you to get the full picture. Although I absolutely despise religion to the point of it often infuriating me, I read books from a pro-religious perspective so I can hear their side of the story. That's the best way to really learn about something imo.

noel411
10-30-2005, 07:52 PM
Btw, could you recommend a basic book on Afrocentrism and its teachings, to me. I just want a basic overview of Afrocentric teachings, and the reasons why such theories came to be accepted as truth. Written from an Afrocentric point of veiw preferably. I'm not looking for anything too in depth. About 200-300 pages would be good. Something easy to get hold of too.

cd
11-03-2005, 01:40 PM
very interesting....

blackwisdom
11-03-2005, 03:06 PM
Yep. Well sometimes you've just gotta read things that bother you to get the full picture.I wasn't bothered by his info rather it was his motives. To start check out the sources that he was trying to degrade. Those brothers have done some indept research. Read Dr. Ben and Mr. Diop. Some really indept info. They have a strong bias as well but they understand the Emergency Room policy.

Hotep

noel411
11-03-2005, 03:48 PM
I'm willing to read pro-Afrocentric material, that's why I asked about a general book. I'm not gonna study it in detail though, as it is not of particular interest to me, and I don't think I'd gain much from it. And that's nonsense that she (the author is female) set out to "degrade" the sources she spoke on. That's the sort of attitude that makes me think books like this one are very necessary. She barely even tried to refute what those people taught, more so just showed that there was no reason to believe what they taught, other than possibility, and in some cases probability. The book was about basing historical study on evidence, which she showed a lot of Afrocentric teachers do not do. She was a little bias too, as most people are, and she admitted as much in the conclusion, but she backed up everything she said with references to sources and historical studies.

All in all she put forward her case in a very reasonable, far from "degrading" (unless you've already decided this book sets out to degrade Afrocentrists, in which case you'll pretend it's degrading regardless of whether or not it is), manner. If you read the conclusion and epilogue at the end and you still can't see why it might be important for books like this to be written and shared with the public, then you're in self denial.

I think you should read it.

blackwisdom
11-03-2005, 04:49 PM
I'm willing to read pro-Afrocentric material, that's why I asked about a general book. 1)I'm not gonna study it in detail though, as it is not of particular interest to me, and I don't think I'd gain much from it. And that's nonsense that she (the author is female) set out to "degrade" the sources she spoke on. That's the sort of attitude that makes me think books like this one are very necessary. She 2.1)barely even tried to refute what those people taught, more so 2.2)just showed that there was no reason to believe what they taught, other than possibility, and in some cases probability. The book was about basing historical study on evidence, which she showed a lot of Afrocentric teachers do not do. She was a little bias too, as most people are, and she admitted as much in the conclusion, but 3)she backed up everything she said with references to sources and historical studies.

All in all she put forward her case in a very reasonable, far from "degrading" (4)unless you've already decided this book sets out to degrade Afrocentrists, in which case you'll pretend it's degrading regardless of whether or not it is), manner. 5)If you read the conclusion and epilogue at the end and you still can't see why it might be important for books like this to be written and shared with the public, then you're in self denial.

6)I think you should read it.1) Then don't waste your time.

2) It looks to me that she is trying to knock what they are saying.

3) So do my scholars.

4) That's how you present her.

5) I won't waste my time to hear her out. I have too little time and too many productive things to do than stagnate myself with her work.

6) Opinion.

One more thing, why should I study her book that aparantly attempt to down play what Black and Brown people have been fighting for for 6000 years, and you won't study my scholars? It doesn't add up to me.

Hotep

noel411
11-03-2005, 06:10 PM
1. I don't plan to.

2. If you read the book you will see why she says what she says. At times her manner of wording suggests that she may find certain Afrocentric teachings to be absurd, but she also shows a good case for what makes her feel that way. At no point does she try to "knock" anybodies beliefs.

3. Good. That's always positive.

4. That's how you want me to present her.

5. No worries. Your loss. Just be sure not to write off any of her work, studies, or beliefs, unless you've actually read her work.

6. Certainly.

One more thing. For the third time now, I will present my interest in reading a general overview of Afrocentric studies and teachings. This book was less than 200 pages. I am willing to give up 200-300 pages of my time to see the other side of the story.

why should I study her book that aparantly attempt to down play what Black and Brown people have been fighting for for 6000 yearsIt's entirely your choice. If you wanna continually fill your head with one side of the story, that's up to you. Just realise that there are plenty of more widely learned people out there who will always have arguments for your one sided beliefs.

WARPATH
11-03-2005, 06:26 PM
Also read Bury My Heart of Wounded Knee. A Great book. I started it a while back but haven't completed it yet. It talks about the many battles of the Natives with the imperial powers of the "U.S." A muslim friend of mines recommended it to me one day in his book store. He said that it would brings you to tears. I would have cries already but I am very accustomed to their ways by now. I feel pain when I hear the story, but I don't allow it to consume me any longer.

I had to finish Latif Tarik's book last night that I mentioned earlier. A masterpiece. I love that Brother's heart and mind. I'ma reach out to him as soon as I'm done typing here as a matter of fact.

Lets keep learning and growing.

Hotep
that's interesting- I live about 5 miles away from the wounded knee massacre site, the mass grave is there on top of a hill and old church is built.- as a child I didn't know what happened their and of course when as I became older I found out- I had played in the small canyons and walked where my ancestors hid while they were being hunted by American soldiers- alot of the people that live in the housing there believe that whole area is haunted- I've never had an experience with ghosts while living there but I have family that've had some wicked experiences- also - when I started reading Black Elk speaks- where black elk was interviewed- I realized I had been there before or near there- an old abandoned house in white horse creek north of wounded knee- I could be wrong and that may not be the place but it puts a vivid image in my head when I read the book.

blackwisdom
11-04-2005, 02:17 PM
that's interesting- I live about 5 miles away from the wounded knee massacre site, the mass grave is there on top of a hill and old church is built.- as a child I didn't know what happened their and of course when as I became older I found out- I had played in the small canyons and walked where my ancestors hid while they were being hunted by American soldiers- alot of the people that live in the housing there believe that whole area is haunted- I've never had an experience with ghosts while living there but I have family that've had some wicked experiences- also - when I started reading Black Elk speaks- where black elk was interviewed- I realized I had been there before or near there- an old abandoned house in white horse creek north of wounded knee- I could be wrong and that may not be the place but it puts a vivid image in my head when I read the book.I almost got chills while reading your post. It's a crime of the highest degree, what the American Army did to the Native Americans and Africans. I would really like to visit those sites to witness first hand the spirit of the land. It's a shame but it seems that Africans, Native Americans, and Caribbean people are talking about unifying for a common cause. I pray that it happens soon because the way the power structure is going right now destruction is unavoidable. Certain types of people don't need certain levels of power for too extended periods of time, but I feel that it's time.

Right now I'm studying up on Kwanzaa. ODU is going to have a outstanding Kwanzaa celebration this year. I've spoken to one of my Brothers who is the President of the committee and he said that they're going to bring the old school flavor back.

noel despite different world views I know that we'll all continue to be...

Hotep

noel411
11-04-2005, 08:44 PM
noel despite different world views I know that we'll all continue to be... Word is Bon Jovi.

Aqueous Moon
11-05-2005, 02:14 PM
Peace

This next book that I have in mind is pretty popular. It is "Natural Cures They Don't Want You To Know About" by Kevin Trudeau.

I am pretty much a night owl...I hate sleep, usually I don't sleep, but anyway I kept seeing this damn infomercial on t.v., and one night i decided to pay attentiion to it. Kevin was basically talking about the conspiracy between the FDA and the FTC. It is suffice to say that as soon I hear conspiracy talk I'm all ears...lol.

So, I ordered the book and he does go in great detail about how the food companies aim to keep people sick and addicted to poison foods to in turn create more demand for those products and leave people in need of various drugs to combat their resulting illness.

He also, gives you a lot of different ways to detox your body like doing colon cleanses, he tells you about eliminating candida, and doing alphabiotics...the list goes on.

I liked this book, but I was really annoyed with the constant pitching of various cleansing products. He was so busy trying to sell me something that I had I hard time focusing on the info he presents. It was definitely worth the read though. And shows you how money controls all aspects of America.

Peace

blackwisdom
11-12-2005, 06:31 PM
Btw, could you recommend a basic book on Afrocentrism and its teachings, to me. I just want a basic overview of Afrocentric teachings, and the reasons why such theories came to be accepted as truth. Written from an Afrocentric point of veiw preferably. I'm not looking for anything too in depth. About 200-300 pages would be good. Something easy to get hold of too.

Look up Molefi Asante. He made some comments about the book you recommended.

Hotep

JASPER
11-12-2005, 06:34 PM
I started reading Mein Kampf... it's pretty interesting. I'll quote some interesting parts if I can find a translation.

blackwisdom
11-12-2005, 06:34 PM
Peace

This next book that I have in mind is pretty popular. It is "Natural Cures They Don't Want You To Know About" by Kevin Trudeau.

I am pretty much a night owl...I hate sleep, usually I don't sleep, but anyway I kept seeing this damn infomercial on t.v., and one night i decided to pay attentiion to it. Kevin was basically talking about the conspiracy between the FDA and the FTC. It is suffice to say that as soon I hear conspiracy talk I'm all ears...lol.

So, I ordered the book and he does go in great detail about how the food companies aim to keep people sick and addicted to poison foods to in turn create more demand for those products and leave people in need of various drugs to combat their resulting illness.

He also, gives you a lot of different ways to detox your body like doing colon cleanses, he tells you about eliminating candida, and doing alphabiotics...the list goes on.

I liked this book, but I was really annoyed with the constant pitching of various cleansing products. He was so busy trying to sell me something that I had I hard time focusing on the info he presents. It was definitely worth the read though. And shows you how money controls all aspects of America.

PeaceYeah, I been reading this. http://www.africanbookstore.net/prodimages/africanholistic_lg.jpg
It's a must for anyone's library.

Hotep

noel411
11-14-2005, 04:33 AM
Look up Molefi Asante. He made some comments about the book you recommended.

Hotep Cool. I'll see if I can't get my hands on something he wrote. Thanks.