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View Full Version : Fuck the internet, how much longer do you think we'll have drinkable water?


WARPATH
07-27-2006, 10:25 PM
I work in water conservation for the tribe. It's my job to shut people down when their wasting water.

Today I seen such much fucking waste it makes me sick. The amount of water spraying over one guys yard is enough to fill a water tower....litterally.

Everyday we pee and shit in clean water.

Water tables continue to decline, we continue to spray water on grass, that serves no purpose other then to beutfy the 10 by 10 foot of land we don't even own.

I've seen one leaking toilet fill valve lose over 100,000 gallons in a month.

I watch as many natives on the tribe don't have yards, and therefore don't have waste, then there are few who water 24/7 draining our water tables for the purpose of beutifcation, when everything around them is dirty, dusty and trashy. Then I see those whose waste is solely from plumbing, people who can't afford to have their pipes fixed- wasting still.

We're running out of water. Not just my tribe, but the worlds fresh water supply is depleting rapidly.

How long do you have until people quit fight over oil, and start fighting over drinkable water?

By using the bathroom, i'm making my great grand children suffer. What will are children, or our grand children do?

whitey
07-27-2006, 10:37 PM
This is a viable topic for discussion among political scientists. There is definatly stuff out there about "Water Wars" in the future. Its the life blood of anything. Even more important than oil, it will happen. Just give it time.

Os3y3ris
07-27-2006, 10:55 PM
Seriously, it falls from the sky on a regular bases. We wnt run out.

Unforgiven
07-27-2006, 11:11 PM
Who gives a fuck, we'll all be dead by the time that happens....

Kong
07-27-2006, 11:17 PM
Why worry? nothing can be done, this world is to much of a mess to change now.

WARPATH
07-28-2006, 12:09 AM
Seriously, it falls from the sky on a regular bases. We wnt run out.

It doesn't fall from the sky on a regular basis everywhere, and even the places it does fall, it's becoming unsafe to drink because of pollution.

WARPATH
07-28-2006, 12:11 AM
Who gives a fuck, we'll all be dead by the time that happens....

But your children, or your chilrends children will be alive. I think if my ancestors and great great gandparents just siad fuck it, let's not fight for our lives and the U.S. government wipe us off the planet, I wouldn't be here talking to you today.

WARPATH
07-28-2006, 12:12 AM
Why worry? nothing can be done, this world is to much of a mess to change now.

With people with attitudes like yours....you may be right. Ask yourself this: Are you part of the solution or part of the problem?

Longbongcilvaringz
07-28-2006, 02:48 AM
we live on a fucked up planet, the entire environment is fucked up.

its because all people are so short sighted, they don't even think about anyone but themselves. the planet will be uninhabital soon but everyone has the attitude "im wont be here so why the fuck should i care"

Visionz
07-28-2006, 03:19 AM
That the kind of attitude that got us here in the first place.^No grand visions to work towards just bullshit greed amassing more and more wealth, killing more and more people. Tomorrow doesn't have to be doomed but that means you have to start saving it today.

supremecharma
07-28-2006, 04:06 AM
tell that to big government peeps. they wont stop watering their huge acres of land - whatever happens - nobody can stop that.what can ANYONE do about it? i'll tell you - NOTHING.

LHX
07-28-2006, 10:33 AM
not that its a solution to the problem, but we can get all our water intake from eating fruits and vegetables


its gonna be a strange day when everybody here wakes up wiff no water

we are gonna get to see what people are really about

brothers killing brothers
wives killing husbands
parents killing kids

nasty

JASPER
07-28-2006, 10:38 AM
I'll drink my own piss before this happens. Or maybe I'll become an evil vampire
freak and drink peoples blood like it was koolaid.

THE W
07-28-2006, 11:38 AM
definately something to think about.

LHX
07-28-2006, 11:41 AM
watermelon
cucumbers
apples
tomatoes
citrus fruits
grapes
lettuce
carrots
beets
pears

high water content in all those

ERN-DAWGY
07-28-2006, 11:49 AM
just drink some sea water, boil the water n take the salt out..cool the mutha fucka n chug it

Edgar Erebus
07-28-2006, 12:12 PM
We was making an interesting equation @ school regarding water on April 22.

Let's see...

Assuming mankina gon keep on growin on logarythmic basis indefinitely and water reserves gon stay equal, we gon start to miss water... 3200 years from now? By then we gon all be dead in a nuclear war (M.A.D. strategy), so I don't bother with water.

Kong
07-28-2006, 12:27 PM
With people with attitudes like yours....you may be right. Ask yourself this: Are you part of the solution or part of the problem?

Neither, i am just here. But my attitude aint making the water run out, the worlds attitude is and i don't think it can be changed.

Unforgiven
07-28-2006, 02:24 PM
But your children, or your chilrends children will be alive. I think if my ancestors and great great gandparents just siad fuck it, let's not fight for our lives and the U.S. government wipe us off the planet, I wouldn't be here talking to you today.

Earth will be un-inhabitable by the time we run out of water, its not gonna happen for 1,000s and 1,000s of years...

Kong
07-29-2006, 07:03 AM
^nah sooner man. I'm leaving the tap on! (joke) but it will be sooner than that won't it?


edit:

i just thought, did anyone in here used to watch six feet under, george worried to much...

MsRzaRecTaH
07-29-2006, 01:47 PM
I thought about that before... and my kids and their kids and so on...

tacle
07-29-2006, 01:49 PM
I like water, when it runs out i won't be drinkin' it from my usual glass, so it's fine.

Blazing Fire
07-29-2006, 05:08 PM
the earth is a closed system

go ahead and "waste" water its not going anywhere

you might have to relocate, but the earth won't know the difference

UNCLE RUCKUS
07-29-2006, 06:01 PM
Peace Charging Soldier
This is something thats been touched on quite creatively in the past like Mos Defs Water or this Mumia piece...
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7C4TNqbnQVA

I think its one of the most imporatant and relevant subjects thats been touched on in KTL
Peace Bro!

Strange Fruit
07-29-2006, 07:41 PM
hhmmm,,, you know, i heard someone say the other day:

"we're gonna find a substitute for water, just in case water is temporary.
so humans will be able to live without worry again."

bullshit or no?
do you think there's a substance out there that can substitute water?

{save water drink beer}
^ lol

i dunno.
just wanna see your opinions on it.

Aqueous Moon
07-30-2006, 01:30 AM
Peace C.S.

Man...that's my worry. I'v learned how to purify water through distillation...but, still I can't help but worry about the panic that will set in once people began dying of thirst.

I learned about that stuff when y2k was supposed to shut down the system....I still remember how to can food and how to purify water.

The least we all can do is learn how to purify water.

Aqueous Moon
07-30-2006, 01:46 AM
It's real simple....all you have to do is boil the water under a lid....as the water starts to evaporate cool it and contain it.

You can easily make a home distillation kit. The important thing is to collect the water that evaporates from the boiling...you can see it when you lift up the lid of the pot. If you don't have a distilllation thingy then just collect the evaporated lid water the best way you can.

It's the purest water you can get. And it's a slow process if you can't directly convert the steam into water through a distillatin kit. But 3-5 drops of distilled water a day will enable you to survive for a long while. Maybe 3 months.

Kephrem
07-30-2006, 01:54 AM
More than 60 percent of U.S. in drought

By JAMES MacPHERSON, Associated Press Writer
7/29/06


STEELE, N.D. - More than 60 percent of the United States now has abnormally dry or drought conditions, stretching from Georgia to Arizona and across the north through the Dakotas, Minnesota, Montana and Wisconsin, said Mark Svoboda, a climatologist for the National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska at Lincoln.


An area stretching from south central North Dakota to central South Dakota is the most drought-stricken region in the nation, Svoboda said.

"It's the epicenter," he said. "It's just like a wasteland in north central South Dakota."

Conditions aren't much better a little farther north. Paul Smokov and his wife, Betty, raise several hundred cattle on their 1,750-acre ranch north of Steele, a town of about 760 people.

Fields of wheat, durum and barley in the Dakotas this dry summer will never end up as pasta, bread or beer. What is left of the stifled crops has been salvaged to feed livestock struggling on pastures where hot winds blow clouds of dirt from dried-out ponds.

Some ranchers have been forced to sell their entire herds, and others are either moving their cattle to greener pastures or buying more already-costly feed. Hundreds of acres of grasslands have been blackened by fires sparked by lightning or farm equipment.

"These 100-degree days for weeks steady have been burning everything up," said Steele Mayor Walter Johnson, who added that he'd prefer 2 feet of snow over this weather.

Farm ponds and other small bodies of water have dried out from the heat, leaving the residual alkali dust to be whipped up by the wind. The blowing, dirt-and-salt mixture is a phenomenon that hasn't been seen in south central North Dakota since the Dust Bowl of the 1930s, Johnson said.

North Dakota's all-time high temperature was set here in July 1936, at 121. Smokov, now 81, remembers that time and believes conditions this summer probably are worse.

"I could see this coming in May," Smokov said of the parched pastures and wilted crops. "That's the time the good Lord gives us our general rains. But we never got them this year."

Brad Rippey, a federal Agriculture Department meteorologist in Washington, said this year's drought is continuing one that started in the late 1990s. "The 1999 to 2006 drought ranks only behind the 1930s and the 1950s. It's the third-worst drought on record period," Rippey said.

Svoboda was reluctant to say how bad the current drought might eventually be.

"We'll have to wait to see how it plays out but it's definitely bad," he said. "And the drought seems to not be going anywhere soon."

Herman Schumacher, who owns Herreid Livestock Auction in north central South Dakota, said his company is handling more sales than ever because of the drought.

In May, June and July last year, his company sold 3,800 cattle. During the same months this year, more than 27,000 cattle have been sold, he said.

"I've been in the barn here for 25 years and I can't even compare this year to any other year," Schumacher said.

He said about 50 ranchers have run cows through his auction this year.

"Some of them just trimmed off their herds, but about a third of them were complete dispersions they'll never be back," he said.

"This county is looking rough these 100-degree days are just killing us," said Gwen Payne, a North Dakota State University extension agent in Kidder County, where Steele is located.

The Agriculture Department says North Dakota last year led the nation in production of 15 different commodity classes, including spring wheat, durum wheat, barley, oats, canola, pinto beans, dry edible peas, lentils, flaxseed, sunflower and honey.

North Dakota State University professor and researcher Larry Leistritz said it's too early to tell what effect this year's drought will have on commodity prices. Flour prices already have gone up and may rise more because of the effect of drought on wheat.

"There will be somewhat higher grain prices, no doubt about it," Leistritz said. "With livestock, the short-term effect may mean depressed meat prices, with a larger number of animals being sent to slaughter. But in the longer run it may prolong the period of relatively high meat prices."

Eventually, more than farmers could suffer.

"Agriculture is not only the biggest industry in the state, it's just about the only industry," Leistritz said. "Communities live or die with the fortunes of agriculture."

Susie White, who runs the Lone Steer motel and restaurant in Steele, along Interstate 94, said even out-of-state travelers notice the drought.

"Even I never paid attention to the crops around here. But I notice them now because they're not there," she said.

"We're all wondering how we're going to stay alive this winter if the farmers don't make any money this summer," she said.

tacle
07-30-2006, 09:28 AM
Oh baby, for heavens sake.

Os3y3ris
07-30-2006, 08:22 PM
You can remove about anything from water by boilng at various temps. Kinda like how you can boil alcohol out. Dont worry about it.

deadlymelody
07-31-2006, 02:02 AM
That drought article is SERIOUS business. My dad is a farmer in one of the drought stricken areas in South Dakota. I can tell you right now that the entire economy could change drastically if the current drought keeps up. The midwest is turning into a damn desert it's just plain depressing.

Robert
07-31-2006, 12:14 PM
In 1987 the UN released a document on sustainability called "Our Common Future" in that document they describe sustainable development as "development that meets the needs of the present generation without comprimising the abilty of future generations to meet there needs". This statement sums up how we should approach water use and water management.

In Australia we are starting to have the same problems, traditionally ppl here have thought it a right to have nice gardens and expansive lawns but really this is not sustainable. We need to be looking towards water recycling strategies, such as recycling sewerage water to make it potable (think this is disgusting? Its perfectly clean and is already done in many places in Europe), and recycling grey water (water used for washing clothes, dishes) onto our gardens.

Attitudes must change, the wasteful attitudes of the past are not sustainable but people don't seem to mind that they are making life difficult for future generations. Maybe if water was more expensive (this is important for household users and agriculture) then it would be used in a more efficient fashion. Maybe this is the only way to get through to ppl.

And LHX.....cucumbers and all the stuff you mentioned require vast amounts of water to grow so i hope you got a plan B when the water runs out......
peace

WARPATH
07-31-2006, 01:40 PM
You can remove about anything from water by boilng at various temps. Kinda like how you can boil alcohol out. Dont worry about it.

Ok, i'd like to you see boil the "shit" out of your toilet water and drink it.

Treazon
07-31-2006, 02:44 PM
water is like energy, it cant be made or destroyed, it just changes shape...atleast with our limited knowledge

with that in mind, and also with something someone mentioned (cant remember who, but respect to you), earth is a closed environment. water cant just be wasted, only used. the only time water is used is to feed living organisms, and even then, not all of it is absorbed. when we intake water, it is for health, simply our body needs it to survive. but when you take a nice big glass of water down, dont assume that this water wont return to the atmosphere just like rainwater. your piss isn't a solid is it? and when we feed plants water, dont label that as wasting. basic biology tells us that cellular respiration in animals creates water out of oxygen, and photosynthesis in plants creates oxygen out of water - IN BASIC TERMS. just like carbon, water has a never-ending cycle, in which very little is actually consumed/converted, and when it is, it is vital to life which we are so preciously trying to keep safe.

water can be extracted from millions of places on earth, and new technology im sure will find new, effecient ways to do so. we already know how to purify contaminated water, as 90% of this discussion has dealt with, but thats not the major issue. yes, droughts suck, although i have no first-hand experience with one, im imaginative enough to think of its consequences. but like i said, its all part of an on-going cycle, i just dont think we realize when we have an abundance of usable water, we just use it. just like "theres only a God when you need one".

alot of my ideas are half-baked and i realize that, its just because i dont think conserving of water is our biggest responsibility, especially at this time. the earth is the hottest its been since that guy, Jesus, was walkin around. and i know thats just another media scare-tactic, but that doesnt mean its false and things shouldnt be done about that, too.

what i think we need, is considerable advancements in the areas of medicine, and education which better a society. not warfare and skeeming politics, which rip at its fibre. but thats another thread.

my 2 cents, peace.

Os3y3ris
07-31-2006, 06:08 PM
The earth is 70% water guys.

Robert
08-01-2006, 12:20 AM
Yeah the conversion of toilet water in completed through a process of reverse osmosis, you end up with with water that is probably cleaner then what you already drink, in fact many ppl unknowingly drink water drawn from river systems where treated sewage is released....think about that!

Dough Snatcher
08-01-2006, 01:31 AM
I dont know man, i mean dude has his point, and this does kinda make me think. But at same time what can i do about this? This is life homie, you know its just the way we live. Civilized life is the way to go for me. I mean im not about to collect my "stoll" over a certain period of time just to keep the water bill down or to help improve the enviroment. The way i live is just the way i live ya know...

Robert
08-01-2006, 12:30 PM
I dont know man, i mean dude has his point, and this does kinda make me think. But at same time what can i do about this? This is life homie, you know its just the way we live. Civilized life is the way to go for me. I mean im not about to collect my "stoll" over a certain period of time just to keep the water bill down or to help improve the enviroment. The way i live is just the way i live ya know...

But is it right that way you live could negatively impact on the way future generations live? I think not.....this problem can be solved but ppl like you arent prepared to make relatively small sacrafices....
peace

Robert
08-01-2006, 12:44 PM
with that in mind, and also with something someone mentioned earth is a closed environment. water cant just be wasted, only used.

and.....

i just dont think we realize when we have an abundance of usable water, we just use it.

and.....

alot of my ideas are half-baked and i realize that, its just because i dont think conserving of water is our biggest responsibility



I think what you have to realise is that much of the water you speak of is not accessable or potable and the consequences of removing it can be dramatic. For example, the removal of ground water has caused the rising of water tables and widespread salinity problems in many parts of the world, rendering areas unfit for agriculture, meaning that despite there being a large supply of water underground the consequences of removing it outweigh the benefits.

You must also remember that most of the world's water is salt water, and desal plants are expensive and have a negative impact on the environment (hyper saline waste and green house gases)

Basically this problem is greater then most ppl think. In areas inhabited by many ppl, rainfall has dropped markedly over the last 15 years, dam levels are dropping these things cant be ignored.....