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tical2000
03-05-2007, 07:00 PM
So it seems Hip-Hop has hit a wall artistically and commercially, Hip Hop sales are down 20% from a year ago (more than any other genre). I think this has been a gradual downswing that has been building for years....the over commercialization of hip hop into one sound alike genre had had alot to do with this decline. Like how many more rappers named "young" or "lil" do we really need.....like if you flip on MTV and watched 10 rap video's in a row, they all look and sound the same...Lets face it rap has turned into disposable disco-pop (just look at the lack of classic albums that have come out durring the last 2-3 years)....I think the general public has finally gotten sick of the same old over-commericalized crap that the record companies are trying to feed us, wich accounts for people not buying it anymore

Hip Hop has changed from a sub-culture to something owned by corporations to sell hamburgers and cell phones. Lets face it Hip-hop does not really stand for shit in 2007 (I dont see any Ice Cubes or Public Enemies anywhere near the charts today). To quote NAS maybe Hip hop has to be "destroy'ed and rebuild", if thats fizzeling out like Disco (which hip hop today on TV has turned into) or going underground like Punk rock did in the mid 1980's to be rejuvenated in the alternative rock movement of the 1990's, so be it, but for all intensive purposes Hip Hop is dying if not dead in 2007! (saleswise and Artistically)

To be honest alot of my friends and myself included who I would consider being hip-hop heads are turning to other genres of music over the last 2 years, Ie) Indie Rock or Electronic music, not due to not liking hip hop, but the fact that Hip Hop seems to have hit a creative wall, and frankly is not that interesting anymore

thoughts?

tical2000
03-05-2007, 07:06 PM
Has rap music hit a wall?

POSTED: 1953 GMT (0353 HKT), March 5, 2007


var clickExpire = "04/4/2007";Story Highlights

• Criticism of rap and hip-hop, from inside and out
• Sales of rap albums down
• But counterpoint from rapper: America likes rougher stuff
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NEW YORK (AP) -- Maybe it was the umpteenth coke-dealing anthem or soft-porn music video. Perhaps it was the preening antics that some call reminiscent of Stepin Fetchit.
The turning point is hard to pinpoint. But after 30 years of growing popularity, rap music is now struggling with an alarming sales decline and growing criticism from within about the culture's negative effect on society.
Rap insider Chuck Creekmur, who runs the leading Web site Allhiphop.com, says he got a message from a friend recently "asking me to hook her up with some Red Hot Chili Peppers because she said she's through with rap. A lot of people are sick of rap ... the negativity is just over the top now."
The rapper Nas, considered one of the greats, challenged the condition of the art form when he titled his latest album "Hip-Hop is Dead." It's at least ailing, according to recent statistics: Though music sales are down overall, rap sales slid a whopping 21 percent from 2005 to 2006, and for the first time in 12 years no rap album was among the top 10 sellers of the year.
A recent study by the Black Youth Project showed a majority of youth think rap has too many violent images. In a poll of black Americans by The Associated Press and AOL-Black Voices last year, 50 percent of respondents said hip-hop was a negative force in American society.
Nicole Duncan-Smith grew up on rap, worked in the rap industry for years and is married to a hip-hop producer. She still listens to rap, but says it no longer speaks to or for her. She wrote the children's book "I Am Hip-Hop" partly to create something positive about rap for young children, including her 4-year-old daughter.
"I'm not removed from it, but I can't really tell the difference between Young Jeezy and Yung Joc. It's the same dumb stuff to me," says Duncan-Smith, 33. "I can't listen to that nonsense ... I can't listen to another black man talk about you don't come to the 'hood anymore and ghetto revivals ... I'm from the 'hood. How can you tell me you want to revive it? How about you want to change it? Rejuvenate it?"
Hip-hop also seems to be increasingly blamed for a variety of social ills. Studies have attempted to link it to everything from teen drug use to increased sexual activity among young girls.
Even the mayhem that broke out in Las Vegas during last week's NBA All-Star Game was blamed on hip-hoppers. "(NBA Commissioner) David Stern seriously needs to consider moving the event out of the country for the next couple of years in hopes that young, hip-hop hoodlums would find another event to terrorize," columnist Jason Whitlock, who is black, wrote on AOL.
While rap has been in essence pop music for years, and most rap consumers are white, some worry that the black community is suffering from hip-hop -- from the way America perceives blacks to the attitudes and images being adopted by black youth.
'Look at the music that gets us popular'

But the rapper David Banner derides the growing criticism as blacks joining America's attack on young black men who are only reflecting the crushing problems within their communities. Besides, he says, that's the kind of music America wants to hear.
"Look at the music that gets us popular -- 'Like a Pimp,' " says Banner, naming his hit.
"What makes it so difficult is to know that we need to be doing other things. But the truth is at least us talking about what we're talking about, we can bring certain things to the light," he says. "They want (black artists) to shuck and jive, but they don't want us to tell the real story because they're connected to it."
Criticism of hip-hop is certainly nothing new -- it's as much a part of the culture as the beats and rhymes. Among the early accusations were that rap wasn't true music, its lyrics were too raw, its street message too polarizing. But they rarely came from the youthful audience itself, which was enraptured with genre that defined them as none other could.
"As people within the hip-hop generation get older, I think the criticism is increasing," says author Bakari Kitwana, who is currently part of a lecture tour titled "Does Hip-Hop Hate Women?"
"There was a more of a tendency when we were younger to be more defensive of it," he adds.
During her '90s crusade against rap's habit of degrading women, the late black activist C. Dolores Tucker certainly had few allies within the hip-hop community, or even among young black women. Backed by folks like conservative Republican William Bennett, Tucker was vilified within rap circles.
In retrospect, "many of us weren't listening," says Tracy Denean Sharpley-Whiting, a professor at Vanderbilt University and author of the new book "Pimps Up, Ho's Down: Hip-Hop's Hold On Young Black Women."
"She was onto something, but most of us said, 'They're not calling me a bitch, they're not talking about me, they're talking about THOSE women.' But then it became clear that, you know what? Those women can be any women."
One rap fan, Bryan Hunt, made the searing documentary "Hip-Hop: Beyond Beats and Rhymes," which debuted on PBS this month. Hunt addresses the biggest criticisms of rap, from its treatment of women to the glorification of the gangsta lifestyle that has become the default posture for many of today's most popular rappers.
"I love hip-hop," Hunt, 36, says in the documentary. "I sometimes feel bad for criticizing hip-hop, but I want to get us men to take a look at ourselves."
Even dances that may seem innocuous are not above the fray. Last summer, as the "Chicken Noodle Soup" song and accompanying dance became a sensation, Baltimore Sun pop critic Rashod D. Ollison mused that the dance -- demonstrated in the video by young people stomping wildly from side to side -- was part of the growing minstrelization of rap music.
"The music, dances and images in the video are clearly reminiscent of the era when pop culture reduced blacks to caricatures: lazy 'coons,' grinning 'pickaninnies,' sexually super-charged 'bucks,' " he wrote.
And then there's the criminal aspect that has long been a part of rap. In the '70s, groups may have rapped about drug dealing and street violence, but rap stars weren't the embodiment of criminals themselves. Today, the most popular and successful rappers boast about who has murdered more foes and rhyme about dealing drugs as breezily as other artists sing about love.
Creekmur says music labels have overfed the public on gangsta rap, obscuring artists who represent more positive and varied aspects of black life, like Talib Kweli, Common and Lupe Fiasco.
"It boils down to a complete lack of balance, and whenever there's a complete lack of balance people are going to reject it, whether it's positive or negative," Creekmur says.
Yet Banner says there's a reason why acts like KRS-One and Public Enemy don't sell anymore. He recalled that even his own fans rebuffed positive songs he made -- like "Cadillac on 22s," about staying away from street life -- in favor of songs like "Like a Pimp."
"The American public had an opportunity to pick what they wanted from David Banner," he says. "I wish America would just be honest. America is sick. ... America loves violence and sex."

from www.cnn.com (http://www.cnn.com)

Ghost In The 'Lac
03-05-2007, 07:44 PM
All these articles are written by people who dont know hip hop beyond 50 Cent or Joung Zeezy, they probably arent even aware of the underground .

50 Cent doesnt represent my hip hop, neither do even crossover things like the new Nas album, no real heads that used to be into smif and wessun and 90s shit like that listen to "hip hop is dead"

Its only just in this millenium we've had shit like Can Ox, Madilb and DOOM, electric Circus, The Roots keep bangin, cretivity is strong as ever, you just gotta know where to look

Jeru
03-05-2007, 07:54 PM
All these articles are written by people who dont know hip hop beyond 50 Cent or Joung Zeezy, they probably arent even aware of the underground .

50 Cent doesnt represent my hip hop, neither do even crossover things like the new Nas album, no real heads that used to be into smif and wessun and 90s shit like that listen to "hip hop is dead"

Its only just in this millenium we've had shit like Can Ox, Madilb and DOOM, electric Circus, The Roots keep bangin, cretivity is strong as ever, you just gotta know where to look

I love SMif 'n Wessun and the early up untill 97-98 hiphop, but I occasionally listen to HHID 2.You can't define a hiphop head by just one album.

Godbrother
03-05-2007, 08:01 PM
There is no problem with the HIPHOP culture(the people from all walks of life)

There is a problem with the HIPHOP Community(industry, artist, dj's, etc)

To be honest alot of my friends and myself included who I would consider being hip-hop heads are turning to other genres of music over the last 2 years, Ie) Indie Rock or Electronic music, not due to not liking hip hop, but the fact that Hip Hop seems to have hit a creative wall, and frankly is not that interesting anymore

Don't turn your back, if you are true you will stick it out

Godbrother
03-05-2007, 08:29 PM
Money, Fame, and attention(spotlight, recognition) should not be awarded to everyone in Hiphop so easily

Some of these individuals don't speak for me or you

This qoute came from this animated movie Fist of the North Star

What good is POWER without PERCEPTION

jagged philosopher
03-05-2007, 08:50 PM
although the ppl writing these articles are speaking about mainstream rap like 50 cent ppl have to b aware that the mainstream projects an image on the whole. that is if youre not a hip hop fan and u see 50 cent rappin about fuckin bitches and killin niggas ur going to think thats wat rap is about. wat hip hop needs is someone positive but also popular. all the political activist/postive rappers arent mainstream. america needs 1 who is

TAURO
03-05-2007, 08:59 PM
I was hoping Nas could be that shining example in mainstream hip hop because he is respected as a whole in the culture and appeals to a broad audience.

Visionz
03-05-2007, 09:13 PM
David Stern seriously needs to consider moving the event out of the country for the next couple of years in hopes that young, hip-hop hoodlums would find another event to terrorize," columnist Jason Whitlock, who is black, wrote on AOLfor the record Jason's a whiny lil' fag who had nothing positive to say about Vince Young. its kinda off the subject, but with all criticism, you gotta consider the source. Any commercial setbacks hip-hop takes at the stands will help in the type of artist a label is willing to sign. They'll realize they can't play it safe anymore.

tical2000
03-05-2007, 10:18 PM
Don't turn your back, if you are true you will stick it out

to be honest I will always like hip hop, over the last 4-5 years though I have lost interest, the watered down commericalization and the lack of creativity is pushing me away...

Todays rap climate reminds me of when ROCK music went from LED ZEPPELIN and ROLLING STONES in the early 1970's to fuckin REO SPEEDWAGON and LOVERBOY in the late 1970's.....rap music today is watered down

PuNcH_iN_PuNcH_OuT
03-05-2007, 10:29 PM
allot of the artits that I want to here can't get there albums out - 2006 was supposed to be so much more

where the fuck was slick ricks album?

brown_dogg
03-05-2007, 11:20 PM
Kinda sucks that this is where hip hop is heading to.. Even with all the underground acts, not much is gonna change. As long as the rappers are making money off mainstream hiphop, then that's what's gonna be representing hiphop.

11th Chamber
03-06-2007, 12:08 AM
The unfortunete thing is, is that since record sales are so low, people are gonna start judging how good an album is, based on the sales.

50 isnt gonna sell 7-9 mil. on his next joint like he used to(no one is), so when he just sells 3-5 mil. people are gonna use that against him

maestro wooz
03-06-2007, 01:14 AM
to be honest I will always like hip hop, over the last 4-5 years though I have lost interest, the watered down commericalization and the lack of creativity is pushing me away...

Todays rap climate reminds me of when ROCK music went from LED ZEPPELIN and ROLLING STONES in the early 1970's to fuckin REO SPEEDWAGON and LOVERBOY in the late 1970's.....rap music today is watered down


exactly, its just a phase. As long as it stays alive it will go through good periods again.

There are still alot of people pushing the envelope out there. MF Doom, madlib, bronze nazareth, and maybe cilvaringz, to name a few, are new artists that are still doing great things. There just isn't that much out there right there.

chiba
03-06-2007, 01:29 AM
for real i dont know how soo much commercial albums are doing good
i know ppl that havnt bought an album since cd burners and napster existed


i an artist has 1 good song on their album and the rest suck
ppl will download the 1 song
why spend 10-20$ on an album that has 1 good track

anywayz ppl are always complaining about the state of hip hop
where are the founders?? the elders gotta step in here
the only elder that has the nuts to say something is KRS ONE
nelly tried to get at him and krs one destroyed him lyrically

its the young ppl and the club ppl who are suckered into commercail hip hop
ya gotta school dem ppl coz they are not raised with legends like rakim , big daddy kane, biggie, pun, 2pac, slick rick, wu tang, tribe, de la soul etc

i work as a dj and to be honest nobody is gonna dance to protect ya neck
ppl dont even dance to old school
but put on young jeezy, lil jon, gunit etc they will dance thier asses off

mainstream hip hop is bullshiet
but what can you do??? everyone has been complaining for the last 7-10 years it hasnt changed anything

i hate seeing bling vids
the girls replaced the bboys, the bling replaced the graff, and the dj nowhere to be seen

also, if your poor and some dude comes at you with a contract sayin
u get like 50 million $$ for doing a bling video and a mainstream album
im pretty sure you would jump on it
just ask jkwon
lol

tical2000
03-06-2007, 02:25 AM
for real i dont know how soo much commercial albums are doing good
i know ppl that havnt bought an album since cd burners and napster existed


i an artist has 1 good song on their album and the rest suck
ppl will download the 1 song
why spend 10-20$ on an album that has 1 good track

anywayz ppl are always complaining about the state of hip hop
where are the founders?? the elders gotta step in here
the only elder that has the nuts to say something is KRS ONE
nelly tried to get at him and krs one destroyed him lyrically

its the young ppl and the club ppl who are suckered into commercail hip hop
ya gotta school dem ppl coz they are not raised with legends like rakim , big daddy kane, biggie, pun, 2pac, slick rick, wu tang, tribe, de la soul etc

i work as a dj and to be honest nobody is gonna dance to protect ya neck
ppl dont even dance to old school
but put on young jeezy, lil jon, gunit etc they will dance thier asses off

mainstream hip hop is bullshiet
but what can you do??? everyone has been complaining for the last 7-10 years it hasnt changed anything

i hate seeing bling vids
the girls replaced the bboys, the bling replaced the graff, and the dj nowhere to be seen

also, if your poor and some dude comes at you with a contract sayin
u get like 50 million $$ for doing a bling video and a mainstream album
im pretty sure you would jump on it
just ask jkwon
lol

You are saying that nobody would dance to WU TANG, that is the point Wu Tang was not some dance pop act and did not try and make dance music, they made raw hip hop......HIP HOP never used to be disco music for the clubs, sure people would break dance to it, but thats the problem today in 2007, Hip Hop has turned into dance-pop.....they dont ever release raw singles anymore, its almost 100% dance songs released as singles....

Today you would never see a song as raw as "protect your neck" get play on MTV as it did back in 1993......the lables need to mix it up, all you get on TV and radio is the same pop dance track over and over, and start having some balance release some dance tracks, but bring some gritty songs as well

Edgar Erebus
03-06-2007, 05:06 PM
All these articles are written by people who dont know hip hop beyond 50 Cent or Joung Zeezy, they probably arent even aware of the underground .

50 Cent doesnt represent my hip hop, neither do even crossover things like the new Nas album, no real heads that used to be into smif and wessun and 90s shit like that listen to "hip hop is dead"

Its only just in this millenium we've had shit like Can Ox, Madilb and DOOM, electric Circus, The Roots keep bangin, cretivity is strong as ever, you just gotta know where to look

Underground isn't defining hip-hop music. Even today there are people that do psychedelic rock in the underground, but they aren't on the radio, and what's most important, they can't change shit. If MF Doom makes a revolution in hip-hop without attaining comercial success, I will admit I'm a stupid.

Destroyed and rebuilt? Mmmmm... nah, there's gonna be a new kind of music, based on hip-hop (like hip-hop is based on disco, check origins of it before you crucify me), but I dunno what could be rawer and streeter, knawImean?

Or maybe there is going to be a new revolutionary phase... for that it's needed to change mind of youth, cause 90% of teens today are only and exclusively about materialistic shit.

CharlesJones
03-06-2007, 05:21 PM
You know what disturbs me? Whites are buying rap music more than blacks. That's sad. White people are the main ones dissing rap music talking about it's garbage but they're buying the cd's and they're at the concerts more than blacks. What's up with that? I agree with David Banner that america is sick and like he said, america loves sex and violence. Like David said, he did a positive song which was Caddilac On 22's but nobody paid attention to that song. Like A Pimp is his most popular song like he said because the song talks about ignorance and the people who are buying the music love ignorant lyrics. The fans don't wanna hear positive lyrics.

11th Chamber
03-06-2007, 10:09 PM
^^^'Like A Pimp' was hot tho

rubyspirit
03-06-2007, 10:14 PM
WTF? I dance to Wu-tang music all the time.


So it seems Hip-Hop has hit a wall artistically and commercially,
NOT! Stick with the Wu and stop looking at outsiders.

chiba
03-06-2007, 11:39 PM
ahah
i aint baddin the wu
only die hard wu fans or ppl with hip hop knowledge would respect wu tracks (and other tracks)
like rza say he makes beats to rhyme to and not beats to dance to

im just sayin from experience
u cant play wu tang at a club unless its like gravelpit, cherchez la ghost, pinky ring, I gotcha money,
even then ppl dont really rush the dance floor like when you play for example young jeezy akon or 50 cent

trust me on this, i work as a dj and if i dont play the hip pop id wouldnt have my job right now, it would give the club a bad name coz ppl go to clubs to dance drink and have fun (and sometimes start a fight here n there lol)
if i play wu and my boss says switch it coz ppl aint dancing and are leavin i have no choice but to play the hip pop. the club would get a bad rep and wouldnt attract alot of ppl, that decreases the $$ .

thats just the way it is, trust me it hurts that i cant play records like souls of mischief, de la soul , roots, wu tang, boot camp click
my old school hip hop set lasts about 10 mins thats crap compared to my reggae sets that last about 30 -45 mins and the hip pop that lasts about 30 - 45 mins and the rnb that lasts about 20 mins

peace

maestro wooz
03-07-2007, 02:31 AM
WTF? I dance to Wu-tang music all the time.


So it seems Hip-Hop has hit a wall artistically and commercially,
NOT! Stick with the Wu and stop looking at outsiders.



:nerdy: :nerdy:

DJMethods
03-07-2007, 03:34 AM
The thing that ruined hip-hop - MONEY. Ever notice how every MC talks about making money? Even the Wu do it.. and shit pisses me off. Sure, it's a job, earn your living, but that's whats ruining hip-hop.

When Kool Herc, GM Flash where rockin parties in the Bronx, what were they doing it for? They just did it for respect and to be the best DJ. Making money is fine, it's GOOD, means that you'll be able to promote more and so on, but if your goal in making hip-hop is to make money, that isn't hip-hop.

It's why I respect the underground dudes. They get fuck all money, and they are truely releasing the dopest shit. The only problem I have is, they don't get the promotion because of the lack of money, and the fact they don't want to be mainstream.. They have the capacity to really change hip-hop for the better, but MTV and other stations (Radio and TV) won't play them them because they're scared. Scared of change, when really, if people were scared of change... there would be no such thing as hip-hop in the first place.

Give them a chance.. Seriously, why play club banging shit on TV? Who the fuck stands in their lounge room dancing around to club bangers on TV? There are a lot of talent MC's out there that are getting slept on worldwide because nobody will play them, true heads will recognise the dope shit. True heads don't only listen to hip-hop when clubbing, they listen to it in all situations and all moods, play some real hip-hop!

AcidPhosphate69
03-07-2007, 03:53 AM
This happens to every genre that's ever been hugely successful. Look at rock and roll in the late 70's early 80's...it was a big surprise that some of these bands were blowing up and making it big. But once they one got big, record companies scrambled to sign all the others. Then, once a formula for a hit record was used and proven (in this case, first single is a hard song...second is a power ballad) every single band started doing it. Maybe not because they wanted to but because the record companies pretty much force them to sometimes. Either way, cheesey cookie cutter hair/glam metal was born.

There is hope though. It all comes in cycles. Grunge came around and destroyed hair metal. I bet something raw is going to come around and destroy pop-hop. I can pretty much garuantee the next big thing is gonna be something that's underground right now, it may not be rap but at least it'll get this whack ass shit giving rap a bad name to just lay down and die.

Tito
03-07-2007, 03:55 AM
Save The Underground.. !!! Save The Underground.. !!!

Save It.. !!! That Is The Key.. !!

We Are The Future.. ! Like Planet Rock


Late

2L8Lit da croatianMC
03-07-2007, 04:34 AM
You are saying that nobody would dance to WU TANG, that is the point Wu Tang was not some dance pop act and did not try and make dance music, they made raw hip hop......HIP HOP never used to be disco music for the clubs, sure people would break dance to it, but thats the problem today in 2007, Hip Hop has turned into dance-pop.....they dont ever release raw singles anymore, its almost 100% dance songs released as singles....

Today you would never see a song as raw as "protect your neck" get play on MTV as it did back in 1993......the lables need to mix it up, all you get on TV and radio is the same pop dance track over and over, and start having some balance release some dance tracks, but bring some gritty songs as well

Actually, people do dance ot Protect Ya Neck. They play the shit sometimes in "Aquarius" and people feelin it and bang their heads and dance, so that aint true, nobody gonna dance on it.

RAMESH
03-07-2007, 04:45 AM
hip hop is far from dead you need not look further than the clan evrything you need is here from underground to comercial there is a few other artists that shine outside the clan but they all dispenssable, wouldn't make a big diffrence to me if they existed or not fuck hip hop it's wu-tang always has been

tical2000
03-07-2007, 05:34 PM
Actually, people do dance ot Protect Ya Neck. They play the shit sometimes in "Aquarius" and people feelin it and bang their heads and dance, so that aint true, nobody gonna dance on it.

my point was that the WU TANG was not trying to make dance music, they were trying to make raw hip hop

PuNcH_iN_PuNcH_OuT
03-07-2007, 06:03 PM
sells don't mean shit in comparison to quality hip hop. How much was hip hop selling in the early - mid 90 compared to now?

staycreepin_n_silence
03-07-2007, 06:12 PM
stop downloading and start buying.


I think it has more to do with economics than artistic and commercialism. you guys debate this issue and gets nowhere.

chiba
03-08-2007, 12:07 AM
Seriously, why play club banging shit on TV? Who the fuck stands in their lounge room dancing around to club bangers on TV?

you would be surprized *D

i notice your name starts with DJ
;) u kno what its like

maestro wooz
03-08-2007, 01:24 AM
There is hope though. It all comes in cycles. Grunge came around and destroyed hair metal. I bet something raw is going to come around and destroy pop-hop. I can pretty much garuantee the next big thing is gonna be something that's underground right now, it may not be rap but at least it'll get this whack ass shit giving rap a bad name to just lay down and die.

that's what im saying. Hip hop is a brand new genre, theres gonna be changes in the direction it goes.

madstyles
03-08-2007, 04:06 PM
Has it really? It's just boring for the most part but theres always a few albums that keep it interesting.

Just because you can dance to something doesn't mean that it isin't raw hip hop...36 chambers is one of the rawest records ever but people can still vibe to it at a party or whatever.

Treazon
03-08-2007, 07:29 PM
if your really a fan of hip-hop then you'll be able to find enough shit to satisfy yourself every year, thats for sure... if your a fake fan getting disinterested because you've seen the same music video 5000 times on BET by god knows how many cloned rappers then fuck it, glad to have them gone. if theres less people buying shitty commercial music out there.. maybe rap's image will return to what it started out as.. atleast im hopeful of that.

but whatever happens... rap wont completely die out.. but like so many other genres in history it makes sense that it would give way to another type, whatever it may be..


peace

Butter
03-08-2007, 07:29 PM
depends on who your listening to.

staycreepin_n_silence
03-09-2007, 01:47 PM
I think hiphop site has hit the wall with worthy topics to debate

White_Mouse
03-09-2007, 05:05 PM
well...i beleive 1/2 of "LPG" (less known underground group) "Jerny Big" said it best in their last album "The Gadfly"
"it used to be that the style you had was yours/
and not a formula for record stores//"