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View Full Version : Comercialism, Necessary Evil?


TAURO
06-01-2007, 06:02 PM
After what I said over at the KRS, 50 Cent thread I started to think about a few things. It all came to me while I was watching the Hell Razah dvd which came with the album. Razah was going on about bringing that raw hip hop with knowledge and I started to think, here's an mc that's been around a while and after all this time he still has that passion and that hunger, is it possible that if comercial rap as we know it didn't exist, would we still get the type of hip hop from underground cats?. Does comercial hip hop need to exist to provide a counter-balance so that the underground maintains that focus and hunger?. If that is the case then maybe we shouldn't be so hard on these comercial cats because in a funny way they are keeping underground hip hop alive.

I just want to make it clear that this is not necessarily my opinion, it's just a thought I had.
What to people think? is there some logic to this? or is it all just bullshit?....your thoughts.

MaXiMus Da MaNtis
06-01-2007, 06:57 PM
yo know your my homie........but thatz bullshit......mid 9o's is a prime example......commercialism is just what women want....and niggas want women so hence dance fever music is all over....its what the industry feed the people.....


and that KRS thing.....he was paid to go on a show and as a man representing hip hop....he's gotta be mature about certain aspects of the game a leader sort of speak....plus he's lost....like so many cats from the past .......sort of like givin up .....

GhostfaceThaPharoahe
06-02-2007, 11:29 AM
that actually makes sense in a way, but its not like if there was no more "commercialism" then there would be no more good or "underground" music

UNCLE RUCKUS
06-02-2007, 12:25 PM
I would argue that is in fact an unecessary evil now.
but in the last tiimes you are right on

11th Chamber
06-02-2007, 12:26 PM
and that KRS thing.....he was paid to go on a show and as a man representing hip hop....he's gotta be mature about certain aspects of the game a leader sort of speak....plus he's lost....like so many cats from the past .......sort of like givin up .....

word. I was just thinkin bout this like "damn, I wonder how many people watchin this video or watchin rap city got no idea who this cat talkin to 50 is"

Onto Tauro's first post, I honestly think that Commercial Hip Hop does help underground hip hop, cause those who dont feel the commercial shit can go directly into the underground shit. Just like in any other music genre. If there was only underground hip hop, and people wasent to into it, then they might just abandon hip hop all together. Same thing for commercial hip hop.

As a listener of both Commercial and Underground hip-hop, I like that there is a somewhat difference between the two.

I dont even kno if I just made any sense, im pretty high and tryin to make a good discussion

OTB
06-02-2007, 12:29 PM
Guide Us Not Into Temptation!!

Edgar Erebus
06-02-2007, 02:13 PM
The problem is that the line between hardcore and commercial is being blurred. KRS is a good example of this. Just look how was it in early 90's - commercial cats as Hammer, Vanilla Ice and P.M. Dawn were literally crucified by hardcore hip-hop fans (especially by KRS).

In mid '90-s there was this panic of selling out, like, many people liked Pac's AEOM of Biggie's Life After Death, but at the same time they were constantly under attack as being too commercial. Not to mention that real commercials like Diddy weren't respected by the "underground" audience - but KRS nevertheless made a collabo with Diddy.

And now we got Cam'Ron, we got 50 Cent and D-Block, which are as commercial-inclined as most of those rappers I mentioned, but now they they ARE hardcore, like they ARE underground with all this buzz and mixtapes and shit. KRS stands with 50 Cent in front of the cameras, shakes his hands and justifies his type of music.

Dig the point?

UNCLE RUCKUS
06-02-2007, 02:29 PM
*; The problem is that the line between hardcore and commercial is being blurred. KRS is a good example of this. Just look how was it in early 90's - commercial cats as Hammer, Vanilla Ice and P.M. Dawn were literally crucified by hardcore hip-hop fans (especially by KRS).

In mid '90-s there was this panic of selling out, like, many people liked Pac's AEOM of Biggie's Life After Death, but at the same time they were constantly under attack as being too commercial. Not to mention that real commercials like Diddy weren't respected by the "underground" audience - but KRS nevertheless made a collabo with Diddy.

And now we got Cam'Ron, we got 50 Cent and D-Block, which are as commercial-inclined as most of those rappers I mentioned, but now they they ARE hardcore, like they ARE underground with all this buzz and mixtapes and shit. KRS stands with 50 Cent in front of the cameras, shakes his hands and justifies his type of music.

Dig the point?
who gives a flying-monkey yo
not the point at all

THE W
06-02-2007, 06:00 PM
i doubt "commercial rap" had much influence on where hell razah wanted to go with his music.