PDA

View Full Version : Massive Wire-Taps Authorized Prior to 9/11


Visionz
10-18-2007, 01:51 AM
A former telecom executive told us that efforts to obtain call details go back to early 2001, predating the 9/11 attacks and the president's now celebrated secret executive order. The source, who asked not to be identified so as not to out his former company, reports that the NSA approached U.S. carriers and asked for their cooperation in a "data-mining" operation, which might eventually cull "millions" of individual calls and emails.

http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2007/10/qwest-ceo-not-a.html


you mean they where planning on spying on the entire nation before the "terrorist" attacks??

how do yall feel about that?

Visionz
10-18-2007, 02:26 AM
When the Greek ambassador objected to President Johnson's plan for settling a dispute concerning Cyprus, LBJ told him, "Fuck your parliament and your constitution. America is an elephant. Cyprus is a flea. Greece is a flea. If these two fleas continue itching the elephant, they may just get whacked by the elephant's trunk, whacked good....If your prime minister gives me talk about democracy, parliament and constitutions, he, his parliament and his constitution may not last very long."the US has no interest in parity on a global scale

7EL7
10-18-2007, 03:43 AM
no surprise

people are changing

they ain't using flouride or eating paint chips anymore

so they have to find other ways to make people slow

so that they can maintain control over them

the skeptic says "ah man, no one is trying to control the people with these things"

the skeptic is right

they ain't trying to control the people

100pr00f
10-18-2007, 09:42 AM
i dont care about wire taps

i mean what do i have to hide

they here me talking dirty to a girl..who cares .it aint like the fbio are gonna show up and say nice one man .ur girl gave me a hard on

haha

..

peace

beautifulrock
10-18-2007, 10:20 AM
I think they have been doing this since J. Edgar Hoover ran the FBI, you think this is new?

Visionz
10-18-2007, 04:55 PM
i dont care about wire taps

i mean what do i have to hide

they here me talking dirty to a girl..who cares .it aint like the fbio are gonna show up and say nice one man .ur girl gave me a hard on

haha

..

peaceso because you personally feel you have nothing to hide makes it OK? the scope of what defines a terrorist in the Patriot Act is broader than most realize. Being labeled a terrorist can subject you to imprisonment without trial or representation, fun,fun, for everyone. In this day and age you can be a terrorist without even knowing it. Don't be so sure that you have nothing to hide.

I think they have been doing this since J. Edgar Hoover ran the FBI, you think this is new? in principle, no not really, but the scale with which they're operating is unprecedented.


9/11 was the supposed reason for the massive wiretaps in the first place, how do you plan a reaction for something before it happens when you have no foreknowledge of what's about to take place?

beautifulrock
10-18-2007, 05:02 PM
Being labeled a terrorist can subject you to imprisonment without trial or representation, fun,fun, for everyone.


not exactly true, that is the statute for war criminals, not citizens of this country, in fact even those captured in this country that are "illegal" have the same rights as American Citizens, just look at the Moussawi trial. He was a terrorist captured in this country and he had better representation than most who pay for lawyers.

Visionz
10-19-2007, 12:35 AM
not exactly true, that is the statute for war criminals, not citizens of this country, in fact even those captured in this country that are "illegal" have the same rights as American Citizens, just look at the Moussawi trial. He was a terrorist captured in this country and he had better representation than most who pay for lawyers.

Guess lawyers like the media attention. You are right. I had to go back and re-read that shit. Bills are written in a very strange manner, alot of the patriot act consist of amendments to law that where already in place.


With that being the case, what do you think about Guantanamo Bay?

7EL7
10-19-2007, 01:07 AM
they confirm their control over the people when they tell the people they are violating the people, and the people do nothing

Visionz
10-19-2007, 01:12 AM
they confirm their control over the people when they tell the people they are violating the people, and the people do nothingthat's very true, I feel helpless in any attempts to change anymore than my immediate surroundings. I just try to do what I can

maestro wooz
10-19-2007, 03:05 AM
[JURIST] The US Senate Intelligence Committee [official website] Thursday debated a draft bill that would grant immunity from prosecution to telecommunications companies [JURIST report] that assisted in government eavesdropping between 2001 and 2007. The bill, which would amend the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act [text], also includes a provision requiring the attorney general to certify that probable cause exists to suspect that an American is engaged in activities against the United States before the government can initiate surveillance. President Bush has threatened to veto any surveillance bill that does not include immunity provisions for telecom companies that assisted in government eavesdropping. AP has more.

On Wednesday, House Democrats withdrew [JURIST report] the RESTORE Act of 2007 ("Responsible Electronic Surveillance That is Overseen, Reviewed and Effective Act of 2007") [HR 3773 summary; HJC summary, PDF] from the House floor for consideration after Republicans moved to attach an amendment to the bill which would have been politically awkward for Democrats to reject, providing that nothing in the measure would prevent the government from spying on Osama Bin Laden or other terrorist organizations. The RESTORE Act was intended to replace the temporary Protect America Act [S 1927 materials], signed in August, as the law governing foreign surveillance.

http://jurist.law.pitt.edu/paperchase/2007/10/us-senate-committee-debates.php

maestro wooz
10-26-2007, 04:52 AM
[JURIST] The White House Thursday agreed to let US Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT) and ranking Republican Sen. Arlen Specter (R-PA) [official websites] see classified documents pertaining to President George W. Bush's warrantless domestic surveillance program [JURIST news archive], in hopes that it would speed up the approval of proposed legislation to grant telecommunications companies immunity from prosecution [JURIST report] for assisting in government eavesdropping between 2001 and 2007. Leahy, however, has insisted that the entire committee be allowed to view the documents before he will consider endorsing the immunity provisions, and other committee members have followed suit. Bush has threatened to veto any revised surveillance bill that does not include the immunity provisions.

Leahy and Specter sent a letter [PDF text] Monday to White House counsel Fred Fielding demanding the Bush administration comply with subpoenas [press release] for information about the warrantless domestic surveillance program. The committee formally subpoenaed the documents on June 27 in regards to proposed legislation to amend the 1978 Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) [text; JURIST news archive]. The subpoenas mentioned in Leahy's and Specter's letter cover documents and information relevant to the legislation planned by Congress to amend FISA permanently. Leahy and Specter have criticized the White House for sharing some documents on the program with the Senate Intelligence Committee, which debated [JURIST report] and approved the Senate version of the bill last week, while keeping them from the Judiciary Committee. AP has more.

Visionz
10-26-2007, 05:11 AM
Bush has threatened to veto any revised surveillance bill that does not include the immunity provisions. Bush sure does play dumb but that muthafucka is constantly trying to pass laws to protect himself legally when that empire comes crumbling down

x.l.nc
10-26-2007, 02:09 PM
you.. dont.. say.