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View Full Version : War against terror = Currency war?


iniquity
07-11-2008, 07:33 PM
. between the dollar & the euro . ? .

Giflord
07-11-2008, 07:51 PM
the war has something to do with the weak dollar but basically the US has borrowed so much money for the war and also the consumers for bullshit 85 like purchases (savage in pursuit...). both the government and the consumers are heavily leveraged which means they make 1 dollar and spend 2.

this devalues our currency because we print too much money and we also borrow from other countries. the war is a big piece of the weak dollar, they say we there for oil but im still paying 5$ a gallon fucking bulllshit

TSA
07-11-2008, 11:53 PM
yeah, at this point im beginning to realize it wasn't an elaborate shadow plot for grand purposes of power and dominance like some say, and more a HUGE poorly thought out mistake.

the motives behind it a more then likely as simplistic as the government presents, there has been and never could be and postive gain from this whatsoever

Visionz
07-13-2008, 05:51 PM
the war has something to do with the weak dollar but basically the US has borrowed so much money for the war and also the consumers for bullshit 85 like purchases (savage in pursuit...). both the government and the consumers are heavily leveraged which means they make 1 dollar and spend 2.

this devalues our currency because we print too much money and we also borrow from other countries. the war is a big piece of the weak dollar, they say we there for oil but im still paying 5$ a gallon fucking bulllshit

the US doesn't actually borrow much, if any currency from other countries. It borrows it from the Federal Reserve, which is fucked up cause they're also printing it. In essence the government doesn't even actually own its own money so ever dollar printed is a loan we're paying interest on. This is where much of the national debt comes from and the war-mongering and its effects which you've mentioned only worsen the situation.

yeah, at this point im beginning to realize it wasn't an elaborate shadow plot for grand purposes of power and dominance like some say, and more a HUGE poorly thought out mistake.

the motives behind it a more then likely as simplistic as the government presents, there has been and never could be and postive gain from this whatsoeverwhen has anything involving the government ever been as simplistic as its presented? And no positive gains?? Take a look at the oil companies profit margins right now, you only have to follow the money to see what this war is really about.


Campaign contributions aren't a donation, they're an investment for future policy. Bush and his cronies have ben playing back scratch for the last eight years at the consequence of the america public. We can only hope for a trial of high treason when his ass is out.

TSA
07-13-2008, 06:10 PM
i really think it was as dumb and as poorly presented as is. Sure, maybe they were trying to get a little oil money

Visionz
07-13-2008, 08:02 PM
i really think it was as dumb and as poorly presented as is. Sure, maybe they were trying to get a little oil moneylockheed martin, united defense, haliburton, every oil company etc, there's a lot of fat cats who are getting even fatter with this war. Let's not forget that the country was convinced into this bullshit at a very sensitive moment with a lot of suspect information that was intentionally blown WAY outta proportion with the aim to deceive. If a 100,000 dead for the sake of profit margins doesn't move the masses to righteous outrage, what will???

Trismegistos
07-15-2008, 10:11 AM
I think it was a given that the Euro was going to become stronger than the dollar.

The US has been in a "slow rot" recession since 2001 and this recession is not solely the fault of the September 11 attacks. Companies like Enron & Worldcom collapsed independent of terrorism and the same in Australia where there were substantial (in terms of Australian companies) collapses of Ansett, HIH and Onetel.

The current situation in the US will continue for several more years and there will still be a steep decline in the value of the US dollar.

In my opinion the US dollar will never again have the strength that it had prior to 2001. The only recovery will come when the US commits to the Amero.

There are a number of factors at play.

1) Poor economic management and excessive over valuation of wealth

2) An elite wealthy sector that has for years been abandoning the US economy and shifting their wealth predominantly to the European Union states and some Asian economies.

Anyone interested in making a dollar could even buy Australian dollars because they will hit parity with the US dollar in the next 6-12 months.

Edgar Erebus
07-15-2008, 12:36 PM
lockheed martin, united defense, haliburton, every oil company etc, there's a lot of fat cats who are getting even fatter with this war. Let's not forget that the country was convinced into this bullshit at a very sensitive moment with a lot of suspect information that was intentionally blown WAY outta proportion with the aim to deceive.

Ditto.



If a 100,000 dead for the sake of profit margins doesn't move the masses to righteous outrage, what will???

'Bout outrage: as long as there's 100 dead Iraqis for every dead American, nothing'll move masses from sitting in their couch with chocolate candies and turning the channel to MTV when news appear.

As long as the parole of a day is: "I don't support the war but I support the soldiers", nothing'll move masses from sipping sizzurp and skipping "Tie My Hands".

STYLE
07-16-2008, 06:14 PM
US borrows $665 billion annually from foreign lenders
#1 Japan
#2 China

Visionz
07-16-2008, 11:54 PM
US borrows $665 billion annually from foreign lenders
#1 Japan
#2 ChinaDAMN!!! those are shocking numbers, I was under the impression it was the world banks, is that through the purchasing of bonds or something different? I knew there was a point where China was buying in the neighborhood of $250 billion in bonds but I don't know if that falls into some other kind of category, investment-type shit.