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View Full Version : Tech N9ne: Organized Confusion


Fatal Guillotine
08-04-2008, 07:48 PM
Source:hiphopdx.com http://cdn.hiphopdx.com//images/features/200807FTECH9_160x240.jpg
Tech N9ne is crazy. And, just for clarification, this is not the funny, Martin Lawrence, ďyou so crazy,Ē type of crazy. Itís closer to the Britney Spears, shaving her head without any panties on, type of crazy. At least, thatís what Tech wants you to think. It seems like the only logical way to explain the bright, red hair, the straight jacket and the frequent use of the words ďpsychoĒ and, yes, ďcrazy.Ē
Over the course of 11 albums, Tech N9ne has put his entire life on wax. He openly pens gut-wrenching lyrics about his own insecurity, infidelity, drug use and vanity. The global fan response is undeniable, and with his latest effort, Killer, debuting at number 12 on the Billboard 200, Tech will likely become the first Hip Hop artist to sell a million albums independently. A more globalized economy and the impending implosion of the recording industry could bring the mainstream recognition that Tech N9ne has been craving for decades. Any emcee in a similar position would have to be certifiably crazy to even think about quitting at this point, right? Of course.
HipHopDX: You say you wrote this entire album during a 30 day tour, so you mustíve had a lot on your mind.
Tech N9ne: I did all those songs in like a month, man. Once I stopped doing that Ecstasy, it opened up a whole new world. I swear to God I almost died. I took like 15 pills in one night. Iíve been clean for about a year or so. Since I stopped that, itís like a whole new ballgame opened up in my brain. I have different subject matter and everything now.
Itís insanity. I thought with Everready, I had said everythingówith ďThe Rain/Welcome Back/Party HardĒ [click to read] and my little girl and everything. I had ďMy WorldĒ with Brotha Lynch Hung [click to read], and I thought it couldnít get any better than that. But, I was still on that drug then. You know what Iím sizzliní? Iím not saying that held me back or nothing, because a lot of beautiful material came out of that. Now look what a clean me brought. There are titles like ďHope For A Higher Power,Ē ďCry Baby,Ē ďCanít Shake ItĒ and ďWhy You Ainít Call Me.Ē This is stuff Iíve never addressed before. Itís shit that Iíve been wanting to say to Jay-Z [click to read], Nelly, Ludacris [click to read] and all these cats that Iíve toured with. Thereís shit that I had wanted to say, and it finally came out.
DX: Early in your career Quincy Jones told you, ďRap what you know and people will forever feel you.Ē Is this Killer album cover a way of paying homage to him?
Tech N9ne: Yes I am. Itís for Quincy and Michael [Jackson], because Iím affiliated with Quincy. They used to always call me "the Michael Jackson of rap" back when I was signed with Qwest and Warner. They called me that because they thought I was lyrically eliteóone of the top [emcees], if not the top, even if the whole world doesnít know it yet. I had the idea to do that for a long time and now I think I have the mind and spirit to carry that out. Killer is what came out of that.
DX: Thriller moved over 30 million units and youíre on the verge of moving one million independently. Whatís you mind state as you approach that milestone?
TN: Iíve got high hopes, man. Iíve been having high hopes. Itís like the Jim Carrey syndrome, when he got that first role in Batman [Forever] playing The Riddler. They asked him in one interview if he was ecstatic or surprised that they offered him $25 million, and he was like, ďNo. Iíve been waiting on this my whole life.Ē
Iíve been planning this all my life, so I have high hopes for this. Thatís why the album has a chip on its shoulder, because I have been doing elite music since I started. But, only a handful of motherfuckers get it. I feel like Iím making music for the world. Being independent is a hard task. You donít see me on TV or hear me on the radio, yet I have all of these fans. My fans are the world. I want to be global and thatís why the album has a chip on its shoulder. Thatís why Iím like, ďThis is my last album and yíall donít get it. You niggas donít get it.Ē Thatís why the album kind of feels like thatÖwell, not kind of. It hella feels like that, because thatís how I hella feel. Quincy said, ďRap what you know and people will forever feel you.Ē This is what I know. I know that Iím frustrated. I know that this shit is elite.
DX: You can chill with Quincy Jones or Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis, you have fans with your face tattooed on them and youíve got money. Are just you frustrated because you feel your peers donít recognize?
TN: Yeah. A lot of these cats donít know me because they donít see me on TV. Thatís where everybody gets discovered. Kid Rock got discovered at the MTV Awards. Everybody saw Motown 25 when Michael Jackson did ďBilly JeanĒ and the Moonwalk. Itís that dummy tube. We ainít on it, but look what weíve built without that. Weíre still chasing it. They better not let me get on that TV, Omar. If they do, Iím taking it allótheir women and everything else


This is something different from Tech N9ne because Iím a different cat. When they see and hear me itís gonna be a new day. A lot of niggas say that like, ďIím gonna change the game and blah, blah, blah.Ē Nah, I ainít saying that. If I happen to change the game, then praise the Lord. But, Iíve got to get into these peopleís hearts and minds.
What makes my story so important? What makes me so important? Why should they buy my album? Because Iím an inside-out nigga. I ainít afraid to let people know whatís going on inside of me without fabricating shit and holding my face tight. Some people do that as a defense mechanism. I walk around here with red bandana shoes. Thatís like screaming, ďNigga come kill me.Ē And, Iím a smart guy.
DX: I gotta say, Tech. Thatís one hell of a contradiction.
TN: The [wearing] red thingÖI donít want my kids to lose me to that either. Thatís stupid nigga shit. But, this is all I know. When it comes to my homies and my hood, this is who taught me how to be a man and take care of my family. I was taught to do anything to take care of my family. How can I shake that? Thatís the only negative thing that plagues me to this day. Everybody wants to belong to something. I wish as black people, and even the people they call trailer trash, I wish we could belong to something way more positive. Iíd much rather me be a Kappa [Alpha Psi]. But the [Bloods] who were running from the cops in í85 moved into our neighborhood. Thatís one of the only things that plague me to this day. Well, that and the fact that I owe the IRS a little money. [Laughs]
But, youíre gonna hear confusion in my album. Youíre going to hear grown-up shit and everything else too. I am inside-out, and thatís what makes me so special. What I mean by inside-out is letting my fans experience everything that Iím thinking. When they meet me they realize Iím that same guy theyíve been listening to the whole time. When chicks meet me they go, ďThatís that dude Iíve been listening to the whole time.Ē That makes them tingle in the middle, and thatís why Iím taking their women.
DX: Since you brought up the ladies, I noticed your album is divided into sections. Then you have a group of six songs labeled ďThe Sextion.Ē
TN: Ah, man I got to have it. Iím a Scorpio male and ďThe SextionĒ had to happen. I was supposed to do it for [Misery Loves Kompany], and I let them get a piece of that with ďSex Out South,Ē ďThat BoxĒ and ďGet Ya Head Right.Ē But, I really hit them hard with this section on ďSeven Words.Ē
DX: Thatís actually the first song I listened to, because I thought you were doing something like George Carlin. Then the hook comes in and you sayÖ
TN: "I love it when you suck my dick!" Yeah, everyone falls out when they hear that because they ainít expecting the seven words to be that vulgar. Itís the perfect seven words because it works for males and females. Cats love it because itís funny as hell and they know that the bitches love it, so theyíre going to try and act that out. Thatís why I tried to teach the world about hot water, because a young lady in Minneapolis, Minnesota taught me about hot water. I had to reenact that so I could teach the world to sing those seven words. Itís the funniest situation, but itís also the realest situation. Why not share pleasure with the rest of the world? Thatís why ďThe SextionĒ is dominant.
DX: You say you never make a song just to make it. So did ďPsycho Bitch IIĒ come from fan demands or more crazy experiences?
TN: In dealing with women, if indeed you say youíre girl crazy, youíre gonna keep encountering psycho bitches. With more success and more fansónewer fans came because the Alpha Dog movie, [had] ďCaribou Lou,Ē and Iím A Player. Those people didnít catch the first ďPsycho Bitch.Ē You know how they remade Texas Chainsaw Massacre for the new generation? I felt like, ďYes, Iím still living it.Ē Iím just teaching these young motherfuckers some new shit, but itís on some old shit. ďPsycho BitchĒ came out in 2001, and now that í08 is here there are new lessons. They wonít ever learn because psycho bitches will always be here. When you play the game of hearts you end up with crimes of passionóbitches tapping your phone, looking through your wallet and wondering why there are condoms in your dresser when yíall donít use them.
DX: Although itís divided into sections, this Killer album seems like the best balance of all the different sides of your personality.
TN: Yeah, Iíve got control of it. Iím the king, the clown and the G. I let the clown get out of hand with the Ecstasy and the women, and thatís how I lost my wife. She knows Iím girl crazy. The stripper bitch that I had an affair with told my wife and taped me talking about an abortion with the bitch. I was gone on that shit, man. I was getting caught up with bitches and shit. Thatís all that the clown side had to offer me, and Iím not saying itís still not a part of me. Iím still girl crazy, but I cut that drug out. I donít want my kids to have to lose me to something ignorant

Fatal Guillotine
08-04-2008, 07:53 PM
[quote]DX: It sounds like itís been a long grind.
TN: Weíre an underground movement, but itís starting to make its way to the surface. Iíve been in this since í85 manósince the Jordan shoe. I wrote my first rhyme in seventh grade back in 1985. Iíve been doing this professionally since 1990, and Iíve been elite since I started. Thatís why you see me on a video with Eminem, or on a song with 2Pac, or on stage with Snoop Dogg. Iíve rocked with George Clinton, Slipknot and the list goes on and on. Tech N9ne is everything and Iím a fan of it. I feel like Iím trapped in a psychoís body. Iím trapped inside this motherfucker that writes this elite shit, and heís just taking me places. He took me to Denmark to do Roskilde Festival last year. I was in Australia with Kurupt, Dru Down, The Luniz and everybody. I was in Alaska last year. This is what this guy Tech N9ne is doing for me. Iím just like this little kid inside this cat that writes this elite shit.
My goal is to give this music to the rest of the world and let them hear non-fabricated Tech N9ne. We donít slouch, and weíre en vogueóin style all day. Sometimes we might be a little bit ahead of our time, but weíre right here in the middle of the map. Kansas City, MissouriÖmisery. We get our music from everywhere. We get it from the south, the east, the west and everywhere else. Once you get all this music from all these places pumped into one person, you get something astronomical. You can hear the influence of rock, opera, gang-banging, spoken word and everything else.
DX: With you being trapped inside your Tech N9ne persona, could you ever see yourself not doing something artistic for a living?
TN: No, I was born to do this. Iíve had jobs in my past. If I had to work for somebody and not have my own business like Strange Music, Iíd probably be dead or in jail. I hate to be that negative though. I have a keep on keeping on, warrior state of mind. If something negative is going to consume me, Iím going to lash out. This music thing is a positive thing for me. I was put here to do this. My mom, uncles and aunties instilled this rhythm in me. With rhythm came rhyme. Who wouldíve thought it would be me to make people say, ďI ainít never heard anything like you, man. I think youíre one of the best rappers.Ē
Iím just this little normal cat whoís abnormal at the same time. Thatís probably what makes me crazy, because I think Iím normal and I canít go to the movies with a bitch without getting swarmed. Thatís why my bodyguards are always trippiní with me like, ďNigga you canít go out there like that!Ē Iím thinking, ďYes I can. Yíall big ass niggas draw too much attention and Iím a little dude.Ē
People hear that abnormal shit in my music. If I had to be a normal dude and do a nine-to-five at the post office, Iíd go crazy. I have to be able to lash out spiritually. What would I do if I was at work all day flipping burgers, and I hear Kanye [West], Eminem, 50 Cent [click to read] and all these motherfuckers on the radio? I would go crazy if I knew that I had that in me and I couldnít get it to anybody. Tech N9ne is getting it to people, but he ainít getting it to enough motherfuckers. If Lil Wayne [click to read] can do a million in the first week Iíve got to do something. I know these motherfuckers love me. Some of them just donít know it yet.
DX: Throw on your A&R hat for a minute. Now that the recording industry is so different, it helps an independent artist like you. How do you make that work in your favor?
TN: Man, you name it: iTunes, ringtones and everything else. We donít have a lot of overhead, so all that coming in is ours. We donít have to pay a middleman anymore like a [Priority Records Co-Founder] Mark Cerami or Jay Ferris. We donít have a problem with Quincy because Quincy is still our people. We donít have a problem with Jimmy Jam and Terry Lewis. When I see them in the airport and stuff I give them love. They know it wasnít our fault; it was the bitches they had running their labels.
At Strange Music we are the label. Our distribution is with Universal through Fontana, and theyíre a good partner. We get our shit monthly and itís wonderful. While everybody is on the decline, weíre on the incline as an independent. Weíre not putting $500,000 towards a damn single. We ainít paying all that payola. Most of these motherfuckers can go gold, even triple-platinum, and wonít even see a damn royalty check. Thatís not happening here. My mechanical [royalties] are coming in from Everready as we speak. Iím vice president of my label, and Iím the first artist on Strange Musicóthe floor plan, if you will. Look what itís turning into

DX: With that in mind, you guys have been doing stuff that people are just catching on to. You met Ronnz over the Internet and he ended up doing a few songs for Absolute Power.
TN: Oh, youíre talking about Ronnz from Berlin? Yeah, all day. I work with producers from everywhere. If theyíve got the heat, it doesnít matter if theyíre high or low on the totem pole. Thatís how we found David Sanders II, Matic Lee and Ronnz. These cats actually sent beats in. I donít care if you live in the basement at your grandmaís house, if youíve got that heat, itís going on my album. And then it spreads.
People in Berlin have been waiting because that word spread that Tech N9ne fucks with them. I like my music to travel. Thatís why on ďEverybody MoveĒ I say, ďIím naughty, naughty, naughty boy, boy boy/when Iím in the Aussie, Aussie, Aussie (what)/Oy! Oy! Oy!Ē When I was over there, thatís what they were screaming. Now that was against us. Thatís pretty much saying, ďIíll fuck you up if youíre over here tripping, you American.Ē When I say that now they know whatís up. When I go to Australia theyíre gonna yell it to me, but itís going to be love this time.
DX: I want to switch gears real quick. As Hip Hop fans weíre exposed to a lot of Five Percent teachings from Rakim on down to Brand Nubian and Wu-Tang Clan. ďCanít Shake ItĒ is one of the few songs that openly questions that.
TN: Man, thatís reality. Thatís what I mean by being inside-out. People wouldnít dare speak against The Honorable Elijah Muhammad or Noble Drew Ali. Iíll tell you something though. With this religion stuff itís all man made, brother. What other reason would explain the death of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.? He found the God plan. That means everybody is created equal. You know that speech about Jews and gentiles.
Same thing with Malcolm X when he took his pilgrimage to Mecca. He saw that everything he was saying about racial separation was wrong and it was made by man. When he was in Mecca and drinking out of the same cups as Muslims of different races, he had to come back to the states and say, ďI was wrong.Ē That was going to fuck up Elijah Muhammadís money, and their solution was saying, ďWeíre gonna kill this nigga and silence him.Ē
Thatís nigga shit, man! Thatís not spiritual and itís not godlike. If God exists thatís not it. Everybody with the God plan seems to die in this world. What does that tell me? This world is run by evil deeds. Look at Bush. I hate to speak about it because I can speak about it forever. Thatís why [on ďCanít Shake ItĒ] I said, ďI was brought up in a Christian house/but my mama married a Muslim/threw the Christian out/what they did to Malcolm X threw the Islam out/so my homies with money seem to be the glistening route.Ē Thatís where the bloodshed came in, and I say what I feel. I read Message to the Black Man when I was younger, but then you read the story of Malcolm X and find out it was his own people that did that in front of his kids and everything. Then Spike Lee put it in a film, and itís like, ďAh, man.Ē Here was somebody that understood the remedy for man was togetherness instead of separation, and theyíre not here anymore. Man canít speak to me, and thatís why I love women. Donít get me wrong because bitches can make you do some shit like that too. Look at the Adam and Eve storyótheyíre tantalizing and they make you do shit youíre not supposed to do. Theyíre the gateway to evil, but theyíre beautiful. Theyíre angels; man is self-destructive. Everything man has created he has also single-handedly destroyed.
Thatís why on ďHope For A Higher PowerĒ I said, ďWhat A gamble/thatís what life is and itís hard to handle/the Bible says worship this/but the scriptureís written by man though/so when man destroys us/the word might not stand so/ítill that day Iím just gone protect my fam with ammo.Ē The higher power may be firepower, and if thatís the case, weíre gonna lose. Thatís a dark thought, man. Who has the most firepower? The government. Niggas in the hood can shoot and kill each other all we want to, but if it ever came down to marshal law and anarchy erupts, we ainít winning against those tanks. So, what do we do? We do the best we can to protect our loved ones until we canít anymore. We party like itís 1999, even though it didnít end in í99 like Prince thought. We party like thereís no tomorrow. [Laughs]
DX: So weíve got the conspiracy theory and you dabble in the numerology as far as your name goesÖ
TN: Yeah, man Iíve got to. Nine is a number of completion. It takes nine months to complete a pregnancy. A cat has nine lives. Thereís nothing else like nine, because itís the highest single digit. After that itís double, triple and quadruple. The technique is complete and I have the complete technique of rhyming. Iím everything in one
DX: Where did you pick that up?
TN: I donít recall. When I got my name in í88, it was because I spit fast like a semi-automatic tech nine, and I was in a group called Black Mafia. I read a lot when I was younger. As far as when and how I ran across numerology back then, I could not tell you. But, Iím so glad it happened because it put me in a spiritual place. With my name being Aaron, off top, thatís Mosesí brother the high priest. So I got that and the number nine to symbolize completion, and it made me feel like Iím supposed to be here doing this.
Now if I feel like king of all kings, imagine how it feels when the whole world isnít getting it. Iím watching 50 Cent on MTV Jams right now with the mute button onóheís in Africa. I love it. G-Unit is in Africa enjoying life, doing music and learning new shit. When I was on tour with Paul Wall, he had just come back from Sierra Leone with Raekwon doing [Bligíd]. Thatís what itís all about with this music thing. Weíre from the hood. Who the fuck chose us to do this?
Itís got to be a spiritual thing, man. I pray every night, and I want to believe that. If this is just something like how they say The Bible is just a parable and it contradicts itself, and man contradicts himselfÖif there is not anything higher than us, then itís going to be a problem. What happens when people start knowing that? Weíve been knowing it for a long time. This is divine that we can stick our genitals inside of a woman, bust, and then another human being that looks like you comes out. Creation versus Darwinism? This shit grew like a plant. Creation tells you that God created everything, and yet Darwinism sounds more logical. Niggas donít know what to think, but we pray daily. We need all the good luck in the world, because weíve had dark days so many times in our lives. Iíve got too much to say to the world, man.
DX: I see. Itís pretty obvious that youíre well-read. Is there any particular book that stands out?
TN: A lot of my reading went on in the past. After this Tech N9ne thing sped up, I had no time. I havenít rebooted in years. Everything that Iím speaking right now is over the years from reading about the Illuminati, Message to the Black Man, The Celestine ProphecyÖit keeps going. This is shit I picked up years and years ago, and it broadened my way of thinking. I had all these different religious beliefs and I was kind of screwed up. My mom was a hardcore Christian and my step-dad, who was a Muslim, married her when I was 12. That made me question Buddhism, Judaism, Hinduism, Taoism and Shinto. It made me think that there were all these different places and languages. Itís like how the Christians thought Allah was a different man, but it was just a different language for God. Itís just a misunderstanding. People are different, but we all have something in common. Weíre human beings.

Fatal Guillotine
08-04-2008, 07:56 PM
DX: Where did you pick that up?
TN: I don’t recall. When I got my name in ’88, it was because I spit fast like a semi-automatic tech nine, and I was in a group called Black Mafia. I read a lot when I was younger. As far as when and how I ran across numerology back then, I could not tell you. But, I’m so glad it happened because it put me in a spiritual place. With my name being Aaron, off top, that’s Moses’ brother the high priest. So I got that and the number nine to symbolize completion, and it made me feel like I’m supposed to be here doing this.
Now if I feel like king of all kings, imagine how it feels when the whole world isn’t getting it. I’m watching 50 Cent on MTV Jams right now with the mute button on—he’s in Africa. I love it. G-Unit is in Africa enjoying life, doing music and learning new shit. When I was on tour with Paul Wall, he had just come back from Sierra Leone with Raekwon doing [Blig’d]. That’s what it’s all about with this music thing. We’re from the hood. Who the fuck chose us to do this?
It’s got to be a spiritual thing, man. I pray every night, and I want to believe that. If this is just something like how they say The Bible is just a parable and it contradicts itself, and man contradicts himself…if there is not anything higher than us, then it’s going to be a problem. What happens when people start knowing that? We’ve been knowing it for a long time. This is divine that we can stick our genitals inside of a woman, bust, and then another human being that looks like you comes out. Creation versus Darwinism? This shit grew like a plant. Creation tells you that God created everything, and yet Darwinism sounds more logical. Niggas don’t know what to think, but we pray daily. We need all the good luck in the world, because we’ve had dark days so many times in our lives. I’ve got too much to say to the world, man.
DX: I see. It’s pretty obvious that you’re well-read. Is there any particular book that stands out?
TN: A lot of my reading went on in the past. After this Tech N9ne thing sped up, I had no time. I haven’t rebooted in years. Everything that I’m speaking right now is over the years from reading about the Illuminati, Message to the Black Man, The Celestine Prophecy…it keeps going. This is shit I picked up years and years ago, and it broadened my way of thinking. I had all these different religious beliefs and I was kind of screwed up. My mom was a hardcore Christian and my step-dad, who was a Muslim, married her when I was 12. That made me question Buddhism, Judaism, Hinduism, Taoism and Shinto. It made me think that there were all these different places and languages. It’s like how the Christians thought Allah was a different man, but it was just a different language for God. It’s just a misunderstanding. People are different, but we all have something in common. We’re human beings.
I have never seen something supernatural. When they say some place is haunted I go stand right there. We’ll be on tour, and someone will say one of the basements in those old venues is haunted. It’s one of those things like a little girl died there, and you can still hear her playing with her ball or some shit. I’ll go in the basement and stand in the corner for like a minute and see if I feel anything different. It never happens. It’s kind of eerie, and you never know if there’s a psycho down there who just wants to fulfill everybody’s dream and kill you. But, I’ve never seen anything supernatural.
Can you imagine how drastically my music would change if I saw something higher than a human being? When you hear people like Floetry sing, that’s divine. Talent is divine to me. Nobody can sing like Marsha Ambrosius. The way Jimi Hendrix played was divine. The nigga played with his teeth! But, I’ve never seen anything higher than a human being. I’ve seen towering human beings, like Shaq, but I’ve never seen anything spiritual. That would be validation. I’d think, “Okay, I really need to get my shit right.” But what’s really right—the stuff that’s in The Bible or The Koran? Then you go crazy. You’re so smart, yet you go crazy.
DX: That’s ill. I’ve never heard you mention The Celestine Prophecy in any interview or song, but I just had this feeling you were gonna say something about that book and energy.
TN: Yeah, man. You can feel my energy through the phone. I’m calm. This is my life. It’s not a thing, but it’s some thing for me to be that way and it exudes happiness. Sometimes it exudes confusion or madness, but right now I’m in a quiet place. My children are out of school, they’re kicking it and they don’t want for anything. I’m taking my son to the movies after awhile. You can feel that energy and it’s me all the time.
DX: Do your kids know what you do for a living? And if they do, what do they think of your music?
TN: My kids are the biggest Tech N9ne fans ever, man. I let them listen to whatever they want to, and they’re really eclectic. I’ve got two 13-year-olds and one nine-year-old. They listen to me, and they’re so proud of me. My two little girls live in Los Angeles and my son lives here in Kansas City with his mom. They love me and my music. They have been on stage with me since they were born, introducing me on the mic at the age of three. There’s no shyness or nothing. They are my reason for growing up and they’re the reason I stopped doing Ecstasy, acid, ‘shrooms, GHB and all that shit. I can’t be killing my body because I need to be there for them. I still drink, but I stopped smoking weed in ’98. I’m working to take them to Hawaii in mid-July. They call me everyday asking, “Daddy, are we still going to Hawaii.” I have to keep telling them, “Yes, I just have to find the correct time.” They are why I do this.

Fatal Guillotine
08-04-2008, 07:57 PM
My children are in awe when it comes to my music. Me and my wife were just talking about my nine-year-old.
ďDo you know Rainbowís favorite song on Krizz Kalikoís album?Ē
ďĎIt Ainít Your Bitch,í right?Ē
ďYeah, how did you know that?Ē
ďI donít know. I just know my little one.Ē
She would come home and play that ten times in a row after she came home from school. Itís the one where Iím singing on the chorus, ďIt was cool when I met her/the type of chick who wanna do whatever/I think you better let her/cause nigga that ainít your bitch.Ē What is my nine-year-old little girl thinking listening to that? What, she gets kick out of that? But, sheís smart as hell. That tells me she loves music that relaxes her. So yeah, my kids have been on it.