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Fatal Guillotine
08-10-2008, 02:46 PM
Peace and blessing to all i wanted to share my knowledge of meditation and its involvement of other faiths i have been practicing meditation of and on for about 2 1/2 years.



Meditation is a discipline by which one attempts to get beyond the conditioned, "thinking" mind into a deeper state of relaxation or awareness. It often involves turning attention to a single point of reference. Meditation is recognized as a component of almost all religions, and has been practiced for over 5,000 years. It is also practiced outside religious traditions. Different meditative disciplines encompass a wide range of spiritual and/or psychophysical practices which may emphasize different goals -- from achievement of a higher state of consciousness, to greater focus, creativity or self-awareness, or simply a more relaxed and peaceful frame of mind.

The word meditation originally comes from the Indo-European root med-, meaning "to measure." From the root med- are also derived the English words mete, medicine, modest, and moderate. It entered English as meditation through the Latin meditatio, which originally indicated every type of physical or intellectual exercise, then later evolved into the more specific meaning "contemplation."

Eastern meditation techniques have been adapted and increasingly practiced in Western culture.

Forms of meditation

Meditation has been defined as: "self regulation of attention, in the service of self-inquiry, in the here and now." The various techniques of meditation can be classified according to their focus. Some focus on the field or background perception and experience, also called "mindfulness"; others focus on a preselected specific object, and are called "concentrative" meditation. There are also techniques that shift between the field and the object.

In mindfulness meditation, the meditator sits comfortably and silently, centering attention by focusing awareness on an object or process (either the breath, a sound: a mantra, koan or riddle evoking questions; a visualisation, or an exercise). The meditator is usually encouraged to maintain an open focus:

... shifting freely from one perception to the next clear your mind of all that bothers you no thoughts that can distract you from reality or your personal being... No thought, image or sensation is considered an intrusion. The meditator, with a 'no effort' attitude, is asked to remain in the here and now. Using the focus as an 'anchor'... brings the subject constantly back to the present, avoiding cognitive analysis or fantasy regarding the contents of awareness, and increasing tolerance and relaxation of secondary thought processes.

Concentration meditation is used in many religions and spiritual practices. Whereas in mindfulness meditation there is an open focus, in concentration meditation the meditator holds attention on a particular object (e.g., a repetitive prayer) while minimizing distractions; bringing the mind back to concentrate on the chosen object. In some traditions, such as Vipassana, mindfulness and concentration are combined.

Meditation can be practiced while walking or doing simple repetitive tasks. Walking meditation helps to break down habitual automatic mental categories, "thus regaining the primary nature of perceptions and events, focusing attention on the process while disregarding its purpose or final outcome." In a form of meditation using visualization, such as Chinese Qi Gong, the practitioner concentrates on flows of energy (Qi) in the body, starting in the abdomen and then circulating through the body, until dispersed. Some meditative traditions, such as yoga or tantra, are common to several religions or occur outside religious contexts.

Hinduism

Meditation originated from Vedic Hinduism which is the oldest religion that professes meditation as a spiritual and religious practice.

Evidence of the origins of meditation extends back to a time before recorded history. Archaeologists tell us the practice may have existed among the first Indian civilizations. Indian scriptures dating back 5000 years describe meditation techniques. From its ancient beginnings and over thousands of years, meditation has developed into a structured practice used today by millions of people worldwide of differing nationalities and religious beliefs

Yoga is one of the six schools of Hindu philosophy, focusing on meditation. In India, Yoga is seen as a means to both physiological and spiritual mastery.

There are several types of meditation in Hinduism. Amongst these types are:

Vedanta, a form of Jnana Yoga.
Raja Yoga as outlined by Patanjali, which describes eight "limbs" of spiritual practices, half of which might be classified as meditation. Underlying them is the assumption that a yogi should still the fluctuations of his or her mind: Yoga cittavrrti nirodha.
Surat shabd yoga, or "sound and light meditation"
Japa Yoga, in which a mantra is repeated aloud or silently
Bhakti Yoga, the yoga of love and devotion, in which the seeker is focused on an object of devotion, eg Krishna
Hatha Yoga, in which postures and meditations are aimed at raising the spiritual energy, known as Kundalini, which rises through energy centres known as chakras
The objective of meditation is to reach a calm state of mind. Patanjali, in his Yoga Sutras, described five different states of mind: Ksipta, Mudha, Viksipta, Ekagra and Nirodha.

Ksipta defines a very agitated mind, unable to think, listen or remain quiet. It is jumping from one thought to another.
In Mudha no information seems to reach the brain; the person is absentminded.
Viksipta is a higher state where the mind receives information but is not able to process it. It moves from one thought to another, in a confused inner speech.
Ekagra is the state of a calm mind but not asleep. The person is focused and can pay attention.
Lastly Nirodha, when the mind is not disturbed by erratic thoughts, it is completely focused, as when you are meditating or totally centered in what you are doing.
The ultimate end of meditation according to Patanjali is the destruction of primal ignorance (avidya) and the realization of and establishment in the essential nature of the Self.

Swami Vivekananda describes meditation as follows:

"Meditation has been laid stress upon by all religions. The meditative state of mind is declared by the Yogis to be the highest state in which the mind exists. When the mind is studying the external object, it gets identified with it, loses itself. To use the simile of the old Indian philosopher: the soul of man is like a piece of crystal, but it takes the colour of whatever is near it. Whatever the soul touches ... it has to take its colour. That is the difficulty. That constitutes the bondage. The colour is so strong, the crystal forgets itself and identifies itself with the colour. Suppose a red flower is near the crystal and the crystal takes the colour and forgets itself, thinks it is red. We have taken the colour of the body and have forgotten what we are. All the difficulties that follow come from that one dead body. All our fears, all worries, anxieties, troubles, mistakes, weakness, evil, are from that one great blunder — that we are bodies. This is the ordinary person. It is the person taking the colour of the flower near to it. We are no more bodies than the crystal is the red flower.

The practice of meditation is pursued. The crystal knows what it is, takes its own colour. It is meditation that brings us nearer to truth than anything else. ..."

The Bhagavad Gita stresses the importance of meditation. The Sixth Chapter of Bhagavad Gita - "The Yoga of Meditation" describes the technique of meditation, and the characteristics of the Yogi who is well established in meditation. The Bhagavad Gita stresses the importance of meditation as follows "Make a habit of practising meditation and do not let your mind be distracted. In this way you will come finally to the Lord who is the light-giver, the highest of the high."


Buddhism

Meditation has always been central to Buddhism. The historical Buddha himself was said to have achieved enlightenment while meditating under a Bodhi tree. Most forms of Buddhism distinguish between two classes of meditation practices, shamatha and vipassana, both of which are necessary for attaining enlightenment. The former consists of practices aimed at developing the ability to focus the attention single-pointedly; the latter includes practices aimed at developing insight and wisdom through seeing the true nature of reality. The differentiation between the two types of meditation practices is not always clear cut, which is made obvious when studying practices such as Anapanasati which could be said to start off as a shamatha practice but that goes through a number of stages and ends up as a vipassana practice.

Theravada Buddhism emphasizes the meditative development of mindfulness (sati, see for example the Satipatthana Sutta) and concentration (samadhi, see kammatthana), as part of the Noble Eightfold Path, in the pursuit of Nibbana (Nirvana). Traditional popular meditation subjects include the breath (anapana) and loving-kindness (mettā).


Japanese Zen master Kodo Sawaki (1880-1965) in full lotus posture.In Japanese Mahayana schools, Tendai (Tien-tai), concentration is cultivated through highly structured ritual. Especially in the Chinese Chán Buddhism school (which branched out into the Japanese Zen, and Korean Seon schools), ts'o ch'an meditation and koan meditation practices allow a practitioner to directly experience the true nature of reality (each of the names of these schools derives from the Sanskrit dhyana, and translates into "meditation" in their respective languages). The esoteric Shingon sect shares many features with Tibetan Buddhism.

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana) emphasizes tantra for its senior practitioners; hence its alternate name of Tantrayana Buddhism. Many monks go through their day without "meditating" in a recognizable form, but are more likely to chant or participate in group liturgy. In this tradition, the purpose of meditation is to awaken the sky-like nature of mind, and to introduce practitioners to that which they really are: unchanging pure awareness, which underlies the whole of life and death.

Meditation is the way to bring us back to ourselves, where we can really experience and taste our full being, beyond all habitual patterns. In the stillness and silence of meditation, we glimpse and return to that deep inner nature that we have so long ago lost sight of amid the business and distraction of our minds.

Most Buddhist traditions recognize that the path to Enlightenment entails three types of training: virtue (sīla); meditation (citta); and, wisdom (paññā).[17] Thus, meditative prowess alone is not sufficient; it is but one part of the path. In other words, in Buddhism, in tandem with mental cultivation, ethical development and wise understanding are also necessary for the attainment of the highest goal

Christianity

Christian traditions have various practices which can be identified as forms of "meditation." Monastic traditions are the basis for many of these practices. Practices such as the rosary, the Adoration (focusing on the eucharist) in Catholicism or the hesychast tradition in Eastern Orthodoxy, may be compared to forms of Eastern meditation that focus on an individual object. Christian meditation is considered a form of prayer. Hesychastic practice, may involve recitation of the Jesus Prayer, thus "through the grace of God and one's own effort, to concentrate the nous in the heart." Prayer as a form of meditation of the heart is described in the Philokalia—a practice that leads towards Theosis which ignores the senses and results in inner stillness.

In 1975, the Benedictine monk, John Main introduced a form of meditation based on repetitive recitation of a prayer-phrase, traditionally the Aramaic phrase "Maranatha," meaning "Come, Oh Lord", as quoted at the end of both Corinthians and Revelation. The World Community for Christian Meditation was founded in 1991 to continue Main's work, which the Community describes as: "teaching Christian meditation as part of the great work of our time of restoring the contemplative dimension of Christian faith in the life of the church."

The Old Testament book of Joshua sets out a form of meditation based on scriptures: "Do not let this Book of the Law depart from your mouth; meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do everything written in it, then you will be prosperous and successful" (Joshua 1:8). This is one of the reasons why bible verse memory is a practice among many evangelical Christians


Islam

Meditation in Islam is the core of its creed and way of life. In the five times a day (before dawn, noon, afternoon, sunset, and night) that a Muslim is obligated to pray, focusing and meditating on Allah through reciting Quran and dhikr is the core of this practice aimed at establishing the connection between Creator and creation, which in turn guides the soul to truth. Through these five times a day of meditating a Muslim is expected to maintain the spiritual peace he/she experiences through work, social and family life and every single aspect his awakeness, transforming his whole day to meditation, so that when he/she goes to sleep its nothing but another phase of meditation till the next morning (3 Al Emran verses 189-194) (6 Al Anaam verses 160 to 163).

Meditative quiescence is believed to have a quality of healing and creativity. The Muslim prophet Muhammad, whose deeds devout Muslims follow, spent long periods in meditation and contemplation. It was during one such period of meditation that Muhammad began to receive revelations of the Qur'an.

Two more concepts or schools of meditation in Islam:

Tafakkur and Tadabbur, literally meaning reflection upon the universe. Muslims feel this is a form of intellectual development which emanates from a higher level, i.e. from God. This intellectual process through the receiving of divine inspiration awakens and liberates the human mind, permitting man’s inner personality to develop and grow so that he may lead his life on a spiritual plane far above the mundane level. This is consistent with the global teachings of Islam, which views life as a test of our practice of submission to Allah, the one God.
The second form of meditation is the Sufi meditation, it is largely based on mystical exercises. However, this method is controversial among Muslim scholars. One group of Ulama, Al-Ghazzali, for instance, have accepted it, another group of Ulama, Ibn Taymiya, for instance, have rejected it as a bid'ah

Judaism
There is evidence that Judaism has had meditative practices that go back thousands of years. For instance, in the Torah, the patriarch Isaac is described as going (lasuach) in the field—a term understood by all commentators as some type of meditative practice (Genesis 24:63), probably prayer.

Similarly, there are indications throughout the Tanach (the Hebrew Bible) that meditation was central to the prophets. In the Old Testament, there are two Hebrew words for meditation: hāgâ , which means to sigh or murmur, but also to meditate, and sîâ , which means to muse, or rehearse in one's mind.

In modern Jewish practice, one of the best known meditative practices is called hitbodedut ( or hisbodedus is explained in Kabbalah and Hassidic philosophy. The word hisbodedut, which derives from the Hebrew word "boded", (a state of being alone) and said to be related to the sfirah of Binah (lit. book of understanding), means the process of making oneself understand a concept well through analytical study.

Kabbalah is inherently a meditative field of study. Kabbalistic meditative practices construct a supernal realm which the soul navigates through in order to achieve certain ends. One of the most well known types of meditation is Merkabah, from the root /R-K-B/ meaning "chariot"(of God).


Taoism

Taoism includes a number of meditative and contemplative traditions. Originally said to have their principles described in the I Ching, Tao Te Ching, Chuang Tzu and Tao Tsang among other texts; the multitude of schools relating to Qigong, Neigong, Daoyin and Zhan zhuang are a large, diverse array of breath training practises in aid of meditation with much influence from later Chinese Buddhism and with much influence on traditional Chinese medicine and the Chinese as well as some Japanese martial arts. The Chinese martial art T'ai Chi Ch'uan is named after the well-known focus for Taoist and Neo-Confucian meditation, the T'ai Chi T'u, and is often referred to as “meditation in motion”.

Often Taoist Internal martial arts, especially Tai Chi Chuan are thought of as moving meditation. A common phrase being, "movement in stillness" referring to energetic movement in passive Qigong and seated Taoist meditation; with the converse being "stillness in movement", a state of mental calm and meditation in the tai chi form.

Physical postures[/quotes]

[quote]Spine

Many meditative traditions teach that the spine should be kept "straight" (i.e. that the meditator should not slouch). Often this is explained as a way of encouraging the circulation of what some call "spiritual energy," the "vital breath", the "life force" (Sanskrit prana, Chinese qi, Latin spiritus) or the Kundalini. In some traditions the meditator may sit on a chair, flat-footed (as in New Thought); sit on a stool (as in Orthodox Christianity); or walk in mindfulness (as in Theravada Buddhism). Some traditions suggest being barefoot, for comfort, for convenience, or for spiritual reasons.

Other traditions, such as those related to kundalini yoga, take a less formal approach. While the basic practice in these traditions is also to sit still quietly in a traditional posture, they emphasize the possibility of kriyas - spontaneous yogic postures, changes in breathing patterns or emotional states, or perhaps repetitive physical movements such as swaying, etc., which may naturally arise as the practitioner sits in meditation, and which should not be resisted but rather allowed to express themselves in order to enhance the natural flow of energy through the body. This is said to help purify the nadis and ultimately deepen one's meditative practice

Mudra/Hand

Various hand-gestures or mudras may be prescribed. These can carry theological meaning or according to Yogic philosophy can actually affect consciousness. For example, a common Buddhist hand-position is with the right hand resting atop the left (like the Buddha's begging bowl), with the thumbs touching.


Eyes

In most meditative traditions, the eyes are closed. In some sects such as Zen, the eyes are half-closed, half open and looking slightly downward. In others such as Brahma Kumaris, the eyes are kept fully open.

Quiet is often held to be desirable, and some people use repetitive activities such as deep breathing, humming or chanting to help induce a meditative state.

In Sufism meditation (muraqaba) with eyes closed is called Varood while with open eyes is known as Shahood or Fa'tha.


Focus and Gaze
Often such details are shared by more than one religion, even in cases where mutual influence seems unlikely. One example would be "navel-gazing," which is apparently attested within Eastern Orthodoxy as well as Chinese qigong practice. Another would be the practice of focusing on the breath, which is found in Orthodox Christianity, Sufism, and numerous Indic traditions.


Cross-legged Sitting
Sitting cross-legged (or upon one's knees) for extended periods when one is not sufficiently limber, can result in a range of ergonomic complaints called "meditator's knee". Many meditative traditions do not require sitting cross legged.


Youtube Vids
How to Meditate

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Books
Meditation For Dummies
http://www.textbooksrus.com/book_pics_large/0471777749.jpg

The Tao of Meditation: Way to Enlightenment
http://www.ninja-weapons.com/Books/Self%20Discovery/images/ISBN0804814.jpg

365 Tao: Daily Meditations
http://cdn.harpercollins.com/harperimages/isbn/large/0/9780062502230.jpg

TSA
08-10-2008, 08:40 PM
are the effects of meditation enhanced when done in the ghetto?

The Void
08-11-2008, 12:03 AM
Cappadonna knows that answer TSA.

TSA
08-11-2008, 12:03 PM
cappadonna knows the answer to all..

but dope ass thread

Fatal Guillotine
08-11-2008, 03:01 PM
The person doing meditation for the first time should not meditate for more than 10-15 minutes. After doing regularly, one can do it for longer time. Most of the people do meditation for about 20-30 minutes twice daily but the duration of meditation depends on the person.

as far as my personal experiences with meditation their is sort of a lower pulse rate, reduced blood pressure and decreased metabolic rate. Doing meditation at this time helps one to gain energy and peace. Most of the people do meditation before dinner or later in the evening and even at noon. Meditation at this time enables a person to relieve from the build up stress. i sometimes find that whenever i have a headache and i sitting fo about 20-25 minutes meditating my headache is gone.

LORD NOSE
08-11-2008, 03:05 PM
as far as my personal experiences with meditation their is sort of a lower pulse rate, reduced blood pressure and decreased metabolic rate. Doing meditation at this time helps one to gain energy and peace.

what you say is fact - when you get your blood pressure checked, the doctor asks you if you are an athlete

Fatal Guillotine
08-11-2008, 03:10 PM
what you say is fact - when you get your blood pressure checked, the doctor asks you if you are an athlete

right exactly sunny

TSA
08-11-2008, 06:33 PM
if that shit reduces blood pressure im all for it, i have horrible nigerian blood pressure(high as hell to fight malaria).

well idk if i have it, but everyone in my family except my grandpa and sister do, so yeah, i'll read later

Fatal Guillotine
08-11-2008, 07:22 PM
if that shit reduces blood pressure im all for it, i have horrible nigerian blood pressure(high as hell to fight malaria).

well idk if i have it, but everyone in my family except my grandpa and sister do, so yeah, i'll read later

i dont know about all that TSA, but i find it to be a huge stress reliever for me. i actually had an art teacher introduce me to meditation

diggy
08-11-2008, 07:45 PM
That thing about meditation and low blood pressure I find tru also. When ever I visit the doctor, my blood pressure is measured as low but not too low. I always get the question of whether I'm an athlete, but I'm not.

Also avoiding unneccesary fat and lab made foods helps. Lowering your salt and alcohol intake helps.

Fatal Guillotine
08-11-2008, 08:03 PM
thats a valid point you made diggy. avoiding such food that is high in trans fat or high in sodium(salt) in a way helps reduces blood pressure. meditation is great for many things this is how some taoist hone/sharpen their chi. Meditation is said to help everything from problems with high blood pressure to sex.

J.T.S.
08-12-2008, 08:49 AM
Meditation is said to help everything from problems with high blood pressure to sex.

I actually have high blood pressure, and meditating has fixed the problem.
even highblood pressure pills couldn't do that.
how does it relate to sex though?

Fatal Guillotine
08-12-2008, 10:12 AM
its suppose to help with erectile dysfunction. dont know if its true cause i dont have that problem

The Void
08-12-2008, 08:51 PM
^^ I'm sure that Tantra helps with that, energy flow to the lower chakras.

The Bhagavad Gita stresses the importance of meditation. The Sixth Chapter of Bhagavad Gita - "The Yoga of Meditation" describes the technique of meditation, and the characteristics of the Yogi who is well established in meditation. The Bhagavad Gita stresses the importance of meditation as follows "Make a habit of practising meditation and do not let your mind be distracted. In this way you will come finally to the Lord who is the light-giver, the highest of the high."


Krshna also said that Arjuna, who did not meditate or do Yoga, was one of the highest Yogis around. As there were different types of the form, his being non-action.
(from what I remember, I could be wrong)

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-12-2008, 11:36 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings...

how does it relate to sex though?

The meditation state is a state midway between the waking state (where the sub-conscious is in the background and will is in the foreground) and the sleep state (the will slumbers and the sub-conscious comes to the foreground). In this state the will and the sub-conscious unite which means it is possible to take control of functions normally under the control of the sub-conscious.

Masters of meditation have been known to be able to stop their heart beating, survive in freezing cold weather etc etc.

Also, meditation cultivates the Life Force (Ra) within. This is our portion of the creative power of the universe. It is the sexual power and diminishes everytime you spill your seed. Diminished sexual power leads to a decrease in vitality and in your libido, which can lead to erectile dysfunction.

SHEM HETEP

Fatal Guillotine
08-13-2008, 02:32 PM
The meditation state is a state midway between the waking state (where the sub-conscious is in the background and will is in the foreground) and the sleep state (the will slumbers and the sub-conscious comes to the foreground). In this state the will and the sub-conscious unite which means it is possible to take control of functions normally under the control of the sub-conscious.

Masters of meditation have been known to be able to stop their heart beating, survive in freezing cold weather etc etc.

Also, meditation cultivates the Life Force (Ra) within. This is our portion of the creative power of the universe. It is the sexual power and diminishes everytime you spill your seed. Diminished sexual power leads to a decrease in vitality and in your libido, which can lead to erectile dysfunction.


i see you have some insight on meditation as well. Respect. where are you getting your information because i never really heard of this

WARPATH
08-13-2008, 04:32 PM
Also, meditation cultivates the Life Force (Ra) within. This is our portion of the creative power of the universe. It is the sexual power and diminishes everytime you spill your seed. Diminished sexual power leads to a decrease in vitality and in your libido, which can lead to erectile dysfunction.

SHEM HETEP



The volume of your ejaculate can vary, depending on how well hydrated you are and how many times you've ejaculated within a short period of time. The average ejaculate measures around a half-teaspoon, though it may reach a little over a teaspoon. During a single sexual experience, the volume of ejaculate is greatest the first time you cum, and less for each subsequent load. "Remember the law of diminishing returns," says Franklin Lowe, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S., associate director of Urology at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York, NY.


Meditate on that for a while.

WARPATH
08-13-2008, 04:41 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings...

The meditation state is a state midway between the waking state (where the sub-conscious is in the background and will is in the foreground) and the sleep state (the will slumbers and the sub-conscious comes to the foreground). In this state the will and the sub-conscious unite which means it is possible to take control of functions normally under the control of the sub-conscious.

Masters of meditation have been known to be able to stop their heart beating, survive in freezing cold weather etc etc.



What would be the point of stopping your heart beat?

People smart enough to wear jackets in the winter have been known to survive in the freezing cold too......

I'm just saying if your gonna make claims like this back it up with a story or source. Give us somthing.

WARPATH
08-15-2008, 01:06 PM
When (indigenous peoples) meditate, there usually some other factors. Besides chanting and singing, they use extreme temperatures, fasting, rigorous dancing, and body piercing. Some things I can vouch for are astral projection, foresight, and a physical awareness of the super natural through the 5 senses.

SID
08-15-2008, 03:44 PM
Peace and blessing to all i wanted to share my knowledge of meditation and its involvement of other faiths i have been practicing meditation of and on for about 2 1/2 years.



Meditation is a discipline by which one attempts to get beyond the conditioned, "thinking" mind into a deeper state of relaxation or awareness. It often involves turning attention to a single point of reference. Meditation is recognized as a component of almost all religions, and has been practiced for over 5,000 years. It is also practiced outside religious traditions. Different meditative disciplines encompass a wide range of spiritual and/or psychophysical practices which may emphasize different goals -- from achievement of a higher state of consciousness, to greater focus, creativity or self-awareness, or simply a more relaxed and peaceful frame of mind.

The word meditation originally comes from the Indo-European root med-, meaning "to measure." From the root med- are also derived the English words mete, medicine, modest, and moderate. It entered English as meditation through the Latin meditatio, which originally indicated every type of physical or intellectual exercise, then later evolved into the more specific meaning "contemplation."

Eastern meditation techniques have been adapted and increasingly practiced in Western culture.



Meditation has been defined as: "self regulation of attention, in the service of self-inquiry, in the here and now." The various techniques of meditation can be classified according to their focus. Some focus on the field or background perception and experience, also called "mindfulness"; others focus on a preselected specific object, and are called "concentrative" meditation. There are also techniques that shift between the field and the object.

In mindfulness meditation, the meditator sits comfortably and silently, centering attention by focusing awareness on an object or process (either the breath, a sound: a mantra, koan or riddle evoking questions; a visualisation, or an exercise). The meditator is usually encouraged to maintain an open focus:

... shifting freely from one perception to the next clear your mind of all that bothers you no thoughts that can distract you from reality or your personal being... No thought, image or sensation is considered an intrusion. The meditator, with a 'no effort' attitude, is asked to remain in the here and now. Using the focus as an 'anchor'... brings the subject constantly back to the present, avoiding cognitive analysis or fantasy regarding the contents of awareness, and increasing tolerance and relaxation of secondary thought processes.

Concentration meditation is used in many religions and spiritual practices. Whereas in mindfulness meditation there is an open focus, in concentration meditation the meditator holds attention on a particular object (e.g., a repetitive prayer) while minimizing distractions; bringing the mind back to concentrate on the chosen object. In some traditions, such as Vipassana, mindfulness and concentration are combined.

Meditation can be practiced while walking or doing simple repetitive tasks. Walking meditation helps to break down habitual automatic mental categories, "thus regaining the primary nature of perceptions and events, focusing attention on the process while disregarding its purpose or final outcome." In a form of meditation using visualization, such as Chinese Qi Gong, the practitioner concentrates on flows of energy (Qi) in the body, starting in the abdomen and then circulating through the body, until dispersed. Some meditative traditions, such as yoga or tantra, are common to several religions or occur outside religious contexts.



Meditation originated from Vedic Hinduism which is the oldest religion that professes meditation as a spiritual and religious practice.

Evidence of the origins of meditation extends back to a time before recorded history. Archaeologists tell us the practice may have existed among the first Indian civilizations. Indian scriptures dating back 5000 years describe meditation techniques. From its ancient beginnings and over thousands of years, meditation has developed into a structured practice used today by millions of people worldwide of differing nationalities and religious beliefs

Yoga is one of the six schools of Hindu philosophy, focusing on meditation. In India, Yoga is seen as a means to both physiological and spiritual mastery.

There are several types of meditation in Hinduism. Amongst these types are:

Vedanta, a form of Jnana Yoga.
Raja Yoga as outlined by Patanjali, which describes eight "limbs" of spiritual practices, half of which might be classified as meditation. Underlying them is the assumption that a yogi should still the fluctuations of his or her mind: Yoga cittavrrti nirodha.
Surat shabd yoga, or "sound and light meditation"
Japa Yoga, in which a mantra is repeated aloud or silently
Bhakti Yoga, the yoga of love and devotion, in which the seeker is focused on an object of devotion, eg Krishna
Hatha Yoga, in which postures and meditations are aimed at raising the spiritual energy, known as Kundalini, which rises through energy centres known as chakras
The objective of meditation is to reach a calm state of mind. Patanjali, in his Yoga Sutras, described five different states of mind: Ksipta, Mudha, Viksipta, Ekagra and Nirodha.

Ksipta defines a very agitated mind, unable to think, listen or remain quiet. It is jumping from one thought to another.
In Mudha no information seems to reach the brain; the person is absentminded.
Viksipta is a higher state where the mind receives information but is not able to process it. It moves from one thought to another, in a confused inner speech.
Ekagra is the state of a calm mind but not asleep. The person is focused and can pay attention.
Lastly Nirodha, when the mind is not disturbed by erratic thoughts, it is completely focused, as when you are meditating or totally centered in what you are doing.
The ultimate end of meditation according to Patanjali is the destruction of primal ignorance (avidya) and the realization of and establishment in the essential nature of the Self.

Swami Vivekananda describes meditation as follows:

"Meditation has been laid stress upon by all religions. The meditative state of mind is declared by the Yogis to be the highest state in which the mind exists. When the mind is studying the external object, it gets identified with it, loses itself. To use the simile of the old Indian philosopher: the soul of man is like a piece of crystal, but it takes the colour of whatever is near it. Whatever the soul touches ... it has to take its colour. That is the difficulty. That constitutes the bondage. The colour is so strong, the crystal forgets itself and identifies itself with the colour. Suppose a red flower is near the crystal and the crystal takes the colour and forgets itself, thinks it is red. We have taken the colour of the body and have forgotten what we are. All the difficulties that follow come from that one dead body. All our fears, all worries, anxieties, troubles, mistakes, weakness, evil, are from that one great blunder — that we are bodies. This is the ordinary person. It is the person taking the colour of the flower near to it. We are no more bodies than the crystal is the red flower.

The practice of meditation is pursued. The crystal knows what it is, takes its own colour. It is meditation that brings us nearer to truth than anything else. ..."

The Bhagavad Gita stresses the importance of meditation. The Sixth Chapter of Bhagavad Gita - "The Yoga of Meditation" describes the technique of meditation, and the characteristics of the Yogi who is well established in meditation. The Bhagavad Gita stresses the importance of meditation as follows "Make a habit of practising meditation and do not let your mind be distracted. In this way you will come finally to the Lord who is the light-giver, the highest of the high."




Meditation has always been central to Buddhism. The historical Buddha himself was said to have achieved enlightenment while meditating under a Bodhi tree. Most forms of Buddhism distinguish between two classes of meditation practices, shamatha and vipassana, both of which are necessary for attaining enlightenment. The former consists of practices aimed at developing the ability to focus the attention single-pointedly; the latter includes practices aimed at developing insight and wisdom through seeing the true nature of reality. The differentiation between the two types of meditation practices is not always clear cut, which is made obvious when studying practices such as Anapanasati which could be said to start off as a shamatha practice but that goes through a number of stages and ends up as a vipassana practice.

Theravada Buddhism emphasizes the meditative development of mindfulness (sati, see for example the Satipatthana Sutta) and concentration (samadhi, see kammatthana), as part of the Noble Eightfold Path, in the pursuit of Nibbana (Nirvana). Traditional popular meditation subjects include the breath (anapana) and loving-kindness (mettā).


Japanese Zen master Kodo Sawaki (1880-1965) in full lotus posture.In Japanese Mahayana schools, Tendai (Tien-tai), concentration is cultivated through highly structured ritual. Especially in the Chinese Chán Buddhism school (which branched out into the Japanese Zen, and Korean Seon schools), ts'o ch'an meditation and koan meditation practices allow a practitioner to directly experience the true nature of reality (each of the names of these schools derives from the Sanskrit dhyana, and translates into "meditation" in their respective languages). The esoteric Shingon sect shares many features with Tibetan Buddhism.

Tibetan Buddhism (Vajrayana) emphasizes tantra for its senior practitioners; hence its alternate name of Tantrayana Buddhism. Many monks go through their day without "meditating" in a recognizable form, but are more likely to chant or participate in group liturgy. In this tradition, the purpose of meditation is to awaken the sky-like nature of mind, and to introduce practitioners to that which they really are: unchanging pure awareness, which underlies the whole of life and death.

Meditation is the way to bring us back to ourselves, where we can really experience and taste our full being, beyond all habitual patterns. In the stillness and silence of meditation, we glimpse and return to that deep inner nature that we have so long ago lost sight of amid the business and distraction of our minds.

Most Buddhist traditions recognize that the path to Enlightenment entails three types of training: virtue (sīla); meditation (citta); and, wisdom (paññā).[17] Thus, meditative prowess alone is not sufficient; it is but one part of the path. In other words, in Buddhism, in tandem with mental cultivation, ethical development and wise understanding are also necessary for the attainment of the highest goal



Christian traditions have various practices which can be identified as forms of "meditation." Monastic traditions are the basis for many of these practices. Practices such as the rosary, the Adoration (focusing on the eucharist) in Catholicism or the hesychast tradition in Eastern Orthodoxy, may be compared to forms of Eastern meditation that focus on an individual object. Christian meditation is considered a form of prayer. Hesychastic practice, may involve recitation of the Jesus Prayer, thus "through the grace of God and one's own effort, to concentrate the nous in the heart." Prayer as a form of meditation of the heart is described in the Philokalia—a practice that leads towards Theosis which ignores the senses and results in inner stillness.

In 1975, the Benedictine monk, John Main introduced a form of meditation based on repetitive recitation of a prayer-phrase, traditionally the Aramaic phrase "Maranatha," meaning "Come, Oh Lord", as quoted at the end of both Corinthians and Revelation. The World Community for Christian Meditation was founded in 1991 to continue Main's work, which the Community describes as: "teaching Christian meditation as part of the great work of our time of restoring the contemplative dimension of Christian faith in the life of the church."

The Old Testament book of Joshua sets out a form of meditation based on scriptures: "Do not let this Book of the Law depart from your mouth; meditate on it day and night, so that you may be careful to do everything written in it, then you will be prosperous and successful" (Joshua 1:8). This is one of the reasons why bible verse memory is a practice among many evangelical Christians




Meditation in Islam is the core of its creed and way of life. In the five times a day (before dawn, noon, afternoon, sunset, and night) that a Muslim is obligated to pray, focusing and meditating on Allah through reciting Quran and dhikr is the core of this practice aimed at establishing the connection between Creator and creation, which in turn guides the soul to truth. Through these five times a day of meditating a Muslim is expected to maintain the spiritual peace he/she experiences through work, social and family life and every single aspect his awakeness, transforming his whole day to meditation, so that when he/she goes to sleep its nothing but another phase of meditation till the next morning (3 Al Emran verses 189-194) (6 Al Anaam verses 160 to 163).

Meditative quiescence is believed to have a quality of healing and creativity. The Muslim prophet Muhammad, whose deeds devout Muslims follow, spent long periods in meditation and contemplation. It was during one such period of meditation that Muhammad began to receive revelations of the Qur'an.

Two more concepts or schools of meditation in Islam:

Tafakkur and Tadabbur, literally meaning reflection upon the universe. Muslims feel this is a form of intellectual development which emanates from a higher level, i.e. from God. This intellectual process through the receiving of divine inspiration awakens and liberates the human mind, permitting man’s inner personality to develop and grow so that he may lead his life on a spiritual plane far above the mundane level. This is consistent with the global teachings of Islam, which views life as a test of our practice of submission to Allah, the one God.
The second form of meditation is the Sufi meditation, it is largely based on mystical exercises. However, this method is controversial among Muslim scholars. One group of Ulama, Al-Ghazzali, for instance, have accepted it, another group of Ulama, Ibn Taymiya, for instance, have rejected it as a bid'ah


There is evidence that Judaism has had meditative practices that go back thousands of years. For instance, in the Torah, the patriarch Isaac is described as going (lasuach) in the field—a term understood by all commentators as some type of meditative practice (Genesis 24:63), probably prayer.

Similarly, there are indications throughout the Tanach (the Hebrew Bible) that meditation was central to the prophets. In the Old Testament, there are two Hebrew words for meditation: hāgâ , which means to sigh or murmur, but also to meditate, and sîâ , which means to muse, or rehearse in one's mind.

In modern Jewish practice, one of the best known meditative practices is called hitbodedut ( or hisbodedus is explained in Kabbalah and Hassidic philosophy. The word hisbodedut, which derives from the Hebrew word "boded", (a state of being alone) and said to be related to the sfirah of Binah (lit. book of understanding), means the process of making oneself understand a concept well through analytical study.

Kabbalah is inherently a meditative field of study. Kabbalistic meditative practices construct a supernal realm which the soul navigates through in order to achieve certain ends. One of the most well known types of meditation is Merkabah, from the root /R-K-B/ meaning "chariot"(of God).




Taoism includes a number of meditative and contemplative traditions. Originally said to have their principles described in the I Ching, Tao Te Ching, Chuang Tzu and Tao Tsang among other texts; the multitude of schools relating to Qigong, Neigong, Daoyin and Zhan zhuang are a large, diverse array of breath training practises in aid of meditation with much influence from later Chinese Buddhism and with much influence on traditional Chinese medicine and the Chinese as well as some Japanese martial arts. The Chinese martial art T'ai Chi Ch'uan is named after the well-known focus for Taoist and Neo-Confucian meditation, the T'ai Chi T'u, and is often referred to as “meditation in motion”.

Often Taoist Internal martial arts, especially Tai Chi Chuan are thought of as moving meditation. A common phrase being, "movement in stillness" referring to energetic movement in passive Qigong and seated Taoist meditation; with the converse being "stillness in movement", a state of mental calm and meditation in the tai chi form.

[quote]Physical postures[/quotes]



Many meditative traditions teach that the spine should be kept "straight" (i.e. that the meditator should not slouch). Often this is explained as a way of encouraging the circulation of what some call "spiritual energy," the "vital breath", the "life force" (Sanskrit prana, Chinese qi, Latin spiritus) or the Kundalini. In some traditions the meditator may sit on a chair, flat-footed (as in New Thought); sit on a stool (as in Orthodox Christianity); or walk in mindfulness (as in Theravada Buddhism). Some traditions suggest being barefoot, for comfort, for convenience, or for spiritual reasons.

Other traditions, such as those related to kundalini yoga, take a less formal approach. While the basic practice in these traditions is also to sit still quietly in a traditional posture, they emphasize the possibility of kriyas - spontaneous yogic postures, changes in breathing patterns or emotional states, or perhaps repetitive physical movements such as swaying, etc., which may naturally arise as the practitioner sits in meditation, and which should not be resisted but rather allowed to express themselves in order to enhance the natural flow of energy through the body. This is said to help purify the nadis and ultimately deepen one's meditative practice



Various hand-gestures or mudras may be prescribed. These can carry theological meaning or according to Yogic philosophy can actually affect consciousness. For example, a common Buddhist hand-position is with the right hand resting atop the left (like the Buddha's begging bowl), with the thumbs touching.




In most meditative traditions, the eyes are closed. In some sects such as Zen, the eyes are half-closed, half open and looking slightly downward. In others such as Brahma Kumaris, the eyes are kept fully open.

Quiet is often held to be desirable, and some people use repetitive activities such as deep breathing, humming or chanting to help induce a meditative state.

In Sufism meditation (muraqaba) with eyes closed is called Varood while with open eyes is known as Shahood or Fa'tha.



Often such details are shared by more than one religion, even in cases where mutual influence seems unlikely. One example would be "navel-gazing," which is apparently attested within Eastern Orthodoxy as well as Chinese qigong practice. Another would be the practice of focusing on the breath, which is found in Orthodox Christianity, Sufism, and numerous Indic traditions.



Sitting cross-legged (or upon one's knees) for extended periods when one is not sufficiently limber, can result in a range of ergonomic complaints called "meditator's knee". Many meditative traditions do not require sitting cross legged.



How to Meditate

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Meditation For Dummies
http://www.textbooksrus.com/book_pics_large/0471777749.jpg

The Tao of Meditation: Way to Enlightenment
http://www.ninja-weapons.com/Books/Self%20Discovery/images/ISBN0804814.jpg

365 Tao: Daily Meditations
http://cdn.harpercollins.com/harperimages/isbn/large/0/9780062502230.jpg


If your into meditation and chi you should check out my previous threads touching on the subjects...


http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=51442

http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=52130

Fatal Guillotine
08-15-2008, 04:44 PM
thanks sidious appreciate that fam

The Void
08-16-2008, 12:55 AM
I completely forgot about what my brother did one time. He was in a lifegaurd class, the teacher wanted the students to check the others pulse to see if they could find it. My brother slowed down his heart rate to only one or two beats a minute. The guy trying to find it said, "dude, you're, like, dead..." The instructor came over and tried to find it and couldn't then asked if he was doing that on purpose, bro said no, instructor then got really mad. Funny stuff.

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-17-2008, 02:25 AM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...

What would be the point of stopping your heart beat?

to play dead...

People smart enough to wear jackets in the winter have been known to survive in the freezing cold too......

People without jackets may have to find other means of surviving freezing cold weather. Lets hope your never faced with such a situation. Stop trying to be a comedian...


I'm just saying if your gonna make claims like this back it up with a story or source. Give us somthing.

This, followed in the next post by this...

Some things I can vouch for are astral projection, foresight, and a physical awareness of the super natural through the 5 senses.

???

SHEM HETEP

WARPATH
08-17-2008, 10:51 AM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...
to play dead...
Interesting. I didn't think about that. If a person is wise enough in meditation to play dead, wouldn't the person be wise enough to keep your self from ever coming into a situation where they would have to play dead?


People without jackets may have to find other means of surviving freezing cold weather. Lets hope your never faced with such a situation. Stop trying to be a comedian...I mentioned it already, if your smart enough avoid a negative situation where you'll have to play dead, or out in the cold freezing without a jacket or fire to keep warm, then these meditation techniques are pointless and just for show. And I have been faced with situations where I was in sub zero temperatures, during my stay in the arctic circle, and yes I was smart enough to know I would need a coat.



This, followed in the next post by this...

The Sun Dance
Of all the ceremonies practiced by the Lakota (indeed most of the Plains Indians) the Sun Dance was the most important.
It was a time of renewal, both of the tribe and of the People and the earth. As many bands as possible would come together for this annual rite.
The village would therefore be huge usually with each tribe camping within their own circle and this circle being part of another circle.
A large circular arena would be cleared and a double ring of sticks would be erected around the outside with branches placed on the top as shelter for the dancers, singers and spectators.
The Holy Men would go into the forest and select a tree to be used as the central pole. A man would then be selected because of a great deed or feat of bravery to ‘count coup’ on the tree which would then be cut down. As it fell it was not allowed to touch the ground. The tree would then be trimmed and taken back to the dance site, decorated and erected in the middle of the arena.
The next day the dancing would begin at sunrise. Anyone who wanted to dance could do so. The dancers looked at the sun as they danced. Short breaks were allowed but no food or drink was taken. This part of the dance would go on for four days usually while the self-sacrificers prepared themselves.
These people (usually men – it was incredibly rare for a woman to do this) were those who wanted something in particular; good hunting skills, better fighting skills, or something like the curing of a sick relative.
Their bodies and spirits would be purified before the dance and they would each have a mentor to help them through the ordeal. This would be either a Holy man or someone who had already done it themselves.
The Holy Men would have prepared buffalo skulls and these would be placed around the arena. Long lengths of rawhide would be tied to the central pole. The dancers would wear rings of sage on their heads and maybe around their wrists and ankles. Each would carry a whistle made from the wing bone of an eagle.
As they stood around the arena the holy men would approach them and pierce each side of their chests with a length of bone. The rawhide thongs would then be attached to the bone. The dance would then begin, a slow shuffling dance to begin with. Others would choose not to be tethered to the pole in this way. They would have the bones put through their backs and buffalo skulls would then be attached with thongs. The dancers would then drag these heavy skulls around as they danced.
The whole idea of the dance was to remove the bone pieces from your body. The dancers at the pole would pull themselves backwards, trying to tear their flesh and release themselves. Those with skulls attached to their backs would dance over rocks and through bushes hoping to catch the skulls on something and having them ripped from their bodies.
Any who had not released themselves close to sundown were allowed help from their mentors. These men would grab the dancers from behind and jerk them backwards in an effort to tear the bones from the skin.
At sundown, any not released in this way would have the bones removed by the Holy Men in a reverse to the way they went in.
Those who danced in this way would normally be traumatised by the experience. Certainly shock would set in. They were removed to the sacrificers lodge and tended by the medicine men of the village. The Holy Men would also be in attendance, singing their praises to the gods and praying that they will recover swiftly. (This is a very abridged version of events. I have not explained the purification rites or other parts of the process in respect for my religion and to stop those who would steal it for their own means.)

Source:

http://www.lakotawritings.com/The_Sun_Dance_Ritual.htm


--------------------------------------------

This is just a short description of the ritual battle. The fast if for four days in the summer without water. I just thought I'd bring in another point of view because people are talking about monks and what not and how they meditate. This is how the warrior tribes do it. I wasn't trying to make farce of a otherwise decent thread.

-----------------------------------------------------

Aglow with the luminance of the red hot stones, the ceremony begins in the lodge. The sweat leader sounds the Water Drum and calls forth the spirit guides in prayer from the Four Directions. The sweat leader then dips water and pours it onto the hot stones in the pit, producing large amounts of steam, usually one dipper for each of the four directions, or until he is told by the spirits to stop. Then he begins his prayers, songs and chants.

for more information- source:

http://www.barefootsworld.net/sweatlodge.html

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-17-2008, 11:04 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...

Interesting. I didn't think about that. If a person is wise enough in meditation to play dead, wouldn't the person be wise enough to keep your self from ever coming into a situation where they would have to play dead?

Interesting theory but life doesn't exactly work that way.

I mentioned it already, if your smart enough avoid a negative situation where you'll have to play dead, or out in the cold freezing without a jacket or fire to keep warm, then these meditation techniques are pointless and just for show. And I have been faced with situations where I was in sub zero temperatures, during my stay in the arctic circle, and yes I was smart enough to know I would need a coat.

As I mentioned already life doesn't work that way. People everyday are faced with situations that they cannot prepare for intellectually. You cannot avoid negative situations (certainly not all of them anyway) in life, these are the situations where you grow spiritually.

In the end, regardless of whether or not these meditations techniques are for show, the point is, and was when I mentioned it in my original post, that these things are possible because the meditative state is one of unification between the conscious and sub-conscious. You want something a little more practical. No worries...

The meditative state is the key to changing unwanted behaviour patterns. Many of our emotions and actions happen without our controlling them. Some of these emotions and actions can be detrimental both to our self and to others. They are often learned during the indiscriminate imitation that goes on in the early part of our life, they also may be carried on from previous lives. The ability to go into trance and change these behaviours is one of the most important aspects of meditation.

SHEM HETEP

WARPATH
08-17-2008, 11:11 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...



Interesting theory but life doesn't exactly work that way.



As I mentioned already life doesn't work that way. People everyday are faced with situations that they cannot prepare for intellectually. You cannot avoid negative situations (certainly not all of them anyway) in life, these are the situations where you grow spiritually.

In the end, regardless of whether or not these meditations techniques are for show, the point is, and was when I mentioned it in my original post, that these things are possible because the meditative state is one of unification between the conscious and sub-conscious. You want something a little more practical. No worries...

The meditative state is the key to changing unwanted behaviour patterns. Many of our emotions and actions happen without our controlling them. Some of these emotions and actions can be detrimental both to our self and to others. They are often learned during the indiscriminate imitation that goes on in the early part of our life, they also may be carried on from previous lives. The ability to go into trance and change these behaviours is one of the most important aspects of meditation.

SHEM HETEP

If someone could stop their heart beat, they would black out. Then their heart would start beating again.

WARPATH
08-17-2008, 11:24 PM
Heart Beat Stop Magic Trick Revealed (http://www.metacafe.com/watch/740922/heartbeat_stop_magic_trick_revealed/)


^^CLICK^^

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-17-2008, 11:37 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings...

If someone could stop their heart beat, they would black out. Then their heart would start beating again.

True. Maybe I didn't word my post the best. Stopping the heart beat is probably not best way to put it. Slowing it down to a dramatically decreased bpm is probably better. The fact is everyones heart stops for a length of time all the time, there is a point in between beats. The question is how long can that pause be in between beats.


I completely forgot about what my brother did one time. He was in a lifegaurd class, the teacher wanted the students to check the others pulse to see if they could find it. My brother slowed down his heart rate to only one or two beats a minute. The guy trying to find it said, "dude, you're, like, dead..." The instructor came over and tried to find it and couldn't then asked if he was doing that on purpose, bro said no, instructor then got really mad. Funny stuff.


The pause in between beats in the above case would be a length of 20 maybe 30 seconds. Thats long enough in some situations to play dead. I did not mean to imply that people can stop their heartbeats and continue living a long and comfortable life without blood being fed to their muscles and organs. Sorry if it seemed that way. As I said before the point is the unification of the conscious and sub-conscious/involuntary functions of the body. Maybe the best wording that I should have chosen is: Masters of meditation have been known to be able to consciously control their heart beat.

Anyway lets not get hung up on it. P.E.A.C.E...

SHEM HETEP

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-17-2008, 11:46 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings...

Heart Beat Stop Magic Trick Revealed (http://www.metacafe.com/watch/740922/heartbeat_stop_magic_trick_revealed/)


^^CLICK^^

Not able to watch that video at this point in time, will check it out later. Regardless, I am not interested in magic tricks...

http://www.noetic.org/research/medbiblio/ch1.htm

This has some good stuff. Once again I apologise for not wording my original post correctly. Let me re-emphasise that the point is the conscious control over subconscious/involuntary functions of the body.

SHEM HETEP

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-17-2008, 11:49 PM
The volume of your ejaculate can vary, depending on how well hydrated you are and how many times you've ejaculated within a short period of time. The average ejaculate measures around a half-teaspoon, though it may reach a little over a teaspoon. During a single sexual experience, the volume of ejaculate is greatest the first time you cum, and less for each subsequent load. "Remember the law of diminishing returns," says Franklin Lowe, M.D., M.P.H., F.A.C.S., associate director of Urology at St. Luke's/Roosevelt Hospital Center in New York, NY.


Meditate on that for a while.

Meanwhile...

...this did nothing to debunk what I originaly wrote on meditation and sexual performance (if that was your intentions. If not, disregard).

SHEM HETEP

WARPATH
08-18-2008, 09:34 AM
Meanwhile...

...this did nothing to debunk what I originaly wrote on meditation and sexual performance (if that was your intentions. If not, disregard).

SHEM HETEP

People meditating so they can have a hard-on all the time and bust super massive loads is mad perverted son.

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-18-2008, 07:33 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...

People meditating so they can have a hard-on all the time and bust super massive loads is mad perverted son.

I said nothing about having a hard-on all the time, or anything about busting super massive loads. I stressed the importance of not spilling the seed. Sounds like your the perverted one...and I'm not your son.

SHEM HETEP

WARPATH
08-19-2008, 09:25 AM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...

I said nothing about having a hard-on all the time, or anything about busting super massive loads. I stressed the importance of not spilling the seed. Sounds like your the perverted one...and I'm not your son.

SHEM HETEP

Peace Golden Falcon,

I call my brother sun because he shines like one. I wasn't calling you a pervert, but you say it likes it's bad. Let me point out what you said:




Also, meditation cultivates the Life Force (Ra) within. This is our portion of the creative power of the universe. It is the sexual power and diminishes everytime you spill your seed. Diminished sexual power leads to a decrease in vitality and in your libido, which can lead to erectile dysfunction.

SHEM HETEP


An increased vitality in your libido would mean being easily stimulated all the time with a large sperm count. And with a larger sperm count would mean a desire to spill your seed. If you ain't spilling it in your woman your thinking about spilling it somewhere (and for a priest the result is victimizing little boys). Anyone spilling their seed will tell you they don't have a problem keeping it up. Someone meditating to keep this up would probably be thinking about sex all the time. Probably. Life needs to go on. Nothing wrong with that.

However, this life force that you claim men have is nothing but half a blue print. Women carry the children, feed the children with their body, and build the children. Women hold all the power when it comes to a life giving force. It's the reason they are connected with the moon in their menstrual cycle, and very powerful during.

LoTec
08-19-2008, 01:38 PM
Good thread, props to all postive contributors

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-19-2008, 10:44 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...

Peace Golden Falcon,

I call my brother sun because he shines like one.

Ok thats all peace.

So is what you wrote next. Let me just clear up a few things regarding some possible misunderstandings of my views...

An increased vitality in your libido would mean being easily stimulated all the time with a large sperm count. And with a larger sperm count would mean a desire to spill your seed. If you ain't spilling it in your woman your thinking about spilling it somewhere (and for a priest the result is victimizing little boys). Anyone spilling their seed will tell you they don't have a problem keeping it up. Someone meditating to keep this up would probably be thinking about sex all the time. Probably. Life needs to go on. Nothing wrong with that.

I am in no way advocating abstinence and I agree 100% that the reason behind why there's priests molesting little boys is because of the practice of abstinence without an understanding of how to do it correctly (it can be done correctly although there is little reason to).

However, this life force that you claim men have is nothing but half a blue print.

I never claimed that it was only men who have the life force within, and you seem to be under the impression that I am saying that the life force is the semen. Not my intention. It is simply one of the creative expressions of the life force. The life force that is behind sexual desire can be channelled into many other forms of creative expression.

Women carry the children, feed the children with their body, and build the children. Women hold all the power when it comes to a life giving force. It's the reason they are connected with the moon in their menstrual cycle, and very powerful during.

True indeed. When it comes to creating a human life women do indeed hold the power. Man plants the seed. This formula is in place everywhere, all the time. This is why the life force is given a female personification (shakti) in the ancient traditions of the Indus Valley.

Within Man (the being not the specific gender) we find the formula when ever we partake of any conscious action:

Thought (Seed/Man) ---unfies with ---Life Force (Egg/Woman)
to bring about action.

SHEM HETEP

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-20-2008, 06:09 AM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings...

...following on from my previous post:

The key to taking control of ones life is unifying the Will with the Power.

Misconception: I cannot kick [insert specific bad habit here] because I lack willpower.

The will has no power!

They are opposite, yet inseperable polarities of the one.

This is easily seen in the amount of times people say they will do something but it never gets done.

The will must be unified with the power. This is the formula for creation. The seed must be planted in fertile soil to bring forth the plant. The seed must unify with the egg to bring forth the child. The will must be unified with the Life Force (power) to bring forth action.

This is why meditation is so important. The state of trance that is brought about through meditation is the state that unifies the will and the life force. Most of our actions and emotions in everyday life are preprogrammed automatic responses to situations. Many of these actions and emotions are less than healthy and often detrimental to ones Spirit as well as other people. And they are often reinforced because we go into trance many times everyday when we "daydream" as well as when we go into stong emotional states. The thoughts that we take into these states of trance often determine how we end up acting in similar situations in the future.

The meditative state is a controlled state of trance where one is not over whelmed emotionally so as to consciously reprogram ones Spirit to react emotionally and in action to situations so that they are in accordance with the Laws of the Universe (Maat).

SHEM HETEP

WARPATH
08-20-2008, 09:52 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...



Ok thats all peace.

So is what you wrote next. Let me just clear up a few things regarding some possible misunderstandings of my views...



I am in no way advocating abstinence and I agree 100% that the reason behind why there's priests molesting little boys is because of the practice of abstinence without an understanding of how to do it correctly (it can be done correctly although there is little reason to).



I never claimed that it was only men who have the life force within, and you seem to be under the impression that I am saying that the life force is the semen. Not my intention. It is simply one of the creative expressions of the life force. The life force that is behind sexual desire can be channelled into many other forms of creative expression.



True indeed. When it comes to creating a human life women do indeed hold the power. Man plants the seed. This formula is in place everywhere, all the time. This is why the life force is given a female personification (shakti) in the ancient traditions of the Indus Valley.

Within Man (the being not the specific gender) we find the formula when ever we partake of any conscious action:

Thought (Seed/Man) ---unfies with ---Life Force (Egg/Woman)
to bring about action.

SHEM HETEP

Alright, we're almost on the same wave length. I would have to disagree with males having the seed though. Metaphorically speaking semen is more like fertilizer (and still not even that) but we don't need hand book on how babys are born. It just boils down to difference in ideology and that's getting off topic.

I'm more interested in the spiritual aspect in meditation, however, for the most part I do agree that fasting + meditation, will lead to increase in libido.

Face of the Golden Falcon
08-20-2008, 10:03 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...


I'm more interested in the spiritual aspect in meditation, however, for the most part I do agree that fasting + meditation, will lead to increase in libido.

What are your thoughts on what I wrote regarding reprogramming ones behaviour through meditation?

SHEM HETEP

WARPATH
08-20-2008, 10:15 PM
P.E.A.C.E and Blessings Slippy...



What are your thoughts on what I wrote regarding reprogramming ones behavior through meditation?

SHEM HETEP

I think you make a good point. Sometimes you have to step outside yourself and look at you behavior to see what you need to do to change it. :stroke: