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View Full Version : Yet another reason for idiots not to be texting while operating a vehicle..


check two
09-15-2008, 10:33 AM
I know trains are a little different than cars, but they should make it a nationwide ban to text message and talk on the phone while driving. I've talked about it before, but accidents are happening left and right cause of people texting and talking on their phones while driving.

---Feds look into texting before deadly train crash

LOS ANGELES - Federal officials investigating a commuter rail collision that killed 25 people said they want to review cell phone records to determine if an engineer blamed for running a stop signal before the crash may have been text messaging at the time.

With no answer on the cause of Friday's crash, a smaller number of commuters than normal returned to the rails Monday morning.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa boarded one of the morning's earliest trains.

"I want to dispel any fears about taking the train," the mayor said. "Safety has to be our number one concern, and while accidents can and do happen, taking the train is still one of the safest and fastest options for commuters."

The National Transportation Safety Board confirmed on Sunday that the engineer, who was killed in the crash, had failed to stop at the final red signal.

NTSB experts are planning to review the cell phone records of two 14-year-old boys and the engineer after the teens told CBS2-TV that they received a text message from the engineer shortly before the crash.

The Los Angeles station said the teen was among a group of youths who befriended the engineer and asked him questions about his work.

NTSB board member Kitty Higgins said investigators did not find a cell phone belonging to the engineer in the wreckage but would request his cell phone records, as well as those of the boys.

"We are going to be obtaining records from their cell phones and from the cell phones of the deceased engineer and will use our subpoena authority or whatever other legal authority we need and to begin to determine exactly what happened and what if any role that might have played in this accident," she said Sunday.

The commuter train carrying 220 people rolled past stop signals Friday and barreled head-on into a Union Pacific train in Chatsworth. The accident, the nation's deadliest rail disaster in 15 years, left train cars so mangled that some bodies had to be removed in pieces. The crash injured 138 people.

Also Monday, the Metrolink spokeswoman who announced Saturday that the engineer's mistake caused the crash resigned. She said the railroad's board called her announcement "premature," even though NTSB officials later backed it up.

Metrolink did not return phone messages on the resignation.

NTSB investigators said Sunday that the train failed to stop at the final red signal, which forced the train onto a track at 42 mph where the Union Pacific freight was traveling in the opposite direction, Higgins said at a news conference.

Higgins said she believed the crash could have been prevented with technology that stops a train on the track when a signal is disobeyed. The technology was not in place where the collision occurred.

"I believe this technology could have prevented the accident. If he ran the signal the train would have been stopped. I've seen it tested. It makes a difference," she said.

Higgins said audio recordings from the commuter train indicate a period of silence as it passed the last two signals before the fiery wreck, a time when the engineer and the conductor should have been performing verbal safety checks.

She cautioned, however, that the train may have entered a dead zone where the recording was interrupted.

Higgins said the NTSB would measure the distance between the signals along the track on Monday. Investigators also want to interview the conductor, who was injured, about the recording, she said.

"He'll be able to tell us whether he recalls the engineer calling out and him confirming those signals," Higgins said.

Data show that the Metrolink train ran the red light signal with devastating consequences.

"The Metrolink train went through the signal, did not observe the red signal and essentially forced open this section of the switch," Higgins said. "The switch bars were bent like a banana. It should be perfectly straight."

Higgins said experts still must examine whether the signal was working properly and were in the Metrolink engineer's line of sight.

However, she stressed that obeying signals on the track was an engineer's responsibility at the helm of a train.

"My understanding is it is very unusual for an experienced engineer to run a red light," she said.

Metrolink said earlier Sunday that a dispatcher tried to warn the engineer of the commuter train that he was about to collide with a freight train but the call came too late. The dispatcher reached the conductor in the rear of the train, but by then it had already crashed into the oncoming Union Pacific train, Metrolink officials said.

However, the NTSB contradicted Metrolink's report. Higgins said that the dispatcher noticed something was wrong, but before he could contact the train, the conductor who survived called in to report the wreck.

The collision occurred on a horseshoe-shaped section of track in Chatsworth at the west end of the San Fernando Valley, near a 500-foot-long tunnel underneath Stoney Point Park.

The commuter train was heading from Union Station in downtown Los Angeles to Ventura County. The impact rammed the Metrolink engine backward, jamming it deep into the first passenger car.

It was the deadliest passenger train crash since Sept. 22, 1993, when Amtrak's Sunset Limited plunged off a trestle into a bayou near Mobile, Ala., moments after the trestle was damaged by a towboat; 47 people were killed.

-news.yahoo.com

EAGLE EYE
09-15-2008, 10:40 AM
I already looked into this story. There is more of a chance that the conductor had a heart attack as being the sole reason the crash happened. He had 12 years of experience with no bad track record. This is just media hype, and also probably hype funded by the lobbyist that are currently trying to pass legislation to make it illegal to drive a car and text.

Ok?

KERZO
09-15-2008, 10:41 AM
wow thats long...maybe one day i'll read it. :mexico:

check two
09-15-2008, 10:49 AM
I didn't realize that there were a bunch of lobbyists trying to make it illegal to talk and text while driving. You would think by now that those evil jabronies would have gotten more laws passed about this situation. Cause this would actually be a good law for a change.

EAGLE EYE
09-15-2008, 10:54 AM
you would think at this point in time trains would have gps sensor type equipment that would autmatically shut them down if two trains within a certain range are in danger of collision..


but it does take a lot to stop a fast moving train

check two
09-16-2008, 10:00 AM
---California seeks train operator cell phone ban

LOS ANGELES - Amid a federal investigation into whether a commuter train engineer was texting before a deadly collision with another train, the state's top rail safety regulator is seeking an emergency order banning train operators from using cell phones.

"Some railroad operators may have policies prohibiting the personal use of such devices, but they're widely ignored," Michael Peevey, president of the California Public Utilities Commission, said Monday. "Our order would make it the law and we'll go after violators. We owe it to the public."

The commission has scheduled a vote on the order Thursday.

The collision between the Metrolink train and a Union Pacific freight train killed 25 people and injured 138 people — the deadliest rail disaster in the U.S. in 15 years.

Metrolink has blamed its engineer for not heeding a red light signal designed to prevent such wrecks, and the National Transportation Safety Board is reviewing whether the engineer was text messaging.

Investigators did not find a cell phone belonging to Robert Sanchez in the wreckage, but two teenage train buffs who befriended him told KCBS-TV that they received a text message from him a minute before the crash.

Kitty Higgins, an NTSB board member, said her agency issued a subpoena Monday to get the engineer's cell phone records. She said Verizon Wireless has five days to respond to the subpoena request.

Higgins also said tests at the crash site showed the signals are working properly and there were no obstructions that may have prevented the engineer from seeing the red light.

"The question is, did he see it as red?" Higgins said. "Did he see it as something else? Did he see it at all?"

NTSB experts prepared to conduct a simulated crash test on Tuesday.

On Monday some commuters — many wary and emotional — returned to the rail line on the first day of service since the accident. Regular commuters said the train load was much lighter than usual.

Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa tried to reassure them the trains are safe.

"I want to dispel any fears about taking the train," he said. "Safety has to be our No. 1 concern, and while accidents can and do happen, taking the train is still one of the safest and fastest options for commuters."

The NTSB said the commuter train, which carried 220 people, rolled past stop signals at 42 mph and forced its way onto a track where a Union Pacific freight was barreling toward it.

The collision occurred at a curve in the track just short of where a 500-foot-long tunnel separates the San Fernando Valley neighborhood of Chatsworth from Simi Valley in Ventura County.

About a dozen bouquets were strung the length of the loading platform at the Simi Valley station as passengers Monday boarded buses and were shuttled to the Chatsworth station, bypassing the tracks still being cleared of wreckage.

Commuters will use the buses again Tuesday morning.

Jerry Romero, who normally takes a Metrolink train home but skipped it Friday to pick up a bicycle, said he was disturbed by reports that the engineer may have been texting.

"That would be pretty disturbing in respect to what we're going through as a society, this fascination we have with gizmos," he said.

In 2003, the NTSB recommended that the Federal Railroad Administration regulate the use of cell phones by railroad employees on duty after finding that a coal train engineer's phone use contributed to a May 2002 accident in which two freight trains collided head-on near Clarendon, Texas. The coal train engineer was killed and the conductor and engineer of the other train were critically injured.

Metrolink prohibits rail workers from using cell phones on the job, but there is no existing federal regulation regarding the use of cell phones by railroad employees on the job, FRA spokesman Steven Kulm said.

Audio recordings of contact between Sanchez and the conductor on the Metrolink show they were regularly communicating verbal safety checks about signals along the track until a period of radio silence as the train passed the final two signals before the wreck. The tapes captured Sanchez confirming a flashing yellow light before pulling out of the Chatsworth station.

The train may have entered a dead zone where the recording was interrupted. Investigators tried to interview the conductor about the lapse Monday, but he declined because a company representative was not able to be present, Higgins said. He is still hospitalized with serious injuries.

A computer indicated the last signal before the collision displayed a red light, and experts tested the signals Monday and determined they were working properly.

On Tuesday they planned to take actual Metrolink and Union Pacific trains to recreate the events leading up to the accident and to test the signals further.

-news.yahoo.com

SKANK HILL
09-16-2008, 10:11 AM
I didn't realize that there were a bunch of lobbyists trying to make it illegal to talk and text while driving. You would think by now that those evil jabronies would have gotten more laws passed about this situation. Cause this would actually be a good law for a change.

banned in the state i live in in my country ... get caught pay massive fines upwards of near $500 i think

STYLE
09-16-2008, 10:52 AM
lots of states already have "hands free cellpone" laws, where u have to use a headset but texting is still legal. huh? when i see a dumbass trying to text and drive, i honk at the muhfukka. i mean why not read a newspaper and have a bowl of soup while your at it?

idk texting is such a niche fad. i can't see texting lasting more than 5 more yrs. soon it will be voice to text, meaning you speak and the device types it.

this info comes from my pops an exec at motorola.
oh an they also are coming out with a miniprojector phone that will allow monitor/tv size screen/resolution for watching mobile media and web.
http://www.cellaz.com/photos/news/1308.jpg

check two
09-16-2008, 01:02 PM
Here's some info to check out concerning cell phone and texting laws for each state in the US. It looks like only 5 states so far have text messaging bans.

http://www.ghsa.org/html/stateinfo/laws/cellphone_laws.html

http://www.drivinglaws.org/states.php

check two
09-18-2008, 02:05 PM
---Texting while driving 'more dangerous than drugs or alcohol'

LONDON (AFP) - Texting behind the wheel is more dangerous than driving while under the influence of alcohol or cannabis, researchers said Thursday.

Research carried out on 17 young drivers (aged 17-24) using a simulator found that reaction time slowed by 35% when they were writing or reading text messages while driving. In comparison, reaction time deteriorated by 21% for those under the influence of cannabis, and by 12% at the legal alcohol limit.

Transport Research Laboratory (TRL) -- which carried out the study for the RAC Foundation -- also found that steering control worsened by 91% for those who were distracted by texts, compared to 35% when cannabis was involved.

The tests also showed that texters were less able to maintain safe distances from other cars and they tended to drift out of their lane more often.

RAC Foundation director Stephen Glaister said the research "clearly shows that a motorist who is texting is significantly more impaired than a motorist at the legal limit for alcohol."

TRL researcher Nick Reed added: "When texting, drivers are distracted by taking their hand off the wheel to use their phone, by trying to read small text on the phone display, and by thinking about how to write their message. This combination of factors resulted in the impairments to reaction time and vehicle control that place the driver at a greater risk than having consumed alcohol to the legal limit for driving."

Nearly half of all drivers aged 18 to 24 in Britain admit to texting while driving, according to an earlier RAC poll of over 2000 young drivers.

-news.yahoo.com

Dokuro
09-18-2008, 02:12 PM
dude my cusin was on that train

Dokuro
09-18-2008, 02:14 PM
oh and we all know the accident was caused by general wise jaking of on the traks

Killa BB
09-18-2008, 05:07 PM
lots of states already have "hands free cellpone" laws, where u have to use a headset but texting is still legal. huh? when i see a dumbass trying to text and drive, i honk at the muhfukka. i mean why not read a newspaper and have a bowl of soup while your at it?

idk texting is such a niche fad. i can't see texting lasting more than 5 more yrs. soon it will be voice to text, meaning you speak and the device types it.

this info comes from my pops an exec at motorola.
oh an they also are coming out with a miniprojector phone that will allow monitor/tv size screen/resolution for watching mobile media and web.




Thanx Gav!^O^

check two
09-19-2008, 12:09 AM
It was now confirmed that the train engineer was text messaging while on the job:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080919/ap_on_re_us/train_collision