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EAGLE EYE
11-18-2008, 12:18 AM
Entertainment (http://www.wired.com/entertainment) : The Web (http://www.wired.com/entertainment/theweb) http://www.wired.com/images/icon_rss.gif (http://feeds.wired.com/wired/entertainment/theweb)
Twitter, Flickr, Facebook Make Blogs Look So 2004

By Paul Boutin http://www.wired.com/images/icon_email.gif (http://www.wired.com/services/feedback/letterstoeditor) 10.20.08
http://www.wired.com/images/zoom.gif (http://www.wired.com/entertainment/theweb/magazine/16-11/st_essay#)
Photo: Todd Tankersley


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Thinking about launching your own blog? Here's some friendly advice: Don't. And if you've already got one, pull the plug.
Writing a weblog today isn't the bright idea it was four years ago. The blogosphere, once a freshwater oasis of folksy self-expression and clever thought, has been flooded by a tsunami of paid bilge. Cut-rate journalists and underground marketing campaigns now drown out the authentic voices of amateur wordsmiths. It's almost impossible to get noticed, except by hecklers. And why bother? The time it takes to craft sharp, witty blog prose is better spent expressing yourself on Flickr, Facebook, or Twitter.
If you quit now, you're in good company. Notorious chatterbox Jason Calacanis made millions from his Weblogs (http://www.weblogsinc.com/) network. But he flat-out retired (http://calacanis.com/2008/07/11/official-announcement-regarding-my-retirement-from-blogging/) his own blog in July. "Blogging is simply too big, too impersonal, and lacks the intimacy that drew me to it," he wrote in his final post.
Impersonal is correct: Scroll down Technorati's list of the top 100 (http://technorati.com/pop/blogs/) blogs and you'll find personal sites have been shoved aside by professional ones. Most are essentially online magazines: The Huffington Post. Engadget. TreeHugger. A stand-alone commentator can't keep up with a team of pro writers cranking out up to 30 posts a day.
When blogging was young, enthusiasts rode high, with posts quickly skyrocketing to the top of Google's search results for any given topic, fueled by generous links from fellow bloggers. In 2002, a search for "Mark" ranked Web developer Mark Pilgrim above author Mark Twain. That phenomenon was part of what made blogging so exciting. No more. Today, a search for, say, Barack Obama's latest speech will deliver a Wikipedia page, a Fox News article, and a few entries from professionally run sites like Politico.com. The odds of your clever entry appearing high on the list? Basically zero.
That said, your blog will still draw the Net's lowest form of life: The insult commenter. Pour your heart out in a post, and some anonymous troll named r0rschach or foohack is sure to scribble beneath it, "Lame. Why don't you just suck McCain's ass." That's why Calacanis has retreated to a private mailing list. He can talk to his fans directly, without having to suffer idiotic retorts from anonymous Jason-haters.
Further, text-based Web sites aren't where the buzz is anymore. The reason blogs took off is that they made publishing easy for non-techies. Part of that simplicity was a lack of support for pictures, audio, and videoclips. At the time, multimedia content was too hard to upload, too unlikely to play back, and too hungry for bandwidth.
Social multimedia sites like YouTube, Flickr, and Facebook have since made publishing pics and video as easy as typing text. Easier, if you consider the time most bloggers spend fretting over their words. Take a clue from Robert Scoble (http://scobleizer.com/), who made his name as Microsoft's "technical evangelist" blogger from 2003 to 2006. Today, he focuses on posting videos and Twitter updates. "I keep my blog mostly for long-form writing," he says.
Twitter — which limits each text-only post to 140 characters — is to 2008 what the blogosphere was to 2004. You'll find Scoble, Calacanis, and most of their buddies from the golden age there. They claim it's because Twitter operates even faster than the blogosphere. And Twitter posts can be searched instantly, without waiting for Google to index them.
As a writer, though, I'm onto the system's real appeal: brevity. Bloggers today are expected to write clever, insightful, witty prose to compete with Huffington and The New York Times. Twitter's character limit puts everyone back on equal footing. It lets amateurs quit agonizing over their writing and cut to the chase. @WiredReader: Kill yr blog. 2004 over. Google won't find you. Too much cruft from HuffPo, NYT. Commenters are tards. C u on Facebook?
Paul Boutin (paul@valleywag.com) is a correspondent for the Silicon Valley gossip site Valleywag.






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LOOKS LIKE WUTANG CORP AINT ON THE CUTTING EDGE ANYMORE NOW IS IT?




IMAGINE FOLLOWING TSA'S TWITTER FEED?




IT WOULD BE CONSTANT UPDATES SAYING


"IM GONNA GO JACK OFF"
"MY WISDOM BUILDS YOU FAGGIT"
"IM GONNA GO JACK OFF"

EAGLE EYE
11-18-2008, 12:20 AM
This Entire Article Has Me On The Edge Of My Seat

Koolish
11-18-2008, 12:28 AM
what the fuck is twitter anyways?

from what i know it's basically facebook has that "So and So is...", and twitter is nothing but that.

EAGLE EYE
11-18-2008, 12:34 AM
what the fuck is twitter anyways?

from what i know it's basically facebook has that "So and So is...", and twitter is nothing but that.


CORRECT. More business and IT people who dont have a need for a Facebook or Myspace account use it, and can use it on smart phones like iPhones, Blackberry, Android, etc

TSA
11-18-2008, 12:49 AM
i'll read this after jacking off, but LOL anyone remember when stylemaster thought BLOGgINZ was the future of wucorp and e-civilization

god i miss that wile ol koot

Art Vandelay
11-18-2008, 01:11 AM
^^

http://www.flyvirginairlines.co.uk/virgin_logo.jpg

The Hound
11-18-2008, 01:19 AM
i only use myspace so i can hear the latest PCP rekkkidz ...