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View Full Version : The UK to monitor everyone's e-mails and internet traffic for the next year?


check two
04-06-2009, 05:56 PM
? lol


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In a move that even the most nonchalant of privacy advocates is crying foul over, the UK has put into effect a European Union directive which mandates the archival of information regarding virtually all internet traffic for the next 12 months. The program formally goes into effect today.

The data retention rules require the archival of all email traffic (the identities of the sender and receiver, but not the contents of the messages), records of VOIP telephone calls (traditional phone calls are already monitored), and information about every website visited by any computer user in the country. The rules are being pushed down "across the board to even the smallest company," as every ISP large or small will be required to collect and store the data. That data will then be accessible -- to fight "crime and terrorism," of course -- by "hundreds of public bodies" to investigate whatever crimes they see fit.

Technically the new directive applies to all countries of the EU, but individual nations appear to be complying with the rules to various degrees. Privacy-obsessed Sweden is reportedly ignoring the rule completely, for example.

The privacy implications of the rule are enormous, as everything UK citizens do online will now be under the watchful eye of EU's powerful Home Office. One privacy advocate, whose anger is clearly barely being held back, called it "the kind of technology that the Stasi would have dreamed of." Naturally, the government counters that this kind of information has already proven invaluable in tracking down criminals, including the killer of an 11-year-old boy a couple of years ago.

Privacy concerns aside, another issue becomes one of how exactly to manage all this data. A report dating back to 2004 estimated that a single, large ISP in the UK would need up to 40 million gigabytes of storage capacity to store the traffic data from a year of user activity. Even in 2009, that kind of storage doesn't come cheap, nor does the challenge of managing it all come easy.

-tech.yahoo.com

HANZO
04-06-2009, 06:01 PM
da fuk

i call for a REVOLUTION

Ghost In The 'Lac
04-06-2009, 06:06 PM
wow...lol. thats insane on some real KGB shit.

how the fuck do you store that much information anyway?

how did they get all the ISP's to agree to this huge increase in effort and spending? surely the isp's wouldve challanged in court? as its of no advantage to their business and the interest of shareholders (which is law)

Tage
04-06-2009, 06:47 PM
this is bullshit, and pretty much illegal under the data protection act.

give us a proper link and stop scaremongering.

edit - ok, i just read it.. what the fuck? its gonna be pretty hard to search through all those bastards.

check two
04-06-2009, 06:50 PM
Here's your full proper link. lol :

http://tech.yahoo.com/blogs/null/136610

And here's another article on it which I didn't read yet:

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/technology/technologynews/5105519/Internet-records-to-be-stored-for-a-year.html

Uncle Steezo
04-06-2009, 07:11 PM
applies to all EU nations.

i guess yall are fukked in the game.

lol

big brother conspiracy bullshit huh?

the shit is out in the open now.

Visionz
04-06-2009, 07:13 PM
if you live in Europe, I'm not sending you SHIT :b

Uncle Steezo
04-06-2009, 07:16 PM
they gonna make the wucorp block hot.


i vote to permaban all euros.

check two
04-06-2009, 07:19 PM
"Individual nations appear to be complying with the rules to various degrees. Privacy-obsessed Sweden is reportedly ignoring the rule completely, for example."

lol

HANZO
04-06-2009, 07:26 PM
for real none of this has even been in the news. they trying to do it without letting the public know about anything.

they very clever the stupid youth is too busy protesting globalisation and capitalism. i like how they jus sweep this shit under the radar so nobody knows.

Visionz
04-06-2009, 07:28 PM
for real none of this has even been in the news. they trying to do it without letting the public know about anything.

they very clever the stupid youth is too busy protesting globalisation and capitalism. i like how they jus sweep this shit under the radar so nobody knows.
they did the same thing with the patriot act after 9/11

Prolifical ENG
04-06-2009, 07:30 PM
IDK, these internet privacy articles always pop up for every country.

HANZO
04-06-2009, 07:32 PM
the ppl are easily distracted. the media like to pump us up about 'Global Problems', and praise the ppl for raising their voice on certain issues (economic crisis).

when it comes down to it, the real shit that effects our privacy and lives is forsaken by the media, and by the ppl.

jus shows how blind the ppl really are.

narc
04-06-2009, 07:53 PM
this is some CCP shit.

narc
04-06-2009, 07:57 PM
the ppl are easily distracted. the media like to pump us up about 'Global Problems', and praise the ppl for raising their voice on certain issues (economic crisis).

when it comes down to it, the real shit that effects our privacy and lives is forsaken by the media, and by the ppl.

jus shows how blind the ppl really are.

thats what im thinking, if anything im pissed off at the public, just sheep jumping at whatever the media tells them to

Ghost In The 'Lac
04-06-2009, 08:37 PM
just read the telegraph article, explains it all really. Basic civil liberties are being taken away RIGHT NOW frmo under our noses in the name of "national security and protection", they EXACT same words used by the Nazi's when they cut back civil rights.

And as for my question eariler about how they got the ISP;s to agree to this - THEY ARE BEING RE-IMBURSES FROM TAXPAYERS MONEY!

this is sickening, whats even more sickening is that 99.9999% of people arent even aware of it.

Whats evern more worse is that im not even sure most everyday people understand what the importance behind Civil Liberties is. Civil rights have been clouded over for years and years, slowly forcing people to forget why our grandparents faught in 2 world wars.

Internet records to be stored for a year

Details of every email sent and website visited by people in Britain are to be stored for use by the state from tomorrow as part of what campaigners claim is a massive assault on privacy.


By David Barrett, Home Affairs Correspondent
Last Updated: 3:20PM BST 05 Apr 2009




A European Union directive, which Britain was instrumental in devising, comes into force which will require all internet service providers to retain information on email traffic, visits to web sites and telephone calls made over the internet, for 12 months.
Police and the security services will be able to access the information to combat crime and terrorism.



Hundreds of public bodies and quangos, including local councils, will also be able to access the data to investigate flytipping and other less serious crimes.


It was previously thought that only the large companies would be required to take part, covering 95 per cent of Britain's internet usage, but a Home Office spokesman has confirmed it will be applied "across the board" to even the smallest company.


Privacy campaigners say the move to force telecoms companies to store the data is the first step towards the controversial central database at the heart of the Home Office's Intercept Modernisation Programme, which will gather far more detailed information on Britain's online activities.


Simon Davies, director of Privacy International, said: "I don't think people are aware of the implications of this move. It means that everything we do online or on the phone will be known to the authorities.


"They are using this to produce probably the world's most comprehensive surveillance system.


"This is a disgraceful example of the covert influence that Brussels has across our freedoms and liberties. The entire episode has been marked by a litany of secret dealings, vicious political games and a complete absence of transparency."


Phil Noble of privacy group NO2ID, said: "This is the kind of technology that the Stasi would have dreamed of.


"We are facing a co-ordinated strategy to track everyone's communications, creating a dossier on every person's relationships and transactions.


"It is clearly preparatory work for the as-yet un-revealed plans for intercept modernisation."


Another EU directive which requires companies to hold details of telephone records for a year has already come into force, and although internet data is held on an ad hoc basis this is the first time the industry has faced a statutory requirement to archive the material.


Information held includes the details of who contacted who, and when, but does not involve the content of emails being stored.


The taxpayer will reimburse internet service providers and telecoms companies for the costs associated with storing the billions of individual records.


Thierry Dieu of ETNO, the European telecoms networks operators association, said: "We regret that the legislation has been put through without real consultation with the players in the market.


"The UK is the only country which has decided to reimburse the cost of retaining all the data. It remains to be seen whether this will cover all the costs."


A Home Office spokesman said: "It is the Government's priority to protect

public safety and national security. That is why we are completing the implementation of this directive, which will bring the UK in line with our European counterparts.


"Letters will go out to communication service providers telling them that it is coming into force. We are talking across the board, to all communication providers."


He said communications data played a "vital part" in a wide range of criminal investigations, such as the hunt for the killer of Rhys Jones, the 11-year-old schoolboy shot dead in Liverpool in 2007, and the prevention of terrorists attacks.


"Without communications data, resolving crimes such as the Rhys Jones murder would be very difficult if not impossible.


"Access to communications data is governed by Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act which ensures that effective safeguards are in place and that the data can only be accessed when it is necessary and proportionate to do so," he said.


A European deal on storing data was first pursued by Charles Clarke when he was home secretary in 2005.


At the time, a Home Office spokesman confirmed that a major mobile phone company which had previously stored its data for just two days had agreed to retain the information for a year in exchange for 875,000 in taxpayers' money.


A report compiled by ETNO in 2004 said that a large internet service

provider would need to store between 20,000 and 40,000 terabytes of data - of the equivalent of 40 trillion emails - if it was required to keep all traffic data for 12 months.




That last part i underlined sound like it came straight from an old Nazi propanda flyer, go research and see for yourself.


The end is close, brethrens!!

narc
04-06-2009, 08:51 PM
"He said communications data played a "vital part" in a wide range of criminal investigations, such as the hunt for the killer of Rhys Jones, the 11-year-old schoolboy shot dead in Liverpool in 2007, and the prevention of terrorists attacks."

what kinda shit is that, now they sensationalising someones murder to make it look like a good idea?

PuNcH_iN_PuNcH_OuT
04-06-2009, 09:21 PM
better watch out for that jailbait porn then

EAGLE EYE
04-06-2009, 09:46 PM
I warned all you Euros this was coming roughly 6 months back. I even posted articles from Technology Liberation front and Techdirt but they all got ignored.



Sucks to be you guys though. I think the Swedes have it the worse right now. People getting stuffed and cuffed (at least the ones who contribute to pirate bay and other bootleg networks)

Olive Oil Goombah
04-06-2009, 10:45 PM
hahahah @ socialism...

Don't you people realize that socialists are just slicker communists???

The left is for Bigger government.

Most fascists started off as either socialists or communists...their ideals are more in tune with communism than anything, but the only reason conservatives back fascists is because its the lesser of two evils.


tsk tsk tsk

SKAMPOE
04-06-2009, 10:52 PM
Shits only gon get realah!

snapple
04-06-2009, 11:08 PM
i thought there always was internet police....