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Poetic Wun
06-26-2009, 01:49 AM
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01. Redemption (Feat. RZA)
02. Kill Too Hard (Feat. Inspectah Deck, U-God and Masta Ace)
03. The Abbot (Feat. RZA)
04. Harbor Masters (Feat. Ghostface Killah, AZ and Inspectah Deck)
05. Sheep State (Feat. RZA)
06. Radiant Jewels (Feat. Raekwon, Cormega and Sean Price)
07. Supreme Architecture (Feat. RZA)
08. Evil Deeds (Feat. Ghostface Killah, RZA and Havoc)
09. Wise Men (Feat. RZA)
10. I Wish You Were Here (Feat. Ghostface Killah and Tre Williams)
11. Fatal Hesitation
12. Ill Figures (Feat. Raekwon, MOP and Kool G Rap)
13. Free Like ODB (Feat. RZA)
14. Sound The Horns (Feat. Inspectah Deck, Sadat X and U-God)
15. Enlightened Statues (Feat. RZA)
16. NYC Crack (Feat. RZA)
17. One Last Question

Poetic Wun
06-26-2009, 02:22 AM
02. Kill Too Hard (Feat. Inspectah Deck, U-God and Masta Ace)
4/5- i dig this shit but the song is too short imo. Deck aint at his his best but he aint rhymin about bitches and shit he been rhymin bout lately. same goes for U. Masta came wit it.

04. Harbor Masters (Feat. Ghostface Killah, AZ and Inspectah Deck)
3.5/5- this was a good tack. Ghost was the only verse i could get down with tho.

06. Radiant Jewels (Feat. Raekwon, Cormega and Sean Price)
4/5- personally i thought Rae was out shone. but i expected it.

08. Evil Deeds (Feat. Ghostface Killah, RZA and Havoc)
4/5- love the beat. RZA & GHOST came with it. glad they opted for havoc instead of prodigy but i never been a fan. he did his thing.

10. I Wish You Were Here (Feat. Ghostface Killah and Tre Williams)
3/5- its Ghost doin his love shit... sounds aight, i'ma move on.

12. Ill Figures (Feat. Raekwon, MOP and Kool G Rap)
3/5- only cause i expected it to go harder w/ MOP G Rap. sounds aight for what it is. Rae took this lyrically but i over hyped this for me.

14. Sound The Horns (Feat. Inspectah Deck, Sadat X and U-God)
4/5- i dig the horns. Sadat was in there man, word up. this is what i wanted to hear.

16. NYC Crack (Feat. RZA)
4/5- its a RZA track. woulda sounded good on BOAP. it's a smooth joint.

everything else is RZA talking and his funky little 1min beats.
not a classic but they on point with this.
from the sound of this GZA & Masta woulda been nice to hear.
i'ma be rockin this no doubt. far from 8D and the Wu run this year just keeps getting nicer by the record.

Mista JpKoff
06-26-2009, 05:30 AM
After hearing the first two net-released tracks, Harbor Masters and Ill Figures, i didnt have high expectations. The songs were aight, but somewhat boring in a "Brooklyn King" way. Bass and rhythm were on point, but the whole stuff lacked energy and melodies. It turns out that they are the 2 weakest songs on there imo. The six other all have extra flavor.
Three tracks especially grabbed my attention : Sound The Horns with the nice bass, horns pattern and good verses from Deck and Sadat ; NYC Crack featuring the infamous Thea (sounding good on there though), one of the best beats, more complex with some guitar work and sound bits giving for a fuller sound... and dope lyrics by the rza bragging about his achievements compared to other rappers ; and Evil Deeds... on this one, revelations somehow manage to make the beat sound like a dope looped sample, adding some piano during the rza bridge, while ghost and rza murder the track.
The other three are all good songs. Raekwon gets schooled by Mega and Ruck on Radiant Jewels, which is a shame... he used to be better than these dudes back in the days!! Kill too hard is a showcase for U-God's style and Ace's lyrical technique while Deck gets the backseat (didnt Ace already spit that "i'ma be sitting at the table......" line somewhere else??) too bad the verses are so short. Finally the Al Green cover sounds real good, Ghost was the obvious pick for that stuff and he didnt fail. tre williams comes correct with the soul parts.

Kill too hard 4/5
Harbor masters 3.5/5
Radiant jewels 4/5
Evil deeds 4.5/5
I wish you were here 4/5
Ill figures 3/5
Sound the horns 4.5/5
NYC crack 4.5/5

Sultan Stringer
06-26-2009, 10:27 AM
damn, i love ill figures...

also to clarify, the producers on the album would find samples, and have the revelations recreate the entire sample in the studio, which the producers would than use to chop up and create the beat with. ill post the production credits when it stops raining cus the cd case is in my car

Mista JpKoff
06-26-2009, 10:38 AM
okay! thanks for the clarification man

claaa7
06-26-2009, 03:06 PM
01. Redemption - Nice opening with the Kung Fu samples and grittiness, even the Shaw Brothers signature theme opens the LP before giving us the classic Wu-Tang vibe with the beat and dialouge.

02. Hard to Kill - Which leads us to the hard drums and ill guitars The Revelations and RZA couples with a looped vocal sample; kicking off the LP with high quality. This shit is true fucking fire - EVERYBODY kills it, The Rebel drops a suprisingly dope verse while Uey bringing the DOPIUM we heard on his recent LP and "8 Diagrams" and Masta Ace, well Ace is just Ace so you know it's full of quotables.

03. Harbor Masters - Hell yeah, we all know this one by know. Love the heavy drums and the bass guitars and Ghostface once again proves why he is still the illest Wu member to this day; Deck is definitely aight on here but a bit below his verse on the previous cut. AZ definitely proves that he is a worthy replacement for Nas when it comes to that classic '90s Wu collaboration; A's flow is as nasty as ever and the verse is full of quotables. I like how all 3 of them has an individual hook that all fits nice with the joint.

04. Radiant Jewels - Oooooh shit, Raekwon drops fire over this bass-heavy string-incorporated beauty. Classic '90s rap in the '00s with Cormega, Sean Price and Rae all ripping the beat to shreds it to shreds but Corey comes off victorious on this one in my opinion.

05. Evil Deeds - Wow another future classic Wu banger, the piano-keys, bass and drums are all intact and we got Ghostface spitting flames while RZA flows dope over the beat; then put a verse from Havoc on there and you go right back in time to 1995. Production-wise I would say it sounds like a cross between early Wu and Mobb Deep while still keeping the formula updated. The Revelations and RZA really did a great job with the production and supervision of this album.

06. I Wish You Were Here - Another future classic; they just keep on coming on this album LOL. The song itself got a real smooth beautiful vibe to it and Ghostface verses is great filled with lots of emotions and Tre Williams has a real nice soulful voice, this is definitely the type of cuts i wanna hear on Ghost's RnB album later this year.

07. Fatal Hesitation - A dope instrumental intermission that doesn't feature RZA's preaching, instead we get a nasty Kung Fu flick dialouge sample like it was 1993 all over.

08. Ill Figures - Loved this one from the jump; Raekwon the Chef, M.O.P. and Kool G Rap is definitely 3 of my favorite rap acts and to hear them on a collaboration is just unbelivable. Production-wise it's another brilliant work and I love how Fame and Danze spit their verse as one 16 so it's almost sounds like it's only 3 rappers on the song. I definitely wouldn't mind this on OB4CL2.

09. Blow The Horns - Smooth beat, typical Wu-Tang sound with the repeated horn and slapping bass. You can hear that Deck is really feeling the production on this album cuz his spitting alot better than he's done in a long time, Sadat X swings by next and that's another collaboration I've been wanting for a long time (Brand Nubian/Wu-Tang); U-God closes with a ill DOPIUM verse.

10. NYC Crack - WHOA was my reaction when I first heard the beat kick in and the "watch ya step kid" sample from 36, the production is real triumphant and RZA shows why he is the abbot - sounding alot better than he's done in years, no Bobby Digital or 8 Diagrams bullshit just strictly NYC crack. This shit is such a dope closer that Thea isn't even bothering me at all and the Kung Fu samples at the end just wraps it up. "The Wu-Tang Slang is that New York City Crack" - a true statement in 2009 it seems.

11. Outro - Not much to say on this one really LOL.


Conclusion:
Production-wise, mixing, arranging and supervising is incredible from front to back. The Revelations and The RZA really made an album I never thought we'd see, it came out of nowhere it seems - and don't say RZA didn't was involved in the production of this album; he supervised and arranged "Chamber Music" the same way he did "Supreme Clientele" and the original "Bulletproof Wallets" with Ghostface and you can hear that this is his and the Wu-Tang's redemption for the weak critique most of their "recent" outputs have catched.
ALL the MC's and singers does a marvelous job too, and as some others i don't complain at all about the lenght of the LP at all, 35 minutes with such quality hip-hop is alot better than 25 minutes quality and 35 minutes average shit. Remember all the classics from back in the '80s that had 8-10 songs on them, well there you go. I might even go as far as saying this might be the illest thing to come out from the Wu camp since "The W" even, it shows us RZA knows what the fans really want and have been craving. Glad he used Raekwon, Ghostface, U-God, Deck and himself from the clan (except for Method Man which i wish was on the LP cuz he can still rip a track to shreds; maybe a Ghost/Mef/Das EFX collabo or something) but nice to not hear no sleepy GZA, Masta Killa or Cappa on here (though all 3 of them very rarely puts out a dope verse once in a while these days). But with the production bringing it back to the '90s and the early Wu-Tang sound (with a live band nontheless), I love all of the other NYC legends that appears like MOP, Sadat X, Cormega, Havoc, Sean Price.
My only complaint is a few of the skits which seems pretty pointless (they should not be listed as tracks, just appear at the end of previous song or instead add just one more track (maybe a Red & Meth collabo with Q-Tip or something).
Damn i just heard this album today and i already bumped it 4-5 times straight through. Haven't been able to hear more than the singles cuz i was busted and shit recently and might even see some jailtime soon but at least this and some hard drugs put some light on my day.



PRODUCTION: 9/10
LYRICS: 8.5/10
OVERALL: 9/10

Sultan Stringer
06-26-2009, 03:50 PM
nice review, my bad on being late with the credits... and only gettin half of them, i had scanned them the other day so i only have half. ill post the rest later

01 Redemption
Produced by the Revelations, Bob Perry & Noah Rubin

02 Kill Too Hard
Produced by Gintas Junusonis & Fizzy Womack

03 The Abbot
Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin

04 Harbor Masters
Prod. - Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack

05 Sheep State
Prod - The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin

06 Radiant Jewels
Prod - Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack

07 Supreme Architecture
Prod - The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin

08 Evil Deeds
Prod - Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack

09 Wise Men
Produced by the revelations, bob perry, and noah rubin

10 I Wish You Were Here
Written by willie mitchell(irving music inc./BMI)
Produced by bob perry & fizzy womack

11 Fatal Hesitation
produced by the revelations, bob perry, and noah rubin

12 ILL Figures
produced by Fizzy Womack & Josh Werner
All instruments by Josh Werner

13 Free Like ODB
produced by the revelations, bob perry, & noah rubin

14 Sound The Horns
Produced by andrew kelley, noah rubin, fizzy womack, gintas janusonis & josh werner
horns by Jay Rodriguez & Fabio Morgera

15 Enlightened Statues
produced by the revelations, bob perry & noah rubin

16 NYC Crack
produced by Rza with Fizzy Womack & Andrew Kelley, Additional guitars by josh werner, additional keyboards by RZA, hook vocals by thea van seijen

17 One Last Question
produced by noah rubin

Exec producer - RZA
Project A&R - Bob Perry with Andrew Kelley & Fizzy Womack
All Music by : The revelations
Wes Mingus : Guitar
Borahm Lee: Keyboards
Josh Werner : Bass
Gintas Janusonis : Drums

Recorded and mixed by : Noah Rubin & Arnold Mischkulnig
Mastered by : Arnold Mischkulnig
Assistant Engineer: Jeff Rameau
Creative Direction : Paul Grosso
Art Direction & Design : Andrew Kelley

from my understanding, the production credits is ordered by involvement. but i could be wrong. they were all pretty much in the studio every night for weeks straight, crankin out bangers.

claaa7
06-26-2009, 05:12 PM
^^ nice thx for that, very interesting to see that Lil' Fame is one of the producers for every song on there (except skits). Fizzy Wommack + live instrumentation + RZA supervision = unbetabable.. post the rest later man. thx

Sultan Stringer
06-26-2009, 07:38 PM
i put the credits up

claaa7
06-27-2009, 12:30 PM
01 Redemption
Produced by the Revelations, Bob Perry & Noah Rubin

02 Kill Too Hard
Produced by Gintas Junusonis & Fizzy Womack

03 The Abbot
Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin

04 Harbor Masters
Prod. - Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack

05 Sheep State
Prod - The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin

06 Radiant Jewels
Prod - Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack

07 Supreme Architecture
Prod - The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin

08 Evil Deeds
Prod - Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack

09 Wise Men
Produced by the revelations, bob perry, and noah rubin

10 I Wish You Were Here
Written by willie mitchell(irving music inc./BMI)
Produced by bob perry & fizzy womack

11 Fatal Hesitation
produced by the revelations, bob perry, and noah rubin

12 ILL Figures
produced by Fizzy Womack & Josh Werner
All instruments by Josh Werner

13 Free Like ODB
produced by the revelations, bob perry, & noah rubin

14 Sound The Horns
Produced by andrew kelley, noah rubin, fizzy womack, gintas janusonis & josh werner
horns by Jay Rodriguez & Fabio Morgera

15 Enlightened Statues
produced by the revelations, bob perry & noah rubin

16 NYC Crack
produced by Rza with Fizzy Womack & Andrew Kelley, Additional guitars by josh werner, additional keyboards by RZA, hook vocals by thea van seijen

17 One Last Question
produced by noah rubin

Exec producer - RZA
Project A&R - Bob Perry with Andrew Kelley & Fizzy Womack
All Music by : The revelations
Wes Mingus : Guitar
Borahm Lee: Keyboards
Josh Werner : Bass
Gintas Janusonis : Drums

Recorded and mixed by : Noah Rubin & Arnold Mischkulnig
Mastered by : Arnold Mischkulnig
Assistant Engineer: Jeff Rameau
Creative Direction : Paul Grosso
Art Direction & Design : Andrew Kelley

from my understanding, the production credits is ordered by involvement. but i could be wrong, i do know that Evil Deeds and Radient Jewels were mostly produced by Andrew Kelley, with help from by Fizzy and Noah. Although he only helped with Harbor Masters and A&R'd it, but his name is listed first... they were all pretty much in the studio every night for weeks straight, crankin out bangers.

thx alot, very interesting.. wow they were a whole team up in the studio. imagine all these musicians up there with RZA and Lil' Fame basically sleeping in the studio and Deck, Ace, Sadat X, Ghost, Uey, Rae and Cormega, AZ, Havoc showing up spitting flames. The original ad said it would feature Killah Priest and Cappadonna amongst others though so i guess they didn't show up in time (say with the rest of the wu members). but anyways this shit is the best of 2009 yet.. i bet MOP's coming will be 2nd.

Sultan Stringer
06-27-2009, 01:09 PM
thx alot, very interesting.. wow they were a whole team up in the studio. imagine all these musicians up there with RZA and Lil' Fame basically sleeping in the studio and Deck, Ace, Sadat X, Ghost, Uey, Rae and Cormega, AZ, Havoc showing up spitting flames. The original ad said it would feature Killah Priest and Cappadonna amongst others though so i guess they didn't show up in time (say with the rest of the wu members). but anyways this shit is the best of 2009 yet.. i bet MOP's coming will be 2nd.

lil fame is so underrated as a 'musician'... its not even funny. he straight up breathes hip hop

keelay
06-27-2009, 03:13 PM
u can tell that everyone involved are huge wu-tang fans. some of the lineups on the songs are like something you would dream up and wish would happen, Rae/MOP/Kool G Rap?? Deck/SadatX/U-god?? Rae/Cormega/SeanPrice(ruck from heltah skeltah, bcc)?? Ghost/Rza/Havoc?? Deck/MastaAce/Ugod? Ghost/AZ/Deck? its like the yankees buyin up the best talent or some shit, tryin to get rings, ballin, doin P-Diddy dances on peoples faces.

that bob perry dude did hiphop a huge favor. Hopefully this does some numbers, and we can see MORE of this, not only from wu, but from a lot of these dudes from the 90s.

cant remember the last time the graphic designer was producing dope records as well as making an extremely dope cover art and booklet.

01. Redemption

Extremely dope intro to the album, cant really rate it outta 5 cus its an intro, but it sets the tone for the album.... i love kung fu samples...

02. Kill Too Hard (featuring Inspectah Deck, U-God & Masta Ace)

some energy, dope beat, i like masta ace rappin alongside these dudes. he has been spitting flames since the 80s and nothing has changed. deck rappin about bein rich but also robbin people shit and rollin around in fatigues and holdin a heater. u-god demandin respect, def a dope U verse. Masta kills this shit. but not my fav track on the album so its like a 4.7/5

dopest line? "Labels stay messin with a cats future/ and that weighs on me heavy like rasputia", had to google rasputia hahaha i guess thats this fat chick from the movie norbit.

runner up - "Its your boy ace, Bk's own/ all you ringtone rap dudes please stay home"


03. The Abbott
interlude... the beat starts getting real weird and spooky towards the end... this coulda used some kung fu samples on it haha but whatever its an interlude

04. Harbor Masters (featuring Ghostface Killah, AZ & Inspectah Deck)

ghost kills it, deck kills it, AZ kills it 4.7/5

ghost - "cus of that? im gonna rock the show tonight/The twat team gonna get some hoes tonight"...twat team has to be one of the more ridiculous terms ive ever heard

the fact that these dudes spit similar but different choruses, each individually, is pretty dope, and brings a little bit of their personality out subtly, and i can dig that

i dont get why some people dont like this deck verse, i know he has the potential to go on some other worldly shit, but he rips this shit and theres too many quotables i cant even get into that

05. Sheep State
weird interlude... rza droppin knowledge


06. Radiant Jewels (featuring Raekwon, Cormega & Sean Price)

ughhh this shit is just so gully, rae kills it. mega digs it up, murders it again, and than sean price pisses on the remains...

dopest line - "FUCK A FLOW/ THIS IS THE LYRICAL AQUADUCT" "if im getting too deep ill give you a minute to take it in"

sean price verse sounds like he slapped some people on the way to the studio.

dopest line pt 2 "aint a problem the god cant handle/ i set it off 'First, Blood'/ sean jean Rambo" whoooooooooo, First Blood is the name of the first rambo movie... thats some clever shit

4.99/5

07. Supreme Architecture

another interlude... rza talkin about mathematics and equations, human error... pretty cool i guess

08. Evil Deeds (featuring Ghostface Killah, RZA & Havoc)

hands down the dopest record on the album, Ghost and RZA rappin together again, okay.

rza over the piano beat breakdown with the chorus is the best ive heard him in a while

"My Moms Put gun powder inside my similac", "I got more Gz than sicily"...

havoc on some sinister murder shit, the twitter line is hysterical

i love how the chorus kicks in again after havoc, the kung fu sample at the end is dope

5/5

09. Wise Men

rza on keepin smart people around u...another interlude

10. I Wish You Were Here (featuring Ghostface Killah & Tre
Williams)

4.999/5... can we get an entire album of ghostface and tre williams doin al green covers? i mean holy shit this is such a dope song... Soul > RNB... definitely gonna cop a revelations cd, on the strenf of Tre killlllin it, he outshines ghost on this, and ghost's verse is ridiculous.


11. Fatal Hesitation

dopest interlude on the album

12. Ill Figures (featuring Raekwon, M.O.P. & Kool G Rap)

5/5, a good set of speakers is a must for this bass line, this song beats the shit out of my house/whip...

"reefer lit, love hiphop, the gangsters got me like the broccoli, brooklyn baby coolin at a swap meet, real niggaz wanna meet me, ladies wanna eat me, money cream mercedes clean baby, beat me, love gettin dressed up, sweats and tecs, ride around the hood gettin gotti respect" is it 1995?

MOP rappin back n forth... swords and shit goin off in the chorus

alright, Kool G Rap murders the album with his verse... what the fuck... why did it take so long for this collaboration... i want a Rae MOP and Kool G Rap album

13. Free Like ODB
RIP ODB

14. Sound The Horns (featuring Inspectah Deck, Sadat X & U-God)

4.89/5...

deck's verse opens it up nicely, and do i hear a C thomas Howell reference?

'we storm through like c thomas, red dawn'

so fucking awesome, i love that fucking movie.

Sadat X keeps it so gully

that sadat x verse is so gangster, i mean cmon '16 bars keep the car runnin', its like he doesnt give a fuck about no fame or glory, just spittin rhymes to get his transmission fixed or some shit.

U-God, spittin some dopium, as usual. i was never a huge u-god fan... but this shit is dopium and im gonna hafta cop that dopium now, ya dig?

15. Enlightened Statues

pretty cool interlude... reminds me of a field after a battle, with the wounded everywhere, with rza floating down like jesus on some golden chariot, comin through with some water, like Ben Hur, before he then completely rips it on NYC crack...


16. NYC Crack (featuring RZA)

RZA on some crazy cocky shit, i fuckin love it. thea sounds real dope on the chorus

everything rza says on this is amazing. i cant pull 1 quote cus its all fuckin awesome

THAT WUTANG SLANG IS THAT NEW YORK CITY CRACK

17. One Last Question
haha, what the fuck?


at first i was like "Ehhh cmon, 8 songs, 8 interludes? what the fuck", after rollin up a dub of fire and listening to this 5 times in a row, i am no longer disappointed. the best comparison to this shit is if ur about to fuck a girl, and u just get the tip in, and than the fat friend runs in and cock blocks... like "god damn that was good, but now i wanna get balls deep"... where the fuck is pt 2? pt 3? pt 40? but this shit stands on its own even if there aint no more comin, so even if i cant get 'balls deep' with pt 2 3 and 4, i can 'whack off' and take my favorite songs off 8diagrams and put all these songs on that, and some of the dope interludes and the intro...

overall : 5/5, lyrics : 5/5, length - 8/10, if there was even 1 more song this shit would have been 1 of the greatest cds ever

Krusha
06-27-2009, 03:17 PM
When was this released?

Sultan Stringer
06-27-2009, 03:36 PM
When was this released?

its coming out on tuesday. u can preview it at myspace.com/rza or find a bootleg. but this shit is definitely a banger so grab it on tuesday. the artwork alone is worth a spot in ur glove box

Krusha
06-27-2009, 04:15 PM
Aight man! got to get it!

racist randy
06-27-2009, 06:41 PM
I'm glad this isn't a Wu-Tang album.

Dr. Simon Hurt
06-27-2009, 07:28 PM
i voted average---no replay value, lack of cohesion between the features, rza's chorus fucking up evil deeds...and there's only 25 minutes of actual songs here but 'we've ran through that chamber'

and this doesn't take it back to the old wu sound at all, i wish they would stop even trying to promote shit on that basis, the closest was the w and people shitted on that, when that's probably one of the rawest (and best) albums in the whole wu catalog...anyway....

nyc crack is the shit though, that's the only track i see myself playing in the future

and some of the dickriding in here is hilarious to me, so...if you had a 60 minute album with 25-35 minutes of good tracks, you would rate that album average or subpar right? so why is this shit supposed to be exceptional.

it sounds like a rush job to me, it's just overall one of those things where the tracks sound good on first listen but they lose their luster quickly.

keepers: ill figures, evil deeds (rza's chorus is so lame though), radiant jewels (gunshots are so fucking played out in hiphop songs, shit's embarassing), nyc crack (thea actually sounded alright here, the track had a portishead vibe)

8 diagrams>>>>>>>wu tang meets indie culture>>>chamber music

oh and on the issue of the album length, you guys disappoint me. no one, absolutely no one, said 'Half short and twice strong'. Sad.

racist randy
06-27-2009, 09:25 PM
i voted average---no replay value, lack of cohesion between the features, rza's chorus fucking up evil deeds...and there's only 25 minutes of actual songs here but 'we've ran through that chamber'

and this doesn't take it back to the old wu sound at all, i wish they would stop even trying to promote shit on that basis, the closest was the w and people shitted on that, when that's probably one of the rawest (and best) albums in the whole wu catalog...anyway....



Agreed.

LiveFast
06-28-2009, 01:12 AM
wu tang meets indie culture>>>chamber music

I don't know dude... You continue to launch criticisms at this project because you feel it lacks enough content, but you gave Wu Meets Indie 8.5/10 rating. You do realize that album had only 4 Wu verses out NINETEEN freaking songs, and no Ghost, no Raekwon, no Deck, no Meth, no MK... Why wasn't that a rush job? Shouldn't Think Differently have held the album in the can until all Wu members had come on board?

Would you have given Chamber Music a better rating if they didn't do the interludes with RZA and instead filled the album up with a bunch songs by minor league rappers with NO actual Clan members on them?

The reality here is that you think that the label's marketing has been deceptive and doesn't match the final product and that's effecting your judgement of the musical content. I think if you had never seen that koch flyer (which I agree is totally misrepresentative), your opinion on this CD might have been a lot less critical.


One more thing, do you think gunshots in gangsta movies are played out too? I mean c'mon, the song is on some gangsta shit...

Dr. Simon Hurt
06-28-2009, 08:48 AM
the beat actually stops for the gunshot sound effects, it fucks up the flow of the song, we're talking about songs not movies...you can't deny that's overdone.

wu tang meets indie culture at least had fully formed songs, some of which had actual concepts to them, the album had much more cohesion imo; yes it was lacking in wu-tang mcs, but it also had affiliated artists on there as well. it wasn't without flaws, but for me it was definitely a more complete album.

and yes, while i feel their advertising was deceptive, that doesn't change the fact that we have 8 short songs here with 9 interludes/intros/filler, which even if i came to this with no preconceptions would piss me off. the album is lacking substance imo, alot of the people rating it so highly won't have any use for it in 2-3 weeks I guarantee it.

Senator C. Palantine
06-28-2009, 08:54 AM
Album is ok.

Well too short.

4 or 5 dope tracks.

overall its average.

keelay
06-28-2009, 10:28 AM
Its good to hear the other side of the pond in terms of love or hate. Vay, you are in the minority. I know you know that, thats why you write paragraphs in response of the album, trying to get the masses to agree with you. Problem is, you are in the minority. I respect your opinion, but realize, you are in the minority.

Dr. Simon Hurt
06-28-2009, 11:50 AM
^^^what's your point? that i should conform to the popular opinion? i write paragraphs because i'm actually capable of explaining my opinion, which is an underrated trait. you wrote 'you are in the minority' 3 times like that means anything.

keelay
06-28-2009, 01:06 PM
^^^what's your point? that i should conform to the popular opinion? i write paragraphs because i'm actually capable of explaining my opinion, which is an underrated trait. you wrote 'you are in the minority' 3 times like that means anything.

no its ok to go against the grain, i do all the time. im a going against the grain poster boy. but its like you are on a mission to shit on this CD i dont get it. the reason for me saying "youre in the minority" multiple times is because you feel the need to rehash your opinion on every single chamber music thread like you are going to convert the masses. its almost like a vendetta. i wouldnt normally waste my time with people like you, but its to that point.

Dr. Simon Hurt
06-28-2009, 02:36 PM
^^^um, this is the review thread...i gave my review lol i swear people get personally offended when you're critical of something they enjoy. oh and that 'you're in the minority' bullshit...that may be...on this forum...where alot of people love anything wu without reservation or hesistation. if you go to other forums alot of people have the same complaints that i do. also, you don't even have 30 posts yet and i bet 1/2 of them are responding to me lol i normally wouldn't waste my time responding to someone like you, but it's like you have a vendetta against me lol

claaa7
06-29-2009, 09:49 AM
i ain't no fucking dickrider, but chamber music is easily a 4/5... same as 8 Diagrams, the only really mediocre group LP they done was "Iron Flag", but the majority of solo releases since "Supreme Clientele" has been average. "No Said Date" that gets so much praise is 7.5/10 for me, "Dopium" is probably a 7 then - gotta listen to that more though and through speakers (same with CM) and BO2 is 7.5/10 (yes, i said it - same as No Said Date).

Cappadonna36
06-30-2009, 10:54 AM
just copped the album...

gonna give it a good listen here @ work.

so far im loving the Shaw Brothers intro. surprised no one has mentioned that

Cappadonna36
06-30-2009, 11:37 AM
smh @ RZA sneaking Thea on NYC CRACK.

Unicron the Agitator
06-30-2009, 11:58 AM
I won't bitch about the length of the album but will focus on the actual songs. There are 8 solid, if not outstanding tracks on this album and in this day and age of pre-packaged, fast food hip-hop to get 8 good songs on an album is an accomplishment. I thought there was cohesion with the RZA's intros blending almost seamlessly into the actual songs. The production is great, and the Revolutions do a fantastic job playing the samples, especially on "I Wish You Were Here." I will give it a 4/5 because I have listened to it about three times and I only bought it about an hour ago.

Don Universo
06-30-2009, 12:46 PM
i ain't no fucking dickrider, but chamber music is easily a 4/5... same as 8 Diagrams, the only really mediocre group LP they done was "Iron Flag", but the majority of solo releases since "Supreme Clientele" has been average. "No Said Date" that gets so much praise is 7.5/10 for me, "Dopium" is probably a 7 then - gotta listen to that more though and through speakers (same with CM) and BO2 is 7.5/10 (yes, i said it - same as No Said Date).

Sorry but I'm gonna keep sayin it...Iron flag was a better album than the W and 8d...that being said I'm gonna cop this chamber music album after work, light one up and crack a ballantine. i'll review later.

DrBold241
06-30-2009, 01:37 PM
great tracks on there, and the revelations did an amazing job with the sound of the record.
but it's far too short.
full clan isn't even on there, not a true WTC record.
More like RZA featuring....
either way i say banger as a minimum. i'd give it a higher rating if it had the whole clan and less filler.

beautifulrock
06-30-2009, 02:13 PM
Wu-Tang Chamber Music : Bringing it Back to the Heyday

If this were 1978, nobody would care that this were an 8 track, skit laden album at just over 36 minutes in length. Unfortunately for RZA and the Clan, the music consumers of this world have been spoiled by 16 track opuses with 3 hot tracks and a tedious array of filler tracks that should have been left on the cutting room floor. The consumers demand more, and if they don't get it, they are quick to point it out as a flaw of some sort. And if that is the biggest complaint that accompanies this album, as it seems to be, those true fans of Wu-Tang that allow this music to sink in, will be greatly rewarded for what this album isn't. This album isn't bad in any way. It isn't a rehash of any kind. Scrapped are the samples of old, replaced by a novel concept in hip hop, original music! Played by live band! But don't recoil in horror yet, 8 Diagrams haters, that experimental RZA sound is gone and he brings it back to the essence, truly harnessing the nineties Wu-Tang sound.
RZA says this is not a Wu-Tang album, that it can't be a Wu-Tang album without the whole clan, and Method Man, GZA, and Masta Killa are absent on this. To offset this absence, RZA gathers some of the nineties greatest lyricists as guest spots. Verses submitted by Masta Ace, AZ, Cormega, Sean Price (Heltah Skeltah), MOP, Kool G Rap, and Sadat X (Bran Nubian) make the music sound even more nostalgically nineties. Live band The Revelations create a soulful musical backdrop, even on the skits, their presence provides a seamless transition from song to song, giving the whole album fluidity. On those skits which some will find annoying, RZA appears to be preaching at first glance, but if you really dissect what he's saying, he's sending out messages to the clan as well as describing himself and his spirituality to you, the fans. He's letting you know what makes him tick, and that's a side you really don't get from a lot of these elusive artists.
With a short run time and many, many skits, you would think this album would have little or no replay value, but it does. The verses are utterly repeatable, the knowledge dropped is thought provoking, and it's a very easy listen. None of the 8 songs is below a banger (4/5), even the Ghost single-verse track "I Wish You Were Here" provides an excellent vocal performance by Tre Williams, even if the crusty Wu-Stans don't appreciate it. (Go cry to your blaugs (http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=blaug)) So, it's not a Wu-Tang album, but really, it is. (Don't tell RZA)






Redemption: Definitely a subliminal message, RZA is saying he feels disgraced and wants to redeem the clan. It's really clever, like he's telling the story of the 8 Diagrams fiasco.

Kill Too Hard

With a Gregorian chant and blues keyboard in the background and a simple drum beat driving this song with no hook, the onus is on Inspectah Deck, U-God, and guest Masta Ace to do all the heavy lifting on the verses and they do so admirably. Deck and Uey are in fine form.

4 out of 5


The Abbot: RZA explaining the significance of the abbot over eerie strings and stick percussion, is his message that he is training a replacement? Only time will tell.

Harbor Masters

RZA finds a beat explicitly suited for Ghostface, INS, and AZ. They all sound at home over an early eighties detective show style percussion and reverberating funk guitar. Each artist spins their own version of the hook, a definite plus in giving the song replay value.

4 out of 5


Sheep State: RZA explains his interpretation of the 85%

Radiant Jewels

The first sure fire classic on the album, with synthetic looping strings driving a head nodding beat, and Cormega in particular spitting a memorable verse. This chamber captures the New York Hip Hop element more than any other in recent history.

5 out of 5

Supreme Architecture: RZA explaining Supreme Architecture and how he feels like a Supreme Architect using music as a conduit. The next song is absolutely an example of Supreme Architecture.

Evil Deeds

Possibly could have been the best thing to come out of the Wu-Camp in a decade, if not for Havoc's completely irrelevant verse that doesn't seem to belong after RZA's poignant words. A harmony composed of repeating slamming piano notes and an orchestrated grand piano break on the hook make this an addictive thriller. Even Havoc can't ruin that.

5 out of 5


Wise Men: This is a tough skit to comprehend because it seems to be composed of several incomplete thoughts. In the beginning he's talking about an easier path to heaven, then he talks about igniting the spark, a repeated thought, then he talks about the sun. So who knows. Maybe Ghostlaced will do a thread about it.

Wish You Were Here

A sad tale of woe and loss, Ghost fits perfectly with his vivid storytelling rap, and Tre Williams shines vocally for the two and a half minutes he's allowed to shine. Kind of a strange song structure wise but none the less a triumph for R+B/Rap crossover fans.

4 out of 5


Fatal Hesitation: This Kung-Fu sample is perhaps a warning, RZA seems to be sending out lots of subconscious messages

Ill Figures

A bass filled soundscape envelops this gritty city track. Raekwon intros and leads off again with Mash Out Posse and Kool G Rap in tow. The energy is all over the place of course with Raekwon and Kool G Rap being understated as usual, and MOP being their loud flamboyant selves.

4 out of 5


Free Like ODB: Although on the surface RZA talks about the body being empty in a physical sense, when he mentions ODB, you can sense a metaphorical emptiness when he speaks about his fallen brother, perhaps the intention.

Sound the Horns

Listeners who aren't familiar with Bran Nubian, may be turned off to Sadat X's vocals and eclectic flow. Personally, I think it was a superb choice to go over such a sound that is uniquely Wu. Blaring horns, and low plucking bass guitar, give it the slightly spaghetti western feel that Sadat X has dominated in the past. We already know Deck kills this type of beat (see Vendetta), and when you add U-God's newer more polished flow, the result is nothing short of a masterpiece. This is the best track on the album in my mind.

5 out of 5

Enlightened Statues: This skit brings everything RZA's saying together. Life is a spiritual journey that culminates with "the light" and how you live your life, the excesses you take, determine the length of ones life. Everybody lives their life a different way. The "drunken buddha" is representative of Old Dirty Bastard, who quite obviously lived his life to excessive extremes and reached the light faster than his counterparts. It's a message that reaches out not only to his brothers, but to everybody, and it's a message that time is running out and the Clan need to recreate the Supreme Architecture of the past, and reignite the spark, before it's too late.

NYC Crack

Elements from throughout the entire career of Wu-Tang Clan impresario RZA are represented here, from the "watch ya step kid" voice samples of the 36 chamber days, to the rolling Wu-Tang Forever percussion, to the Kill Bill western strings, and last to Thea (Digi Snacks) finally pulling off her Billie Holiday impersonation on the hook. There are numerous subconscious tricks used here, think stuttering keyboard synth string strikes from Marvel and intermittent electric guitar chords from Unpredictable, but much softer. He takes himself back to his essence, spitting rhymes loaded with references ripped from his days as a child propped in front of the television. RZA is a genius, and he knows it, and he's certainly not afraid to show it.

5 out of 5


RZA ends the album calling himself the "universal buddha", and really he isn't far off. This album tells a story in a way similar to a campfire yarn. It is both entertaining and informative, a cautionary tale as well as a plea. RZA wants the clan back, and he wants it bad, but isn't completely filtered as far as his displeasure with the events of a year and a half ago. This album is theater, great inside drama exposed. Sure if you take RZA at his word, this isn't a Wu-Tang album. It's a personal message from RZA to the world and his brothers. You are all invited.

36-2 (excessive skits, short length)

=34/40

4.25 out of 5

Suga Duga
06-30-2009, 02:19 PM
radiant jewels is my fav. good review rock.

Sultan Stringer
06-30-2009, 05:34 PM
good review

Ghost In The 'Lac
06-30-2009, 06:05 PM
Evil Deeds

Possibly could have been the best thing to come out of the Wu-Camp in a decade, if not for Havoc's completely irrelevant verse that doesn't seem to belong after RZA's poignant words.



the fuck you talking about?
RZA verse was all about killing niggaz and guns, all 3 verses were along the same lines, Hav's verse fitted into the rest of the song tight
i dont see your "rza's poingnant words". your just spewing more random hatred because you dont like Havoc.
you talk out your ass, fool. Hav melted. end of discussion.

just stop listening

beautifulrock
06-30-2009, 06:12 PM
the fuck you talking about?
RZA verse was all about killing niggaz and guns, all 3 verses were along the same lines, Hav's verse fitted into the rest of the song tight
i dont see your "rza's poingnant words". your just spewing more random hatred because you dont like Havoc.
you talk out your ass, fool. Hav melted. end of discussion.

just stop listening
Awww you're just a little upset because I called you out. You should thank me for mentioning your name at all.




































and RZA can talk about killin' niggaz and guns poignantly because he's RZA















and Mobb Deep sucks.

Cappadonna36
06-30-2009, 08:10 PM
mobb deep sucks?!

my dude, you are bugging

Sultan Stringer
06-30-2009, 11:01 PM
im gonna go ahead and disagree, and say mobb deep is dope.

beautifulrock
06-30-2009, 11:03 PM
I just said that to get Lacey all riled up, don't burn me in effigy.

SKAMPOE
06-30-2009, 11:14 PM
at first i was like "Ehhh cmon, 8 songs, 8 interludes? what the fuck", after rollin up a dub of fire and listening to this 5 times in a row, i am no longer disappointed.
co sign:b

Ghost In The 'Lac
07-01-2009, 06:41 AM
I just said that to get Lacey all riled up, don't burn me in effigy.

no you didnt, youve said that many times in the past.

Your a faggot, and your bum ass opinions have been voided for time.

Don Universo
07-01-2009, 09:32 AM
Superior album....9.5/10
This album is basically takin shots at todays mainstream emcees and I love every bit of it. From intro to outro nothin but great material. Rae and Ghost spit fire, Deck and Ugod come correct.

Radiant Jewels, Ill Figures, NYC Crack...illest joints on the album
Kill to hard, Harbour masters, Evil deeds...straight heat
Sound the horns...great sleeper joint.

This album didn't need the other Wu members IMO...everybody came correct.

Fright
07-01-2009, 11:16 AM
fuck NYC Crack.Thea ruins the whole song.

beautifulrock
07-01-2009, 11:36 AM
no you didnt, youve said that many times in the past.

Your a faggot, and your bum ass opinions have been voided for time.haaahahahahahahhahh, see? fired up.

staycreepin_n_silence
07-02-2009, 01:28 AM
it's good over hyped give it one year it the standard normal distribution will shift

-The A to the Z-
07-02-2009, 05:55 AM
My only real problem is that the 2 weakest beats in my opinion - Harbo[u]r Masters and Ill Figures - are on the longest songs.

I'll rate it within a week, it needs a few more listens before judgement.

Sultan Stringer
07-02-2009, 06:33 AM
My only real problem is that the 2 weakest beats in my opinion - Harbo[u]r Masters and Ill Figures - are on the longest songs.

I'll rate it within a week, it needs a few more listens before judgement.

u listening to Ill Figures with a subwoofer?

Sultan Stringer
07-02-2009, 11:42 AM
http://www.hiphopdx.com/index/reviews/id.1209/title.wu-tang-clan-chamber-music

Since 2000’s The W, the Wu-Tang Clan has descended from the fiercest emcee collective in history, to a group using its brand above skills to move albums from shelves. Whereas Iron Flag [click to read] took a dark, radio-defying turn, 8 Diagrams [click to read] lacked the sincerity and quality expected from a six year hiatus. Perhaps the biggest surprise yet at 2009’s halfway point, Wu-Tang Chamber Music comes not as true group effort (Masta Killa, GZA and Method Man have no involvement), but a RZA-helmed project with influential ‘80s and ‘90s emcees on the side, that is easily the best collective offering in nine or more years.

“Ill Figures” [click to listen] is an outstanding example of ‘90s New York lyricism. Paired with Kool G Rap [click to read], one can hear side-by-side a primary source in Raekwon’s [click to read] knack for cadence and slang. M.O.P. separates the mellow wordplay with anger and angst, as to be expected from Brownsville’s finest. “Kill Too Hard” is as upbeat as Wu ever gets, with Inspectah Deck [click to read] tearing through the live percussion with his superb timing and syncopated delivery that made the first and second renditions of “Protect Ya Neck” so lively. U-God [click to read] comes close behind, arguably having a career year, as demonstrated in his just-released Dopium effort [click to read], also boasting throwback deliveries. Another Juice Crew alum, this time Masta Ace [click to read] appears on the track, benefiting from the rugged company, and sounding more threatening than he has since he ripped High & Mighty a new one in 2001 on “Acknowledge.” These guest appearances break the inner circle traditionally impermeable on Wu releases, and from Sadat X [click to read] to AZ [click to read] to Havoc [click to read], all guests seemed to bring this project brutal reminders that the ‘90s rhyme-ethic never left.

Beyond simply cool collaborations, it is a lot of personal attention that separated this work apart from Think Differently, Ghost Dog soundtrack, or other honest, but ultimately lukewarm Wu-Tang Music Group releases. Eerie interludes, crafted by the RZA with vocal samples and monologue mortar the songs nicely. These jewels help make this compilation feel like an album, and build towards the songs, a formula employed on the epic classic Enter The 36 Chambers 15 years ago. RZA also dusted off the rhyme book, and graces “NYC Crack” with a nostalgic entrance, and the kind of uncensored verse that returns the "Abbot" to New York subject matter, back from Hollywood hiatus.

The primary upgrade on this project versus 8 Diagrams or Iron Flag is production. Although he shares duties with RZA, Fizzy Womack – better known as M.O.P.’s Lil Fame deserves huge recognition for his co-production on seven of the album’s finest records. Repeatedly joined by Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin and longtime Koch record exec Bob Perry, it’s truly unclear who is doing what. Still, the percussion elements are very much in the vein of the same sample kits RZA was employing on the early ‘90s archetypal Wu material. Additionally, The Revelations, a ‘70s-sounding Funk outfit give the brass and keys necessary to save on sample budgets altogether. A bit cleaner than RZA, the sound is most comparable to 1993’s “Wu-Tang: 7th Chamber, Pt. 2.” Whether First Family, Revelations, or RZA on the track, this is a consistent Wu-Tang sound, belonging to one unit of producers – something that often felt lost in the a la carte duties of True Master and Mathematics in the last decade.

Wu-Tang Chamber Music is a lot deeper than a low-budget olive branch between the Brothers Wu and their onetime peers. Instead, this may indeed be the group’s life-blood, and formula to appease the loyal fans searching for both evolution and integrity. The Wu has never sounded so connected to their roots in Hip Hop and roots within themselves, for one of the sweetest surprises of this year.

Dr. Simon Hurt
07-02-2009, 11:52 AM
http://vinylmeltdown.com/2009/06/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/

Garnering much speculation when it was first announced, Chamber Music made heads everywhere wonder if Wu-tang was releasing another full length album so soon after their substandard 2007 drop, 8 Diagrams. Others speculated that Chamber Music would merely be a collection of b-sides and recycled verses. Where the album actually falls is somewhere in between these two conjectures. Not quite a studio album, not quite a mixtape, Chamber Music is a compilation album masterminded by RZA which features a good spread of Wu-Tang MCs alongside renown hip hop artists over beats formulated by soul band The Revelations in conjunction with the RZA himself.

If a tracklist 17 songs deep seems incongruous alongside a 35-minute runtime, it isn’t a mistake. Unfortunately, literally every other song on the album is an interlude, each of which features either RZA briefly waxing philosophical over some Revelations jamming, a classic Wu-style dubbed kung fu movie sample, or a combination of both; in other words, nine tracks worth of useless filler. Now this amount of filler would barely be acceptable on a full-length, 70-minute + joint, so putting nine interlude tracks on a 35-minute compilation album is simply embarrassing, straight up. The lack of actual songs on Chamber Music attests to the presumably rushed nature of the album, and the omission of fan favorites GZA and Method Man cements it.
On the plus side, RZA and the crew were still able to do a lot of things right with this album. For one, it features a long list of respected rap veterans: Masta Ace, Kool G Rap, Cormega, Havoc (from Mobb Deep), M.O.P., AZ, Sadat X, and Sean Price. Each of these artists are excellent picks and sound at home alongside Wu-Tang members Raekwon, Ghostface, Inspectah Deck, U-God, and RZA. Having a superior guest list doesn’t necessarily equate to a superior album, but on Chamber Music the guests don’t disappoint and we’re given only solid verses all the way through the eight actual rap songs. Sonically, the Revelations offer an excellent emulation of the original Wu sound while still effectively capturing that “live band” element that RZA was going for with this release.
All things considered, Chamber Music offers some of the best Wu-Tang music we’ve heard in a while and if it’s any indication of what their next project will sound like, Wu heads will not be disappointed in the coming future.


http://mog.com/blog_posts/1372515/mogbar
RZA, the executive producer of this album, has made it clear that Chamber Music isn't a Wu Tang Clan album, as it doesn't feature all of the members of the clan. Instead the album's sound is clearly "inspired" by Wu's early sound trademarked in Enter The Wu Tang: 36 Chambers, without using samples in the production. All of the beats are live music beds by a band called The Revelations.

The fact that no samples are used changes the overall presentation of the sound. Die-hard Wu Tang fans might be surprised by how clean this album sounds. That gritty 36 Chambers style isn't apparent in Chamber Music, no matter how hard they may try to reclaim it.

Not to say that a live band didn't provide an interesting alternative angle to the Wu Tang sound, it did. Headbangers like "Sound The Horns" couldn't have been accomplished in the level that they were without The Revelations.

That gulliness though, has always been a staple of Wu Tang Clan that I really enjoyed. And although the emcees stay as hard as ever, the real instruments take away from that feeling you get when listening to Wu's earlier work.

Either way, with original clan members like Ghostface, Inspectah Deck, RZA, U-God, and Raekwon contributing verses as well as artists like AZ, Masta Ace, Havoc, Kool G Rap, duo M.O.P., and more making guest appearances, you know the rhymes are going to be up to a high standard.


One thing I was a bit disappointed by is the fact that over half (9) of the 17 tracks on the album are under 1:30 minutes. Most of those tracks are just RZA going on about buddhas or kung fu flicks, others are just short instrumentals.


So with literally every other track being a skit or instrumental, that leaves us with only 8 solid songs. But even with those 8 being quality tracks, worth at least a couple listens, they can't do much in saving the overall playback value of the album.


At the least I would cop a couple of tracks from Chamber Music just to hold you over until the real Wu album comes, but it isn't worth the full $17.99 that iTunes will undoubtedly charge for the whole thing.


Cop it off Amazon for $9.99 (http://www.amazon.com/Chamber-Music-Wu-Tang/dp/B0028ER4OG).


Best Tracks:
"Ill Figures", "Evil Deeds", "Sound The Horns"


Grade: C+

Sultan Stringer
07-02-2009, 01:10 PM
http://vinylmeltdown.com/2009/06/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/

Garnering much speculation when it was first announced, Chamber Music made heads everywhere wonder if Wu-tang was releasing another full length album so soon after their substandard 2007 drop, 8 Diagrams. Others speculated that Chamber Music would merely be a collection of b-sides and recycled verses. Where the album actually falls is somewhere in between these two conjectures. Not quite a studio album, not quite a mixtape, Chamber Music is a compilation album masterminded by RZA which features a good spread of Wu-Tang MCs alongside renown hip hop artists over beats formulated by soul band The Revelations in conjunction with the RZA himself.

If a tracklist 17 songs deep seems incongruous alongside a 35-minute runtime, it isn’t a mistake. Unfortunately, literally every other song on the album is an interlude, each of which features either RZA briefly waxing philosophical over some Revelations jamming, a classic Wu-style dubbed kung fu movie sample, or a combination of both; in other words, nine tracks worth of useless filler. Now this amount of filler would barely be acceptable on a full-length, 70-minute + joint, so putting nine interlude tracks on a 35-minute compilation album is simply embarrassing, straight up. The lack of actual songs on Chamber Music attests to the presumably rushed nature of the album, and the omission of fan favorites GZA and Method Man cements it.
On the plus side, RZA and the crew were still able to do a lot of things right with this album. For one, it features a long list of respected rap veterans: Masta Ace, Kool G Rap, Cormega, Havoc (from Mobb Deep), M.O.P., AZ, Sadat X, and Sean Price. Each of these artists are excellent picks and sound at home alongside Wu-Tang members Raekwon, Ghostface, Inspectah Deck, U-God, and RZA. Having a superior guest list doesn’t necessarily equate to a superior album, but on Chamber Music the guests don’t disappoint and we’re given only solid verses all the way through the eight actual rap songs. Sonically, the Revelations offer an excellent emulation of the original Wu sound while still effectively capturing that “live band” element that RZA was going for with this release.
All things considered, Chamber Music offers some of the best Wu-Tang music we’ve heard in a while and if it’s any indication of what their next project will sound like, Wu heads will not be disappointed in the coming future.


http://mog.com/blog_posts/1372515/mogbar
RZA, the executive producer of this album, has made it clear that Chamber Music isn't a Wu Tang Clan album, as it doesn't feature all of the members of the clan. Instead the album's sound is clearly "inspired" by Wu's early sound trademarked in Enter The Wu Tang: 36 Chambers, without using samples in the production. All of the beats are live music beds by a band called The Revelations.

The fact that no samples are used changes the overall presentation of the sound. Die-hard Wu Tang fans might be surprised by how clean this album sounds. That gritty 36 Chambers style isn't apparent in Chamber Music, no matter how hard they may try to reclaim it.

Not to say that a live band didn't provide an interesting alternative angle to the Wu Tang sound, it did. Headbangers like "Sound The Horns" couldn't have been accomplished in the level that they were without The Revelations.

That gulliness though, has always been a staple of Wu Tang Clan that I really enjoyed. And although the emcees stay as hard as ever, the real instruments take away from that feeling you get when listening to Wu's earlier work.

Either way, with original clan members like Ghostface, Inspectah Deck, RZA, U-God, and Raekwon contributing verses as well as artists like AZ, Masta Ace, Havoc, Kool G Rap, duo M.O.P., and more making guest appearances, you know the rhymes are going to be up to a high standard.


One thing I was a bit disappointed by is the fact that over half (9) of the 17 tracks on the album are under 1:30 minutes. Most of those tracks are just RZA going on about buddhas or kung fu flicks, others are just short instrumentals.


So with literally every other track being a skit or instrumental, that leaves us with only 8 solid songs. But even with those 8 being quality tracks, worth at least a couple listens, they can't do much in saving the overall playback value of the album.


At the least I would cop a couple of tracks from Chamber Music just to hold you over until the real Wu album comes, but it isn't worth the full $17.99 that iTunes will undoubtedly charge for the whole thing.


Cop it off Amazon for $9.99 (http://www.amazon.com/Chamber-Music-Wu-Tang/dp/B0028ER4OG).


Best Tracks:
"Ill Figures", "Evil Deeds", "Sound The Horns"


Grade: C+

nice

-The A to the Z-
07-02-2009, 01:14 PM
Lovely to see HipHopDX giving high rating - they're pretty stingy with their Xs.

Mog review don't mean shit (I say this of course as a Wu Tang dickrider, what they say is pretty valid - 'cept that the album is pretty bloody close to the 'gritty 36 Chamber style'.)

Sultan Stringer
07-02-2009, 01:21 PM
if length and interludes is the only complaint about a cd, than thats a good thing. There isnt 1 subpar song on the album(in my opinion), let alone whack.

benzo
07-02-2009, 01:27 PM
Please buy the album! Come on, buy it already!

I thought you were gonna fuck off already?

Sultan Stringer
07-02-2009, 02:47 PM
I thought you were gonna fuck off already?

http://photos-g.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc1/hs105.snc1/4591_621230013072_16101499_36301262_3891886_n.jpg

racist randy
07-02-2009, 03:29 PM
Damn, I just saw a commercial for this on MTV2, I didn't know this was out already, I will cop tonight...

12weLvE
07-02-2009, 03:33 PM
Just got mine. I ve yet to hear anything from it, but i am going by word of mouf.

racist randy
07-02-2009, 08:30 PM
I just threw it on, I'm on track 8, and I'm feeling this shit, RZa isn't using his wack flow either...

Comptilla
07-03-2009, 05:39 AM
Sorry but I'm gonna keep sayin it...Iron flag was a better album than the W and 8d...that being said I'm gonna cop this chamber music album after work, light one up and crack a ballantine. i'll review later.


Iron flag was my besy WU-Album after the classics. chamber music is nice.

the silencer
07-03-2009, 11:55 AM
aside from the ridiculousness of the skits, I'm loving this album (or i'll just call it a cd)..

Dr. Simon Hurt
07-03-2009, 12:49 PM
"you gonna lead em to some grazing green grass..." lol

444trumpets
07-03-2009, 03:29 PM
i like this album im feeling it i could bump this for awhile

riskyrockwilder
07-04-2009, 10:51 AM
9/10, for me this thing is on par with The W (which i used to hate but time changes everything).

I do have a problem with two things relating to the album though. The first is the way people are reviewing it. Filler tracks have never bothered me because you are not forced to listen to them, they are easily skippable. If an album has 30 songs and 15 are filler (i.e. Tical 2000) it still leaves you with 15 good songs. In the same way this album has 9 filler tracks still leaving you with 8 amazing songs. Well shit, Illmatic only had 10 tracks and of them 8 were amazing so whats the differece. Im pretty sure if a short interlude was added in between each song it wouldnt take away from it being a classic.

Now yes, in some cases its distracting, but on this CD the interludes blend in with the songs to the point that i didnt even realize when one ended and the other began (well I did, but w.e.)

Second thing is the douchebaggery of the marketing (I guess you can call it). In the past, all wu skits are included at the end or beginning (sometimes middle of songs) but on here, at first glance you look at the packaging and you see 17 tracks. None of them are labeled as skits or interludes. THAT is kind of annoying. I knew before i bought it that there was only 8 songs, but I can see others getting pissed about it.

Also i think if they spent a couple extra months and got meth, gza and killa involved and turned it into a full Wu album, it would have been amazing and the redemption RZA talks about in the intro.

Either way, i rate the CD in its entirety a 7/10 (i enjoyed some of the skits) and i rate the actual music a 9/10....all the guests come correct and even outshine wu on some tracks (Cormega)

Tecknowledgist
07-04-2009, 08:44 PM
i think the interludes were pretty cool to the overall listening experience. i thought i was going to hate them, but if it comes down to it, i wouldn't have a problem letting it play all the way through.

favorite verse is probably deck on sound the horns. awesome flow on that

best thing about this is probably the packaging/case haha. album artwork is awesome from the front to back cover and everything in between, including the CD itself with the splattered blood and the tao te ching verses. ill shit

DrBold241
07-04-2009, 09:00 PM
the interludes aren't bad, they do go with the record, but i'm not gonna pay full-length price for an ep.

racist randy
07-05-2009, 12:14 AM
the interludes aren't bad, they do go with the record, but i'm not gonna pay full-length price for an ep.
Yes they do. You can playu this the whole way through. If they drop a pt. 2 I nominate, Beanie Sigel, Common, D-Block, Rakim, Black Thought, and get some Killah Beez on it. Peace. I'm reviewing this next week. stay Tuned.

Sheep Shifter
07-05-2009, 09:13 AM
I'ma have to give it a thorough listen; I ain't like it the first spin.

Sultan Stringer
07-05-2009, 10:39 AM
the interludes aren't bad, they do go with the record, but i'm not gonna pay full-length price for an ep.

10 dollars at best buy

beautifulrock
07-05-2009, 06:08 PM
Yes they do. You can playu this the whole way through. If they drop a pt. 2 I nominate, Beanie Sigel, Common, D-Block, Rakim, Black Thought, and get some Killah Beez on it. Peace. I'm reviewing this next week. stay Tuned.
Yea, can't wait, especially after you called Transformers 2 a "great" movie.

WuSmoWke
07-05-2009, 07:21 PM
Shit!!!, The Wu is back on map with this I tell u!!! All my friends are on it!!! Shit's really nostalgic... Kinda felt "The W" album energy somehow... shit's tight!

6 Brix
07-05-2009, 07:35 PM
this isnt a REAL new album.... isit ?

beautifulrock
07-05-2009, 07:53 PM
this isnt a REAL new album.... isit ?Call it what you like, it's new material and it sure as hell feels like a Wu album. Only thing calling into question whether this is a real album or not is the length.

Jin10304
07-05-2009, 08:42 PM
No RZA has said its not a Clan album considering its missing 4 members. More in the vein of Wu Meets Indie

Cappadonna36
07-05-2009, 09:20 PM
word...something like "Wu meets NY rap legends"

Cappadonna36
07-05-2009, 09:22 PM
and yo...Havoc fucks everything up IMO.

i respect dude as a producer, but i think he's mad garbage on the mic

Sultan Stringer
07-05-2009, 10:27 PM
and yo...Havoc fucks everything up IMO.

i respect dude as a producer, but i think he's mad garbage on the mic

i think his verse is dope... some review sites think his twitter line kills it

Sultan Stringer
07-05-2009, 10:29 PM
another positive review

http://www.411mania.com/music/album_reviews/109191/Wu-Tang-Clan---Wu-Tang-Chamber-Music-Review.htm

Wu-Tang Clan - Wu-Tang Chamber Music Review
Posted by Patrick Robinson on 07.04.2009

After the mixed reception that 8 Diagrams received, the Clan has returned with another album that RZA promises is a throwback to the sound on their debut album! Is it really the taste of nostalgia the fans have been craving, or is it just an empty promise?

The Wu-Tang Clan are arguably one of the greatest rap groups ever, not to mention the largest. Their debut album Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers) is a certified Classic, and their follow up album, Wu-Tang Forever is hailed as one of the best double disc albums in the history of hip-hop.

In recent years though, long time fans have watched as Ol’ Dirty Bastard’s death and internal conflicts resulted in a long hiatus from the hip-hop game. Their comeback album, 8 Diagrams in 2007 was welcomed, but largely viewed as being disappointing compared to what they are capable of.

Fast forward to 2009, and we are presented with Wu-Tang Chamber Music, a project executive produced by RZA which he describes as: “totally in the chamber, or in the mind-frame of Wu-Tang like in the [Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers)] days. But it's not a Wu-Tang album. The whole Clan's not on this album. But it couldn't be in any other category but Wu-Tang”

With that in mind, is Wu-Tang Chamber Music indeed a throwback to the group’s Classic debut that fans have been craving for?



Tracks

1. Redemption
2. Kill Too Hard Ft. Inspectah Deck, U-God & Masta Ace
3. The Abbot (RZA)
4. Harbor Masters Ft. Ghostface Killah, Inspectah Deck & AZ
5. Sheep State (RZA)
6. Radiant Jewels Ft. Raekwon, Cormega & Sean Price
7. Supreme Architecture (RZA)
8. Evil Deeds Ft. Ghostface Killah, RZA & Havoc
9. Wise Men (RZA)
10. I Wish You Were Here Ft. Ghostface Killah & Tre Williams
11. Fatal Hesitation
12. Ill Figures Ft. Raekwon, M.O.P. & Kool G Rap
13. Free Like ODB (RZA)
14. Sound The Horns Ft. Inspectah Deck, U-God & Sadat X
15. Enlightened Statues (RZA)
16. NYC Crack Ft. RZA & Thea Van Seijen
17. One Last Question…

I should explain the album’s structure before we get into the thick of the review for those who may not be aware of it. Wu-Tang Chamber Music is a collection of 8 songs, each proceeded by an Interlude of sorts, and rounded out with one as well. The tracks with (RZA) denoted next to them represent Interludes where RZA gives his thoughts on various topics, such as what “The Abbot” represents in kung-fu movies and how it relates to his position in the Wu-Tang Clan. Tracks 1 and 11 on the other hand, are samples from old kung-fu movies, much like what was found on Enter The Wu-Tang (36 Chambers).

With that in mind, it’s probably better to consider this as a ‘mood album’ as rather than try and craft a whole new project, RZA has aimed to try and recapture the essence of what made their debut album so popular, and he largely succeeds on Wu-Tang Chamber Music. The production was overseen by RZA to ensure that it was faithful to his original sound, but is mostly handled by The Revelations, a soul band from Brooklyn, and interestingly, Lil Fame from M.O.P. going under the “Fizzy Womack” alias. The grimy-sounding drums on “Harbor Masters” and “Ill Figures” sound like they were lifted straight out of a recording session from 1993. The opening seconds of “Kill Too Hard” will also transport a Wu-Tang fan to the 36 Chambers / Liquid Swords style of RZA’s production.

Lyrically, there’s a feel of the 90s New York lyricism which has been sorely lacking in the hip-hop game in recent years. Inspectah Deck reminds us why he’s one of the best jump-off artist’s with his opening verse on “Kill Too Hard” as he rips into the light percussion on the track. U-God also seems to have become invigorated since 8 Diagrams, as he keeps pace with Deck with ease. The Masta Ace of A Long Hot Summer seems to be forgotten as he opens up with “I’m going to the Summer Jam concert to bash your hero”, sounding more aggressive on this one verse than he has in years as he closes out with “It’s your boy Ace, BK’s own, all you ringtone rap dudes please stay home”.

“Radiant Jewels” is the best track on the album as Raekwon reminds us why Only Built 4 Cuban Linx II is still a highly anticipated album. Over light production backed by a mild string loop, Rae opens up the track for Cormega to absolutely steal the show with a stunning verse which should act as a refresher as to why Cormega was once mentioned alongside Nas and AZ as one of New York’s names to watch. Sean Price rounds out the track, and although his verse isn’t as good as Cormega’s, he certainly holds his own.

The guests on Wu-Tang Chamber Music are largely outside the usual circle of Wu-Tang affiliates. Havoc proves that his skills as a lyricist have improved greatly since Mobb Deep’s early years on “Evil Deeds”. M.O.P.’s presence on “Ill Figures” will make you wonder what a RZA-headed M.O.P. album would sound like (here’s a hint: Damn good) and listening to Kool G Rap gives you an insight to Ghost and Rae’s slang-driven style of rap as one of the pioneer’s of hip-hop from back in the day.

There are a couple of problems which may put you off about this album though. Firstly, it’s really only 8 songs and 9 Interludes (albeit fairly good ones that enhance the mood), and running for just over 35 minutes, makes it feel more like an EP and a fully fledged album. Secondly, a couple of the songs are censored (on my version anyway) for some inexplicable reason, despite the others containing profanity etc. It was quite distracting on “Harbor Masters” to miss every other word during Ghost’s verse. Finally, Method Man, GZA and Masta Killa are missing from the project. I understand that Meth is touring for Blackout! 2, but where are GZA and Masta Killa? As a big fan of GZA’s work, it was a bit disappointing in that sense too.

(THIS GUY DEF WAS REVIEWING A BOOTLEG, THE VERSION YOU BUY IN THE STORE IS UNCENSORED)



The 411: This one certainly isn’t for the mainstream, but for the fans who were a little frustrated with the direction that 8 Diagrams took and crave that 90s sound from the Clan. Wu-Tang fans should definitely check this one out, and for those who may be unfamiliar with the ruckus, this should be your first stop in discovering just what made the Clan so popular back in the day.

Final Score: 8.0 [ Very Good ] legend

Sultan Stringer
07-05-2009, 10:34 PM
another positive review

http://www.examiner.com/x-14684-HipHop-Music-Examiner~y2009m7d4-Review-WuTang-Chamber-Music

Review: Wu-Tang Chamber Music
July 4, 12:49 PM
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Wu-Tang Chamber Music, E1 Music

Wu-Tang Chamber Music is not an official Wu-Tang Clan album, but a compilation of songs overseen by Wu-Tang mastermind RZA. What makes Chamber music unique is the use of live instrumentation as opposed to samples.

The live music is provided by a soul band from Brooklyn, NY called The Revelations. Lil' Fame from M.O.P, under the moniker Fizzy Womack contributes to all but one of the full length songs.

Chamber Music is an album full of live music, yet still has the gritty sound of dusty samples that RZA introduced to the world on 1993's Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers).

“This album has a very live element of today’s musicians playing the vibe of Wu-Tang", said RZA. "The vibe we would normally sample, the vibe of things that we would accumulate through old soul songs, jazz songs, kung-fu movies whatever, now you’ve got musicians that can play this vibe with Wu-Tang MC’s rapping over it. The goal of this album is definitely paying homage to our early sound. On this album, we make it sound like it was in the 36 Chambers era. To me, what also adds to this album, you’ve got the Wu-Tang MC's but you also got your other favorite MC's from that era like Havoc, Cormega and others."

Five of the remaining 8 Clan members appear on Chamber Music in addition to some of New York City's best MC's from the 1990's. Joining the Wu-Tang Clan is M.O.P, Masta Ace, Sadat X, AZ, Cormega, Havoc, Sean Price, and Kool G. Rap.

Normally forgotten Clan members Inspectah Deck and U-God bring their A-game to Chamber Music. On Kill Too Hard Deck raps, Ain't nuttin' gonna stop kid from gettin' his due/No, your feet's not big enough to fit in his shoes. On the same track U-God gripes about his status within the Clan, My apartment is a hole in the wall/Pass me the rock, stop holding the ball.

On Harbor Masters the Clan's most consistent MC, Ghostface Killah trades rhymes with Inspectah Deck and AZ over a replayed drum loop and funky guitars.

I Wish You Were Here is a remake of the 1975 Al Green song of the same name. It features Tre Williams playing the part of Reverend Al, and Ghostface Killah cozying up to his favorite girl--What up boo, you know that Ghost loves you/I get butterflies when we hug and kiss, do you?

Ill Figures sounds like a cypher session with some of the hardest MC's in the history of rap music. Raekwon, M.O.P, and Kool G. Rap try to out-gangsta each on this track. Raekwon spits, I love gettin' dressed up, sweats and techs/Ride around the hood good, gettin' Gotti respect.

RZA closes out Chamber Music with a solo song titled NYC Crack. NYC Crack is braggadocio battle rap with the Wu-Tang Clan's abbot proclaiming his greatness, I got forty million records sold, some platinum, some gold/Some we just put out to meet the tax code/Your career will be shorter than the 21st of December/You'll be one of those thousand rappers no one remembers/While my name is carved on trophies, colleges recite my bars/You can look up and see my name upon the stars.

The problem with Chamber Music is there are more interludes than actual songs. In between tracks RZA speaks over live instrumentation connecting the previous song to the next. It also doesn't help matters that Chamber Music clocks in at just under 36 minutes in length.

Method Man, GZA, and Masta Killa are the three Clan members who do not appear on Chamber Music. GZA is the elder statesmen of the group while Method Man is the most popular and charismatic. It would have been nice to hear their contributions to this project.

All around Wu-Tang Chamber Music is a good album despite those omissions. The shortness of the CD and the abundance of interludes over songs just leaves the listener wanting more.

Wu-Tang Chamber Music gets 4 MPC's.

Sultan Stringer
07-05-2009, 10:38 PM
another positive review

http://www.nappyafro.com/2009/07/03/wu-tang-clanchamber-music/

With love comes jealousy. And a strong rise always leaves room for a rough fall. However, I never understood why Wu-Tang caught such strong hate after Wu-Tang Forever. It may have been over saturation of the market between the highly successful classic 36 Chambers; with the addition of successful solo efforts from the members as well. The concept of a group of strong rappers and producers creating superb group work then boosting their own singles cred was a huge success; a formula still flawed to this day due to ego.

As mentioned though, over saturation led to Wu-Tang only holding to a loyal fanbase; the climate of music and new artists taking the place of the Shaolin street sweepers. But why do people talk about the Wu like they can’t spit or something? 5 albums deep and quality material along the way. But if a good album happens and nobody listens…did it really happen?

There’s your philosophical question for the day, in the spirit of the Shaolin monk.

But it now leads us to Chamber Music, a compilation album endorsed by the Clan, featuring 5 [Inspectah Deck, Ghkostface Killah(!!!), U-God, Raekwon, and RZA] of the standing 8 members of Wu-Tang [We miss you ODB. I like it raaaaaaw too.] with two interesting concepts introduced by lead producer RZA, naturally. The first are features by a who’s who of NY spitters from Havoc of Mobb Deep to M.O.P; adding a fresh sound to the familiar Wu-Tang rhymes and beats we know and love. The second, a very welcome decision, is the use of LIVE instruments from soul band, The Revelations.

Despite the hate they catch, I was quite excited to hear about this release. Does this look to be another quality offering from a group not given enough credit for releasing them, or does this look to be a cash-in on a recognized standard in Hip-Hop? No subtitles for this one, but I’ll make my words clear and true on this.

1. Redemption (Intro)
Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
The excerpt for this song makes complete sense when you think about it, featuring a old-time cinema intro for that feel of something epic. Military style drums and strings help set the tone of a disgraced warrior taking his last shot at redeeming the glory of his clan’s name. Beautiful way to set the tone of this album, the intro quite fitting. For those who know the Clan’s history, it resonates.

2. Kill Too Hard
Featuring Inspectah Deck, U-God, & Masta Ace; Produced by Gintas Junusonis & Fizzy Womack
Definitely feeling the beat. Sounds like one that Camp Lo would have hopped on with no question with the old school swag to it. Fortunately, the trio of rhymers know exactly what to do with this. All three move with a pretty brisk pace to the short track, but it’s a great way to start the album on an energized note. This is good ol’ fashioned NY street spit and there isn’t a thing wrong with that. Only gripe would be length, but that’s just nitpicking. Thumbs up.

3. The Abbot (Skit)
Featuring RZA; Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
RZA kicks some knowledge in the form of an old Kung-Fu adage about an Abbot. The background music is ominous, another taste of what The Revelations can do. I’m ready to hear them on an actual song at this point. Worth listening to for the message.

4. Harbor Masters
Featuring Ghostface Killah, Inspectah Deck, & AZ; Produced by Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, & Fizzy Womack
Enjoying the old school feel of the beats thus far. Nothing terribly complicated, just good drum patterns with the right elements added to keep them moving. Ghostface brings the bravado and wild metaphors, describing a level of lavishness on a Jay-Z level. Deck and AZ also tell tales of rocking the show and all the spoils that come with it. Nice cruising song or just something to vibe to. I can appreciate a track like this, with “swag” tracks that try to do too much. They express that point without all the fat. Frank Lucas style, ya dig?

5. Sheep State
Featuring RZA; Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, Noah Rubin
More proverbs from The RZA. Another ominous overlay by the talented Revelations. I wish he’d space these things out though. Especially at the start of the album! Can we hit them over the head with some heat first before all the window dressing? It’s not that he doesn’t have a point to what he’s saying…just very ill-placed.

6. Radiant Jewels
Featuring Raekwon, Cormega, & Sean Price; Produced by Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, & Fizzy Womack
Beautiful.

This makes up for that ill-placed skit. In a big way.

Raekwon bursts out the gate with a wonderfully gutter verse. It’s almost impossible for Cormega and Price to catch up, but they show no lack of trying. I cannot express the simple beauty of this beat. Drum pattern and a well placed string set. Classy. A stark contrast to the venomous words laid over it, but it all blends together perfectly.

Easily the best of this album thus far. The song lives up to the title and all parties involved should be proud. Why Raekwon doesn’t get more respect, I’ll never know. His verse alone could stand against the current heavy-hitters.

7. Supreme Architecture
Featuring RZA; Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
Another RZA proverb. Another ill-placed time for it. Again, no problem with what he’s saying or what is backgrounding it. It just throws the flow all off. Moving on.

8. Evil Deeds
Featuring Ghostface Killah, RZA, & Havoc of Mobb Deep; Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, & Fizzy Womack
This team of Kelley, Rubin, and Womack is a blessing. They have yet to falter on the production and this is another standout. There production is the level of class that Rick Ross was going for in Deeper Than Rap; this team making it seem effortless track after track.

A seductively played piano backs a ominous drum pattern; Killah, RZA, and Havoc digging into a dark place to pull their rhymes, reveling in the sins they’ve committed while reminding you they’d gladly commit more. The piano breakdown mixed with RZA’s hook is also delightful. The track is engrossing and I’m simply amazed at how well they’ve brought this together. This trio of producers need more work and when they get it, they need rappers as skilled as the three that murdered this track. We have another standout.

Props to Havoc for dropping the first GOOD Twitter punch I’ve heard. “I ain’t wit that Twitter shit, nigga’s try to follow me.” Love it.

9. Wise Man
Featuring RZA; Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
Copy and paste what I’ve said about these and keep it moving. Geez. We get it. Num-Yo-Ho-Renge-Kyo and all that jazz. More FIYAH please.

10. I Wish You Were Here
Featuring Ghostface Killah & Tre Williams; Produced by Bob Perry & Fizzy Womack
Warning you now, this beat is going to sound like an unfinished version of “I’d Rather Be With You” by Bootsy Collins. That is NOT a bad thing. Tre Williams belts a soulful hook to cater to this throwback; Ghostface’s stream of consciousness flow aiding to tell of a story of love lost. Tre takes the brunt work of the track, but Ghost simply NAILS it for the time he gets. I was NOT expecting a track like this from this album, but I am so pleasantly surprised.

I’m also impressed that rappers try tracks like this and get it ALL wrong. Meanwhile, Starky Love [Ghostface ya’ll, keep up!], Tre, and their producers make this such an easy exercise in spitting your feelings. This album is hitting a block of hot tracks ever since Radiant Jewels and I’m hoping it continues. Another keeper and a go-to for how to do love profession in Hip-Hop RIGHT.

11. Fatal Hesitation
Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
The same as the RZA “proverbs” just without RZA and an extended Kung-Fu movie quote. I get the sudden urge to see the Adult Swim blurbs after so many of these. Moving on…

12. Ill Figures
Featuring Raekown, M.O.P., & Kool G Rap; Produced by Fizzy Womack & Josh Werner
Minimalist drums that compound harder where the hook should be. It’s intense, focused, and so are the rappers. It’s a stripped down hustle anthem, but done very well. No hooks from anyone and it backhands you with sudden metaphors and earnest real talk from all three. In a world of over-production, this is definitely refreshing to hear and I only wish it was longer. I definitely wouldn’t skip this and I am enjoying that the album is bucking a lot of hip-hop conventions in everything from layout to production. Another winner as the hot block continues for this album.

13. Free Like ODB
Featuring RZA; Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
RZA’s earnest thoughts about ODB set to a crazy drum solo. Of all of these skits like this, this definitely would be the most touching.

14. Sound The Horns
Featuring Inspectah Deck, U-God, & Sadat X; Produced by Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, Fizzy Womack, Gintas Janusonis, & Josh Werner
I want to like this beat. I like everything about it but the obnoxious set of horns at the beginning and peak up in the song. You’ll know em’ when you hear em’. Otherwise, we’ve got some good old fashioned up North bragging, boasting, and smack-talking. I can’t say there’s anything bad about the track aside from that horn selection. It’s just a good track.

The problem is, it is merely good compared to so much great before it. Tough listening to this after that nice block of heat prior. On its own merits, perfectly fine; but the placement creates a quick dip for the streak the album is on.

15. Enlightened Status
Featuring RZA; Produced by The Revelations, Bob Perry, & Noah Rubin
I’ll take this time to say, the Revelations should have been used on a track. I feel they’re wasted just doing these skits when I can already think of some awesome ways they could have contributed to the previous tracks. Hell, imagine what they could have crafted left to their own devices? Oh well…you know what happens here. Next.

16. NYC Crack
Featuring RZA & Thea Van Seijen; Produced by RZA, Fizzy Womack, & Andrew Kelley
This would be at home on the Afro Samurai soundtrack I love this track. RZA’s flow is driven and this beat sounds like it was made in another dimension in the best way possible. Van Seijen adds another other-worldly quality to this track, her Dutch wail making for a left field hook the likes of which would be tough to forget. Haunting and a mash of elements that create something worthy of listen after listen. You just need to hear it.

17. One Last Question…
Featuring RZA
10 seconds. Someone asks RZA what type of Buddah he’d be. I would have rather they closed with a song, but oh well.

Bottom Line:
I am simply blown away at the QUALITY of this album. The production is top shelf and layered to give it a sound unique to anything you’d hear out right now. The rappers all bring the heat. Even when one of them outshines everyone else on a track [i.e. Raekown in "Radiant Jewels"] the others still turn in worthy efforts that aren’t phoned in. I listen to this and wonder why Wu-Tang catches the hate they catch. If it weren’t for the average, compared to what else is on display, nature of “Sound The Horns” and the ill-advised placements of the skits, this would be a perfect album that I would defend to the death for a 5 star treatment.

This is an album that was crafted by rappers sure of their skill. No need for over-production, over the top features, or other gimmicks. Listening to it and thinking more about the intro…I wouldn’t be surprised if everybody involved challenges themselves to go above and beyond what everyone was used to. I’m talking for not just the Clan, but Hip-Hop as well. They’ve bent conventions and crafted something daring. For the Wu haters out there; I dare you to deny this offering. It’s a CD that can be learned from and appreciated on many levels and I encourage fans of HIP-HOP to listen it.

The production team of Kelley, Womack, and Rubin deserves major respect for a hell of a coming out party production-wise. RZA, Ghostface, and the like spit as if they were unsigned; hungry to prove themselves. It brings an energy level and mastery of their styles that helps craft something elevated from the usual. No one should be ashamed of their contributions to this album…well…maybe RZA. A SKIT AFTER EVERY SONG MAN?! Geez.

Cut the skits and get straight to the music and you have one of the best albums of this year. I expected good, I was not expecting this. Go out of your way to give this a listen, Wu-Tang fan or not and you will get a glimpse of what skill mixed with sheer creativity can get you. The score would be higher if not for the broken flow due to the skits.

With offerings this good, I hope Wu-Tang lives forever. Haters be damned.

nappyPicks: “Radiant Jewels”, “Evil Deeds”, “NYC Crack”, & “I Wish You Were Here”

BGS
07-06-2009, 01:29 PM
best track is "kill too hard" hands down...evil deeds is a close 2nd...inspectah deck is on the right way again...he kills it...NYC Crack would be dope but thea sounds really bad...nothing new though...thanks rza to put her on a track again, she really is a 90ties legend...whatever fuck it...

LiveFast
07-06-2009, 10:21 PM
Chamber Music review from from hipster heaven- pitchfork.com:

http://pitchfork.com/reviews/albums/13242-wu-tang-chamber-music-vol-1/

Wu-Tang Clan
Wu-Tang: Chamber Music (Vol. 1)
[E1; 2009]

7.5 out of 10

First things first: Wu-Tang Chamber Music is not a Wu-Tang Clan album, despite the presence of that W logo on the cover. About half the verses on the album come not from Wu members but from fellow Carhartt-era rap vets like Sean Price and Cormega. I guess Old 90s Rap Dudes Chamber Music didn't have the same ring. There's no Method Man, no GZA. RZA doesn't produce any beats, though we do hear his voice over and over. Second: Wu-Tang Chamber Music is only barely an album. Of the 17 tracks on the CD, only eight are actual songs; the rest are strictly interstitial pieces, kung-fu movie samples, or bits of marble-mouthed mythology already familiar to anyone who read The Wu-Tang Manual.

And make no mistake: People who read The Wu-Tang Manual are definitely the target audience here. The mere existence of this LP has a weird late-90s quality to it; it's a throwback to the time when record-store shelves were crammed with with albums by vaguely Wu-affiliated crews like Killarmy and Sunz of Man, when labels would rush out any old crap they could slap that W logo on. A decade on, it's oddly comforting that a label would aim for your Wu-Tang consumer dollar even when that dollar barely exists anymore.

But if Wu-Tang Chamber Music is a hackneyed cash-grab, it's a pretty good hackneyed cash grab. Because once you get past the brevity and the non-Wuness of it all, there is some beautifully executed hardhead grown-folks rap shit on here. The music comes from the Brooklyn soul band the Revelations, who do live-band rap music as well as just about anyone, which is to say that you can't tell you're hearing a live band most of the time. There's an organic old-soul crackle to the incendiary trumpet-bursts on "Sound the Horns" or the slow-rolling bassline on "Ill Figures", but that warmth is the sort of warmth that the better East Coast producers can get out of old records. And so credit might be due to Fizzy Womack, otherwise known as M.O.P.'s Lil Fame, probably the best beatmaker currently working the underground NYC circuit. Fizzy co-produced every actual song on the album, and these tracks have a hard-hitting simplicity that probably serves a quickie all-posse album like this one better than RZA's choked paranoia would. And because the Revelations play music even during the interludes, those bits never fuck up the flow of the album.

And it certainly helps that most of the craggy veterans here, Wu and otherwise, go in hard on this thing. Most of these songs don't have actual choruses, so gnarled shit-talk is the focus here, and the assembled old gods still do it well. On "Ill Figures", Kool G Rap does twisted-up, lispy, half-off-beat gun-talk so well that you'd probably guess he'd been doing it for decades even if you didn't know. Inspectah Deck, on "Sound the Horns", comes with easily one of the top five C. Thomas Howell name-checks I've ever heard on a rap song: "The sound of the horns says it's on / We storm through like C. Thomas, Red Dawn." ("P. Swayze" would've fit in just as well there, but Deck never goes the obvious route.) Cormega remains one of the only rappers who can get away with a line about "lyrical elevation causes mental stimulation" because he throws that in the middle of a verse so jammed with internal rhymes and left turns ("this is a lyrical aqueduct"?) that you only barely notice. Even RZA, never a great rapper, comes with at least one hot line: "My moms put gunpowder inside my Similac."

And in his three appearances here, Ghostface Killah maintains his status as Wu-Tang's MVP, ranting about the shrooms on his tour rider on "Harbor Masters" or kicking unbelievably badass warnings on "Evil Deeds": "Don't ever come at me sideways, hands in ya pocket/ Cuz I will turn to Steven Seagal, rip ya arm out ya socket." But Ghostface's highlight, and the album's, comes on "I Wish You Were Here", the one moment of tenderness in the midst of all those boxcutter threats. Over a slow, quavery soul-jam beat, Ghost bleats out one of those emotive sex-rap verses that he does better than anyone else before ceding the spotlight to a raspy old-school soul clinic from singer Tre Williams, who comes off like Gerald Alston on 8 Diagrams' "Stick Me for My Riches".

So, OK, the various rappers here can lay on the get-off-my-lawn stuff a little thick. (Topics railed against include Hot 97's Summer Jam, skinny jeans, Twitter, and the ever-popular "ringtone rappers".) And there's really no compelling reason for this LP to exist beyond these guys' desire to remind us that they're alive. But I haven't heard an album full of anachronistic tough-guy stuff this satisfying in a long time. The world may have moved on to songs with the word "swag" in the title, but these guys are still out there, spitting grown-man gangsterisms to anyone who will listen. I call that nobility.

— Tom Breihan, July 6, 2009

theDZA
07-07-2009, 05:32 AM
^ RZA was never a great rapper!?

wtf is up wiv that

Slide
07-07-2009, 05:36 AM
Superior

lynskey
07-07-2009, 05:40 AM
^ RZA was never a great rapper!?

wtf is up wiv that
RZA has a horrible voice. he has never been a good rapper.

stick to producing.

this album is trash too. I'm sick of these beats.
it aint the 90's no more

Sultan Stringer
07-07-2009, 06:57 AM
...

But if Wu-Tang Chamber Music is a hackneyed cash-grab, it's a pretty good hackneyed cash grab. Because once you get past the brevity and the non-Wuness of it all, there is some beautifully executed hardhead grown-folks rap shit on here. The music comes from the Brooklyn soul band the Revelations, who do live-band rap music as well as just about anyone, which is to say that you can't tell you're hearing a live band most of the time. There's an organic old-soul crackle to the incendiary trumpet-bursts on "Sound the Horns" or the slow-rolling bassline on "Ill Figures", but that warmth is the sort of warmth that the better East Coast producers can get out of old records. And so credit might be due to Fizzy Womack, otherwise known as M.O.P.'s Lil Fame, probably the best beatmaker currently working the underground NYC circuit. Fizzy co-produced every actual song on the album, and these tracks have a hard-hitting simplicity that probably serves a quickie all-posse album like this one better than RZA's choked paranoia would. And because the Revelations play music even during the interludes, those bits never fuck up the flow of the album.

And it certainly helps that most of the craggy veterans here, Wu and otherwise, go in hard on this thing. Most of these songs don't have actual choruses, so gnarled shit-talk is the focus here, and the assembled old gods still do it well. On "Ill Figures", Kool G Rap does twisted-up, lispy, half-off-beat gun-talk so well that you'd probably guess he'd been doing it for decades even if you didn't know. Inspectah Deck, on "Sound the Horns", comes with easily one of the top five C. Thomas Howell name-checks I've ever heard on a rap song: "The sound of the horns says it's on / We storm through like C. Thomas, Red Dawn." ("P. Swayze" would've fit in just as well there, but Deck never goes the obvious route.) Cormega remains one of the only rappers who can get away with a line about "lyrical elevation causes mental stimulation" because he throws that in the middle of a verse so jammed with internal rhymes and left turns ("this is a lyrical aqueduct"?) that you only barely notice. Even RZA, never a great rapper, comes with at least one hot line: "My moms put gunpowder inside my Similac."

....

So, OK, the various rappers here can lay on the get-off-my-lawn stuff a little thick. (Topics railed against include Hot 97's Summer Jam, skinny jeans, Twitter, and the ever-popular "ringtone rappers".) And there's really no compelling reason for this LP to exist beyond these guys' desire to remind us that they're alive. But I haven't heard an album full of anachronistic tough-guy stuff this satisfying in a long time. The world may have moved on to songs with the word "swag" in the title, but these guys are still out there, spitting grown-man gangsterisms to anyone who will listen. I call that nobility.

— Tom Breihan, July 6, 2009

http://i28.tinypic.com/elb7o9.gif

Ghost In The 'Lac
07-07-2009, 07:47 AM
Breihan always brings the heat generally.

theDZA
07-07-2009, 08:50 AM
RZA has a horrible voice. he has never been a good rapper.

stick to producing.

this album is trash too. I'm sick of these beats.
it aint the 90's no more

ent u the cat who said he prefers dopium over ob4cl and liquid swords?

i think you are...

theDZA
07-10-2009, 09:17 AM
finally got this through my door...gotta say i am really impressed and i'm looking foward to a part 2 - hopefully all the clan will be on it and it will be a lil bit longer

my favourite tracks have gotta be:

I Wish You Were Here - Ghostface and Tre Williams
and
NYC Crack - RZA and Thea

but all the tracks are hot and a very good sign of things to come from the clan

8
07-10-2009, 03:17 PM
3.6/5 - sounds like a compilation, not an album. Beats soundin' waaaay too similar (the danger of usin' a life band with the same instruments on every track). "8 Diagrams" ripZ this shit to shreds - let the hate begin':D

52 Pick-up
07-11-2009, 05:38 PM
Evil Deeds is my shit. I fuckin love that song.

52 Pick-up
07-11-2009, 05:39 PM
3.6/5 - sounds like a compilation, not an album.
Because it is a compilation.

8
07-11-2009, 06:52 PM
Because it is a compilation.
...advertised as an album: http://www.noelshack.com/voir/130309/newwualbum039744.jpg
:picture:

52 Pick-up
07-12-2009, 01:21 AM
I don't care what it's advertised as. At the most I'll call it an EP.

8
07-12-2009, 06:17 AM
^^Who cares what U call it?:D

racist randy
07-12-2009, 11:43 PM
It's NOT a clan album, it's a Wu Meets Indie Culture type album, stop being dumb fucks for once.

8
07-13-2009, 03:41 AM
It's NOT a clan album, it's a Wu Meets Indie Culture type album, stop being dumb fucks for once.
Nobody (of us) said that, B.*D

Krusha
07-14-2009, 11:01 AM
Bought it....
Banga!

claaa7
07-14-2009, 02:34 PM
still waiting for this to arrive in the mail together with "The Blaqprint" but man is this release dope.. Raekwon should get Lil' Fame and RZA to produce, mix and oversee CL2 and we'd probably have a 4-sure classic.

claaa7
07-16-2009, 01:25 PM
finally received my copy today and i've been blasting it twice today and shit is still as heavy as i remembered it.. the narrations by RZA doesn't do much for the album though, the intro and Fatal Hesitation would've worked better as the only interludes between these 8 bangers. i really hope that song "I Wish You Were Here" is somewhat a blueprint for how 'Wizard of Poetry' is gonna sound; it should be a classic that way.

8.5/10

RynMur
07-17-2009, 09:54 PM
I would rate this between Superior and Banger. I don't understand why people are hating on this. First, it's not a wu-tang clan album so it would be great to have mef, gza and masta on this, but nonetheless it has az, cormega, masta ace, sean price, g rap, mop, havoc. Damn how can anyone argue about those features? Second, this is a compilation like an ep album, and it's really not a big deal if it only has 8 tracks. Atleast, the wu is putting out good music for their fans. Third, the Revelations did a superior job on the production. Brought me back to that golden era of hip hop.

There are only 2 tracks on here (excluding skits) that I wouldn't add to my wu-tang playlist...which are I wish you were here & sound the horns. I marked the album down half a point for not having much tracks and too many skits (although some of them blended well with the album's concept).

Top 5: Harbor Masters, Radiant Jewelz (fav), Evil Deeds, Ill Figures, NYC Crack

Grade: (4/5) A-

The Hound
07-22-2009, 02:14 AM
The little content it had I thought it was pretty good - Ghostface and INS were dope.

beautifulrock
07-22-2009, 02:23 AM
I reversed the end of NYC Crack where the kung fu guy is talking, some really eerie shit in there, I really wanna go back and see if there is a lot more backmasking in the catalog...

check two
07-23-2009, 02:54 PM
Like has been said plenty of times, the album is a little short, but does every album have to be like 70 plus minutes? I like a shorter album, cassette tape vibe.

Dr. Simon Hurt
07-23-2009, 04:51 PM
^^^this wouldn't even fill up one side of a casette tape

no replay value whatsoever

anyone notice sultan and keelay disappeared once the album dropped?

check two
07-23-2009, 06:21 PM
lol I don't think one side of a cassette tape holds 35 minutes?

NaturalBornKilla
07-23-2009, 06:23 PM
I have not listined to this cd yet

NaturalBornKilla
07-23-2009, 06:24 PM
would have been much better with the gza, method man, or masta killa on this cd.

GhettoGnom
07-27-2009, 09:05 AM
I hope RZA realize how much better this has been recieved than some of his other new work, now from http://kevinnottingham.com/


Wu-Tang Clan: Chamber Music



Ominous string instruments. Bootleg kung fu movie samples. Wisdom cautiously spilling from the sealed lips of ancient martial arts masters. Sword strikes. Track titles like “Supreme Architecture” and “Kill Too Hard.” Yes! Just when autotune was declared war upon by the likes of King Jiggamayne, this secret second roundhouse to the loudmouth of rap wackness is released to the masses, and these legendary beasts from the east are unleashed to feast on beats that sound like they were saved from The Flood that almost crumbled The Dream. RZA is damn near the peak of his artistry once again. Pay attention, grasshoppers and hipsters.

The first track naturally is called “Redemption” (peace to Mr. X-citement). Then comes the majestic horns. And then comes some intriguingly relevant vocal samples speaking hip hop history through kung fu commentary. Gotta love it:“It was long ago, but he’s never forgotten that day. nd you’re his only hope to redeem the Clan, and retrieve our army!” “When you learn, you’ll know not to make those mistakes.”
Inspectah Deck rips open the guts of the album, refreshingly sticking to his pistols, instead of trying to keep up with the young guns. Not “For Heaven’s Sake” level, but flashbacks of “the Lone Ranger/ code red: DANGER!” MC that we first fell in love with. It’s been a long time. Wu shouldn’t have left you. Yes, 8 Diagrams wasn’t exactly what most people were looking for, but if you are the kind of head who seeks the vintage sound of the Supreme Shaolin Ceremony Masters of the 90’s, then your wish has been officially granted by the RZArecta. Brooklyn soul band The Revelations also flesh out the fuzzy and dusty but digital grit whipped up in the pyrex pot of Prince Rakeem, embellishing each track with live instrumentation that does nothing but make everything sound much more authentic and fucking awesome. Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, and M.O.P.’s Lil’ Fame also provide soundscape support, with Fizzy Womack surprising the most of all, contributing to seven of the album’s seventeen sinister selections. It’s never really clear who actually does what, but it’s clear that what they are all doing collectively, is returning to the feel of the 36th Chamber like it is 1993 all over again, but not rehashing the rap madness that set it all off. They simply carry on tradition like super ninjas on a mission: save 2009 hip hop from bullshit. They succeed with flying colors and bloody shurikens.
So, after Deck gets finished slicing the song open, a gruff ass U-God bodies the beat (I guess RZA and U-God worked that alleged unpaid debt situation out, thank goodness). Then Baby-U passes the mic to… Masta Ace? Ill. And even though Ace’s verse isn’t exactly mindblowing, it’s still lovely to hear these three veterans rhyme together over a moody organ riff and some chunky drums, radioplay be damned. We don’t need no hook, word to Shaq Diesel. Half the songs on this album don’t stop for an obvious refrain. Babies ain’t getting fed steak here; this is raw dog hip hop. Most of the songs aren’t longer than 3 minutes, but they are mostly filled with straight spitting. Suuu!
Next up, Ghostface Killah, AZ, and The Rebel INS all jump on a party rocker together that finds Pretty Toney invigorated like it’s Ironman time again. Nice. But with him raising the energy bar that high, the subdued and laid back wordplay wizardry of Anthony Cruz doesn’t impress as much, only because Ghost Deini being amped on a track is usually the highlight, to the detriment of anyone else on the song. It works well enough, regardless. AZ is still a sick f*cking MC (that Nasir Escobar needs to make an album with). What’s more than enough is hearing Raekwon, Cormega and Sean Price get together to write a threatening lecture. Mega Montana in particular brings the vehicular homicidal rhyme drama:
“Witness savages/ snitching was hazardous/ nowadays shit is embarrassing/ f*ck a flow, this is a lyrical aq..ue… duct”, with that stone jaw Queensbridge slur he spits his bulletproof rhymebook brilliance with. F*cking Corey. You rule. The rib-crushing bassline bobs and weaves in-between the slashing strings and Hollow Bones-huge gunshots that anchor the song to the ocean floor that is the dead rapper disposal for the bodies of the sh*t talkers and haters who doubted these living legends couldn’t still bring the motherf*ckin’ ruckus.
“Cor/ Mega/ raw: forever/ fell back, paused/ fell off? NEVER” Blaow. Verse: dead. Song: murdered. What’s next? Sean Price, on the same beat? Too much awesome hip hop testosterone for one song. The line he walks between comedian and criminal is too edutaining to ever deny. “As you can see, I’m focused/ Boot Camp for life, f*ck the G.I. Joe sh*t”. Somewhere in the middle of the verse, P spits a syllable sandwich that only the best can manage to handle. Sh*t is magic.
The Abbott interludes (like “Fatal Hesitation” and “One Last Question”, among others) are exactly what needs to be done to take this conceptual project from compilation to a remarkable creation. RZA shows that he knows exactly what time it is, even if he isn’t doing anything close to what the rest of the rap game is doing right now. It’s interesting to hear his take on various familiar things, like on “I Wish You Were Here”, where he filters the sample from Consequence and Kanye West’s “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” for the most soulful slice of Wu-Tang street blues since Isaac Hayes blessed “I Can’t Go To Sleep” on the underloved classic The W. Soak it in, it’s marvelous.
No GZA, Masta Killa or Method Man rhyme on Chamber Music unfortunately, but the rest of the fam is here. It will only leave us quenching more on a possible second edition of Chamber Music. Regardless, all members, some members, or no members, if you want that classic Wu-Tang Clan sh*t, it is right here, f*ck the world.
Raekwon talks about his creative process before the meditative murda muzik of “Ill Figures” like the Kool Genius of Rap and Brownsville’s Finest, M.O.P.. There’s not much to say, the song is equal to the sum of its parts. Tons of guns.
And straight up: “Free Like ODB” might be one of the best skits ever made. You gotta hear it. Repeatedly.
Afterwards, Deck ignites the vocabularic havoc on the ground-rumbling “Sound The Horns,” but honestly, he needed to do a bit more editing before he sparked the lettering. His sword isn’t quite as sharp as it used to be, but even with a blunted edge, his words cut into the flesh of the track with conviction. Sadat X comes to life on the second verse and makes greatness out of his Wu collaboration. And Golden Arms perfectly finishes off the majestic massacre that the song moonlights as.
“Enlightened Statues” finds RZA thinking very deeply on the different paths to enlightenment, and the costs of the fuel transporting your spirit from ignorance to elevation. The tabla playing textures and shifty percussion cloaks the snippet in open secrecy, as reverberations drip from RZA’s lisp, shrouding his spontaneous explanations in even more mystery. Almost every skit is somewhat structured like so, and it’s both frustrating and exciting to hear, as you know you won’t understand it all on the first few listens. But alternately, each one immediately connects something, and what you usually get is exceptional intellect.
And before it’s all said and done, the disciples are blessed with a RZA solo called “NYC Crack.” A vocal sample as sweet as Blue Raspberry is stitched in between a trembling, countrified guitar lick and a hovering vibration of dark melody dread, as Robert Diggs updates us on the world according to RZA in 2009. “They only piggyback/ never disrespect/ that Wu-Tang slang is that New York City crack.” Indeed.
The universal Buddha has spoken to the youth and the older gods living the truth. The 90’s was a special time, and assembling all these greats together under the Shaolin Island umbrella is a 2009 highlight to cherish and remember. Wu-Tang forever, motherf*ckers.
The saga continues.
88/100

http://kevinnottingham.com/2009/07/27/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/

-The A to the Z-
07-27-2009, 09:23 AM
I have not listined to this cd yet

would have been much better with the gza, method man, or masta killa on this cd.

Listen to it first, then make judgement.

8
07-27-2009, 11:41 AM
(http://kevinnottingham.com/2009/07/27/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/)http://kevinnottingham.com/2009/07/2...chamber-music/ (http://kevinnottingham.com/2009/07/27/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/) (http://kevinnottingham.com/2009/07/27/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/)
dude's soundin like a fag

benzo
07-27-2009, 11:47 AM
^^^this wouldn't even fill up one side of a casette tape

no replay value whatsoever

anyone notice sultan and keelay disappeared once the album dropped?

man i BEEN saying that Sultan faggot was only here to promote that shit.

Rebel_INS
07-31-2009, 05:47 PM
Definitely a dope album, I really enjoyed it.

Surreptitious
07-31-2009, 07:23 PM
would have been much better with the gza, method man, or masta killa on this cd.

was superior without them but would have been a classic with them on it

Sultan Stringer
08-01-2009, 11:59 AM
gubi snacks

the silencer
08-02-2009, 03:30 PM
I hope RZA realize how much better this has been recieved than some of his other new work, now from http://kevinnottingham.com/


Wu-Tang Clan: Chamber Music



Ominous string instruments. Bootleg kung fu movie samples. Wisdom cautiously spilling from the sealed lips of ancient martial arts masters. Sword strikes. Track titles like “Supreme Architecture” and “Kill Too Hard.” Yes! Just when autotune was declared war upon by the likes of King Jiggamayne, this secret second roundhouse to the loudmouth of rap wackness is released to the masses, and these legendary beasts from the east are unleashed to feast on beats that sound like they were saved from The Flood that almost crumbled The Dream. RZA is damn near the peak of his artistry once again. Pay attention, grasshoppers and hipsters.

The first track naturally is called “Redemption” (peace to Mr. X-citement). Then comes the majestic horns. And then comes some intriguingly relevant vocal samples speaking hip hop history through kung fu commentary. Gotta love it:“It was long ago, but he’s never forgotten that day. nd you’re his only hope to redeem the Clan, and retrieve our army!” “When you learn, you’ll know not to make those mistakes.”
Inspectah Deck rips open the guts of the album, refreshingly sticking to his pistols, instead of trying to keep up with the young guns. Not “For Heaven’s Sake” level, but flashbacks of “the Lone Ranger/ code red: DANGER!” MC that we first fell in love with. It’s been a long time. Wu shouldn’t have left you. Yes, 8 Diagrams wasn’t exactly what most people were looking for, but if you are the kind of head who seeks the vintage sound of the Supreme Shaolin Ceremony Masters of the 90’s, then your wish has been officially granted by the RZArecta. Brooklyn soul band The Revelations also flesh out the fuzzy and dusty but digital grit whipped up in the pyrex pot of Prince Rakeem, embellishing each track with live instrumentation that does nothing but make everything sound much more authentic and fucking awesome. Andrew Kelley, Noah Rubin, and M.O.P.’s Lil’ Fame also provide soundscape support, with Fizzy Womack surprising the most of all, contributing to seven of the album’s seventeen sinister selections. It’s never really clear who actually does what, but it’s clear that what they are all doing collectively, is returning to the feel of the 36th Chamber like it is 1993 all over again, but not rehashing the rap madness that set it all off. They simply carry on tradition like super ninjas on a mission: save 2009 hip hop from bullshit. They succeed with flying colors and bloody shurikens.
So, after Deck gets finished slicing the song open, a gruff ass U-God bodies the beat (I guess RZA and U-God worked that alleged unpaid debt situation out, thank goodness). Then Baby-U passes the mic to… Masta Ace? Ill. And even though Ace’s verse isn’t exactly mindblowing, it’s still lovely to hear these three veterans rhyme together over a moody organ riff and some chunky drums, radioplay be damned. We don’t need no hook, word to Shaq Diesel. Half the songs on this album don’t stop for an obvious refrain. Babies ain’t getting fed steak here; this is raw dog hip hop. Most of the songs aren’t longer than 3 minutes, but they are mostly filled with straight spitting. Suuu!
Next up, Ghostface Killah, AZ, and The Rebel INS all jump on a party rocker together that finds Pretty Toney invigorated like it’s Ironman time again. Nice. But with him raising the energy bar that high, the subdued and laid back wordplay wizardry of Anthony Cruz doesn’t impress as much, only because Ghost Deini being amped on a track is usually the highlight, to the detriment of anyone else on the song. It works well enough, regardless. AZ is still a sick f*cking MC (that Nasir Escobar needs to make an album with). What’s more than enough is hearing Raekwon, Cormega and Sean Price get together to write a threatening lecture. Mega Montana in particular brings the vehicular homicidal rhyme drama:
“Witness savages/ snitching was hazardous/ nowadays shit is embarrassing/ f*ck a flow, this is a lyrical aq..ue… duct”, with that stone jaw Queensbridge slur he spits his bulletproof rhymebook brilliance with. F*cking Corey. You rule. The rib-crushing bassline bobs and weaves in-between the slashing strings and Hollow Bones-huge gunshots that anchor the song to the ocean floor that is the dead rapper disposal for the bodies of the sh*t talkers and haters who doubted these living legends couldn’t still bring the motherf*ckin’ ruckus.
“Cor/ Mega/ raw: forever/ fell back, paused/ fell off? NEVER” Blaow. Verse: dead. Song: murdered. What’s next? Sean Price, on the same beat? Too much awesome hip hop testosterone for one song. The line he walks between comedian and criminal is too edutaining to ever deny. “As you can see, I’m focused/ Boot Camp for life, f*ck the G.I. Joe sh*t”. Somewhere in the middle of the verse, P spits a syllable sandwich that only the best can manage to handle. Sh*t is magic.
The Abbott interludes (like “Fatal Hesitation” and “One Last Question”, among others) are exactly what needs to be done to take this conceptual project from compilation to a remarkable creation. RZA shows that he knows exactly what time it is, even if he isn’t doing anything close to what the rest of the rap game is doing right now. It’s interesting to hear his take on various familiar things, like on “I Wish You Were Here”, where he filters the sample from Consequence and Kanye West’s “The Good, The Bad and The Ugly” for the most soulful slice of Wu-Tang street blues since Isaac Hayes blessed “I Can’t Go To Sleep” on the underloved classic The W. Soak it in, it’s marvelous.
No GZA, Masta Killa or Method Man rhyme on Chamber Music unfortunately, but the rest of the fam is here. It will only leave us quenching more on a possible second edition of Chamber Music. Regardless, all members, some members, or no members, if you want that classic Wu-Tang Clan sh*t, it is right here, f*ck the world.
Raekwon talks about his creative process before the meditative murda muzik of “Ill Figures” like the Kool Genius of Rap and Brownsville’s Finest, M.O.P.. There’s not much to say, the song is equal to the sum of its parts. Tons of guns.
And straight up: “Free Like ODB” might be one of the best skits ever made. You gotta hear it. Repeatedly.
Afterwards, Deck ignites the vocabularic havoc on the ground-rumbling “Sound The Horns,” but honestly, he needed to do a bit more editing before he sparked the lettering. His sword isn’t quite as sharp as it used to be, but even with a blunted edge, his words cut into the flesh of the track with conviction. Sadat X comes to life on the second verse and makes greatness out of his Wu collaboration. And Golden Arms perfectly finishes off the majestic massacre that the song moonlights as.
“Enlightened Statues” finds RZA thinking very deeply on the different paths to enlightenment, and the costs of the fuel transporting your spirit from ignorance to elevation. The tabla playing textures and shifty percussion cloaks the snippet in open secrecy, as reverberations drip from RZA’s lisp, shrouding his spontaneous explanations in even more mystery. Almost every skit is somewhat structured like so, and it’s both frustrating and exciting to hear, as you know you won’t understand it all on the first few listens. But alternately, each one immediately connects something, and what you usually get is exceptional intellect.
And before it’s all said and done, the disciples are blessed with a RZA solo called “NYC Crack.” A vocal sample as sweet as Blue Raspberry is stitched in between a trembling, countrified guitar lick and a hovering vibration of dark melody dread, as Robert Diggs updates us on the world according to RZA in 2009. “They only piggyback/ never disrespect/ that Wu-Tang slang is that New York City crack.” Indeed.
The universal Buddha has spoken to the youth and the older gods living the truth. The 90’s was a special time, and assembling all these greats together under the Shaolin Island umbrella is a 2009 highlight to cherish and remember. Wu-Tang forever, motherf*ckers.
The saga continues.
88/100

http://kevinnottingham.com/2009/07/27/wu-tang-clan-chamber-music/
that was a pretty damn well-written review, WOW

racist randy
08-17-2009, 07:03 PM
1. Redemption

2.Kill Too Hard (Featuring Masta Ace)
I'm feeling the opening verse by Inspectah Deck on here, he starts this off just ripping the mic easily dusting off his sword. The Beat on here is cool, nothing spectacular but nice enough, you can hear how they try to take it back on here with the beat. U-God comes in and sounds like he's fresh off 8 Diagrams, I like his flow control and his lyrics are sharp as fuck. Masta Ace rips this shit with no problem a great guest appearance by him, this is a nice track to start the EP off. 4/5

3.The Abbot
Rza making up excuses for himself.

4.Harbor Masters (Featuring AZ)
This beat really tries to take it back, it's pretty good too, I'm feeling the drums on here, they sound dusty. Ghostface Killah is sound fresh on here with some nice rhymes out the book, AZ adds that extra flavor on this track, there's not much more they could've done with this beat. Inspectah Deck's opening bars are HORRIBLE by Wu-Tang Standards "I'm about to get fly like I'm boarding a jet" straight wack, I hate listening to that, he easily picks himself back up after those lines and ends the track nice and smooth. 4/5

5.Sheep State

6.Radiant Jewels (Featuring Cormega & Sean Price)
This is one of the best IF NOT the best song on the cd. The beat is nice not too calm not too hype and it doesn't try to sound 90's at all. Raekwon starts it off with his mafioso tales keeping you involved on here, he was just the appetizer though. Cormega just destoys this track, this is the best guest verse on this EP, he just says shit that makes you say wtf?? I will be buying his new shit when he decides to drop it. Sean Price ends it nice but your still feeling the after effects of Cormega's verse, not to take anything away from Sean Price's verse because he did rip it, Cormega destroyed it. 4.5/5

7.Supreme Architecture

8.Evil Deeds (Featuring Havoc)
This gets a 4 just off the beat alone, it's just so beautiful especially when the hook comes in. Ghostface Smahsed this beat, he went off on this one "give you an 89' whoopin'" LOL Ghost just starts going off towards the end of this track, he definitely still has his dartz sharp. Rza comes in on the hook and I won't lie, he sounds suspect but it does come out better than I thought it would, only because he's flowing with it, His verse wasn't anything special, he does have that one hot line "my moms put gun powder inside my cimilac" LOL that was nice, his flow sounds choppy which hurts his verse a lil' bit. Havoc kills this shit right here, I like how he just acknowledges Ghostface like Rza isn't on the track, He spits some nice shit, his twitter line is my favorite "I ain't with that Twitter shit, niggaz tryna follow me" so true, just look at these people out here on twitter just itching to know what someone's doing. Anyways back to the song, I like how this was put together, almost flawless, I would've through Raekwon on here instead. 4.5/5

9. Wise Men

10. I Wish You Were Here
This is basically a preview of the new Ghost album, it's ok nothing too special, too much singing for me at the end of the verse which is a turn off for me. 3.5/5

11.Fatal Hesitation

12.Ill Figures (Featuring M.O.P. & Kool G Rap)
I'm feeling this track right here, nice and calm, everyone goes well with each other on here. I'm feeling how Raekwon just kills this verse, with his calm flow, M.O.P. deliver stellar verses and keep the track raw, I like how Kool G Rap kinda goes with Raekwon and keeps it calm on here just flowing on here, I fucks with that. Beat is nice and calm One of my favorite tracks on the album. 4/5

13.Free Like ODB

14.Sound The Horns (Featuring Sadat X)
I'm feeling the up tempo on this track, Horns are great on here, Inspectah Deck starts this off nice with the ill dartz, I'm feeling Sadat X voice and choppy flow on here, it just goes great with this beat "G.O.D. yeah how you gonna block out the sun?" LOL that's my favorite line, U-God's verse sounds like some Dopium material, sounds ok. Nice way to end this one off. 4/5

15.Enlighten Statues

16.NYC Crack (Featuring Thea)
This is an ok track, judging by this track I wouldn't buy another Rza solo, there's nothing really special about this track and Thea is on it sounding horrible as ususal. Beat sounds grimey which is the best part. 3.5/5

17.One Last Question

Pros: Great Guest Spots, they all deliver some great verses MVP goes to cormega of course, Beats are pretty good too, keeps this album sounding kind of raw.

Cons: Too many tracks with Rza talking and not enough actual tracks to even call this an album, that's why I used EP throughout my review, also Meth & Masta Killah would've been nice to hear on this.

Beats: 4/5
Lyrics: 4/5
Overall: 4/5

beautifulrock
08-17-2009, 07:33 PM
16.NYC Crack (Featuring Thea)
This is an ok track, judging by this track I wouldn't buy another Rza solo, there's nothing really special about this track and Thea is on it sounding horrible as ususal. Beat sounds grimey which is the best part. 3.5/5
This is stupid. Stupid lame excuses for hating. Stupid spelling mistakes. (grimy, usual) Stupid logic. I expected nothing less.

racist randy
08-17-2009, 10:04 PM
This is stupid. Stupid lame excuses for hating. Stupid spelling mistakes. (grimy, usual) Stupid logic. I expected nothing less.

Uh Oh, someone's still mad about getting put in their place last month. Anyways so what if i made spelling errors, it happens and I don't like Thea, the track isn't all that hot anyway. I wouldn't call it hating.

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-18-2009, 12:30 PM
i'm not trying to be insulting or disrespectful, but your reviews are amateurishly written and lack any real insight. I mean 'i fucks wit that' 'this track is ok' or 'this shit is wack' is not even worth typing. you should ditch the track-by-track review format and just write a paragraph with your overall impressions; you might be better at that honestly.

Durag
08-21-2009, 03:21 PM
I thought this album was good, the skits were a waste of time, they should have made it an ep as an appitser or something coz there really isnt enough songs to constitue a full album. the songs that are on it are dope though.

and yeah, track by track reviews are gay.

racist randy
08-21-2009, 05:11 PM
i'm not trying to be insulting or disrespectful, but your reviews are amateurishly written and lack any real insight. I mean 'i fucks wit that' 'this track is ok' or 'this shit is wack' is not even worth typing. you should ditch the track-by-track review format and just write a paragraph with your overall impressions; you might be better at that honestly.

I can respect that, but this is my usual format, most people here like it, If you want to look at a paragraph check out Sheepish Lord of Chaos, he's good with those. I just prefer track by track review.

beautifulrock
08-21-2009, 05:46 PM
He's absolutely right about one thing, people on here would rather read a retarded two sentence simplified description than get any real insight or articulation...and as I'm writing this I realize the same people I'm talking about are looking up the word articulation in the online dictionary.

Longbongcilvaringz
09-08-2009, 09:50 AM
I heard nothing about this before it dropped, as i was also banned from here, didn't have the opportunity to check it out.

So i was surprised when i randomly saw in a blog that Wu Tang were releasing another album, and i downloaded it without reading anything about it (whether it was a Clan album or a compilation etc.)

Was very pleasantly surprised.

The numerous skits don't detract from the album for me.

An album of only 8 really good tracks, is always going to be far superior to an album of 22 decent track, to me at least.

I really enjoy the overall sound of the album, and contrary to what someone else said, i think there is a decent amount of sonic variation while maintaining a high level of quality.

I Wish You Were Here could have easily have been turned into a corny and cheesy quasi RnB track much like the majority of Ghosts' previous attempts, but the understated and soulful beat coalesces perfectly with both Tre Williams and Ghosts' vocals. It's a testament to the production on this album that i enjoy this track, as generally i have found the greater Wu Tang Clan attempts at similar track dull, over blown and over cooked.

Hard To Kill is a great opener, after hearing 8D i was a bit concerned that Deck had lost the dynamism that made all of his previous Wu appearances stand out. However, he rhymes on on Chamber Music and OB4CL2 demonstrates a return to form and an over shadowing of any other mc's featured on those albums. Hearing Masta Ace on a beat like this is a pleasure.

After reading most of the reviews here, it seems like most people don't think much of Harbor Masters, but it's probably my favourite track on the album. I think it's an exemplar of the benefits of employing live instruments correctly. It has complex subtlety and a funk which i haven't heard on a Wu record for years. Radiant Jewels is less impressive, but is still a good track in it's own right, the strings almost sound over the top but are just controlled enough. The live bass line is buttery, and Sean Price kills it. Evil Deeds is a similar track, not amazing, but still a pleasant listen. The beat is a little over the top and repetitive for my liking, but the ending is nice.

Ill Figures is one of the best Wu tracks i've heard this decade. Hearing the bass on this through my 70s speakers which make anything sound bass laden, knocked my head off. This kind of downbeat but subtly funky production is the kind of shit i want to hear Wu rhyming over. One of my complaints about OB4CL2 is that a lot of the production is over complicated and as a result comes out superficially sounded ok, but at the same time as almost a jumble of sounds randomly layered. G Rap's verse is short but sweet.

Sound The Horns is probably my least favourite track, because it's sonically too familiar, but i still enjoy it a lot. Sadat X drops probably the only verse on the album i'm not keen on, but he's not terrible. U-God's performance on the entire album makes be interesting in checking out Dopium, not withstanding the mixed reviews. NYC Crack is a great conclusion to the album, again an intelligently constructed beat. There are only 5 or 6 elements, but they complement each other brilliantly and meld together to form a cohesive and dense sonic experience. RZA, in a similar vein to Deck, has sounded tired to me on 8D, but here he rhymes almost as well as he ever has.


Ok, so most people won't really consider this a 'real album'. Personally, i couldn't give a shit what it is/what it is meant to be. Because it's my favourite release by the clan this decade (yes, better than The W). I understand why a lot of fans might not enjoy it, but on a personal level it fulfills my criteria for a great record.

There are too many skits, i would have preferred if it was 11 tracks long, with only a few skits. However, i don't think they really detract from the listening experience to any discernible degree. The full length tracks more than make up for it.

Nothing about the album is 'hard', yet the drums and beats still hit more than much of OB4CL2 in my opinion. There's a dusty crispness to the beats which i really appreciate, and the many times i've blazed listening to the record reinforcing how much i enjoy the production on this album.

To conclude, this is the kind of Wu record which i want to hear coming out, not an attempted emulation of previously released classics, but something that builds upon those releases.

What i rate it is largely irrelevant, quantifying how much a like this is difficult. Since i gave albums like 8D and OB4CL2 scores of 8/10 and 7/10 respectively, this has to be at least higher than those.

8.5/10.

The Hound
09-08-2009, 10:23 AM
16.NYC Crack (Featuring Thea)
This is an ok track, judging by this track I wouldn't buy another Rza solo, there's nothing really special about this track and Thea is on it sounding horrible as ususal. Beat sounds grimey which is the best part. 3.5/5

Ah, the irony of Hollow Dartz being a nit-picking hypocrite is off the chart! This is exactly the kind of shit you have been bitching about endlessly with CL2.

:chef:

Dr. Simon Hurt
09-08-2009, 10:37 AM
Sean: nice review, agreed on the "dusty crispness", and while i still have issues with the length and the attempted deception/padding of the track listing, the album has grown on me alot...playing it with the bass turned up to eurhythmia levels helps alot...i think if the skits were just tacked onto the songs like 'good old days', they wouldn't seem so excessive and would actually fulfill their stated function, which is to give the album continuity...i would rate it a 7, needs about 4-6 more songs, more clan members,more than 3 mcs at most on tracks...if they spent more time on it,it could've been classic.

also,there's no songs on it that make me go nuts, it's merely a collection of adequate-good songs, there needed to be some bangers, spine-tinglers, goose bump moments...as well as songs with actual topics in addition to the "mc wizardry".

oh man, i'm nitpicking...i'm a backpacking nerd stuck in the 90s i guess.

Longbongcilvaringz
09-08-2009, 10:40 AM
Yeah, i think the fact i knew nothing about it promotion wise and didn't read anything about it on here, made me more appreciative of it.

I usually just uncheck the skits in my itunes and listen to it as a 8 track album.

tigermilk
09-18-2009, 10:53 AM
I'm loving this album, just hate the annoying RZA skits where he talks pointless crap. It's got a great selection of beats and rhymes for sure, the guest spots are awesome, but why are there so many when the Clan is strong enough? Anyone else think that if you took the very best 8 Diagram songs and put it with these 8 songs you'd get a brilliant Wu record? That's what I've done on my iPod, shit is wicked!

The blackma
09-18-2009, 06:50 PM
True dope shit, best wu related album of the year. Rza did the same job, he did for supreme clientele, maybe a clue for his future work. I really like this album I am not an "easy lover".

4th Chamber
09-20-2009, 06:23 AM
Superior album. Wish it didn't have skits though. But I deleted them from my iPod, so problem solved!

Dopium486
11-07-2009, 07:39 PM
^ you gotta love rza's laugh on the outro though.

muscularghandi
05-31-2011, 02:40 AM
Album is cool but defenitely not a classic. It's awesome to throw on when you're trying to lay back and relax... if you want to get hyped look elsewhere.

CharlesJones
06-11-2011, 09:36 AM
I heard Chamber Music last week for the first time and it sucks. I was very disappointed but there's some good guest appearances on there.