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Lex Lugor
04-07-2010, 06:50 PM
Been reading these top ten lists all fockin morning



10 Jesse James

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Jesse James married his first cousin Zerelda “Zee” Mimms, who was named after Jesse’s own mother. They had two children and remained married until Jesse’s death in 1882 at the age of 34.










9 Franklin D. Roosevelt

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Although they had met as children, they became reacquainted after a dinner at the White House in 1902 held by Eleanor’s uncle and Franklin’s fifth cousin, President Teddy Roosevelt. FDR was 20 at the time and was attending Harvard. They were married on St. Patrick’s Day, 1905, and had six children.









8 Johann Sebastian Bach

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In 1707 Johann Sebastian Bach married his second cousin on his father’s side, Maria Barbara Bach. She died in 1720. Not much is known about their marriage, but he remarried less than two years after her death.









7 H.G. Wells

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H.G. Wells first cousin Isabel Mary Wells, who he left after only three years. Wells was an English writer most famous today for the science fiction novels he published between 1895 and 1901: The Time Machine, The Island of Doctor Moreau, The Invisible Man, The War of the Worlds, When the Sleeper Wakes, and The First Men in the Moon.









6 Thomas Jefferson

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Thomas Jefferson married his third cousin Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson in 1772. They had six children together. Martha died on September 6, 1782 and Jefferson never remarried.










5 Albert Einstein

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Albert married his second cousin Elsa in 1919, not too long after his divorce from his first wife Mileva. Elsa died in 1936 due to various health problems, and though Albert never married again he had several girlfriends until his death in 1955.









4 Charles Darwin

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All natural selection jokes aside, the man who popularized the theory of evolution married his first cousin Emma Wedgwood. They had a total of ten children. Darwin died in 1882.









3 Edgar Allan Poe

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At the age of 20 poet Edgar Allen Poe moved in with his aunt, uncle, and cousin after his father left and his mother had died. It was there in Baltimore that he met his seven year old cousin Virginia, who he fell in love with and married when she was only thirteen. She died eighteen years later in 1847, and Poe died only two years after Virginia’s death.









2 Jerry Lee Lewis

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In 1957 famous rock and roll musician Jerry Lee Lewis married his cousin Myra, who was only 13 at the time. He lost an incredible amount of respect and credibility. The marriage almost ended his career and caused him to move from rock to a more country style. They had two children together, and ended up divorced in 1970. [Image: Jerry Lee Lewis and his Wife Myra]









1 Rudy Giuliani

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Governor Rudy Giuliani married a woman who he thought to be his third cousin, Regina Peruggi, in 1968. It wasn’t until many years later that they realized that they were actually second cousins. Regina and Rudy divorced in 1982, and Rudy married his second wife Donna Hanover in 1984.

Lex Lugor
04-07-2010, 06:53 PM
I got a really hot second cousin so...

TheBoarzHeadBoy
04-07-2010, 06:56 PM
It's not really an issue. I think it's only really a taboo to marry child to parent or siblings. First cousins and farther apart cousins isn't going to create a retard child, and thus why is there a problem. The only issue is complicating family trees :)

DiGitalChamberz
04-07-2010, 08:26 PM
damn i woulda never guessed they were all white wow

i mean not that that has anything to do with it (cough) just saying

Queen Of Poetry
04-07-2010, 08:38 PM
White folks man. I ain't never look at a cousin and thought damn I wanna fuck him. Eeww.

Art Vandelay
04-07-2010, 08:40 PM


did you ever look at one of your cousins and think "i wanna fuck her"

DiGitalChamberz
04-07-2010, 08:43 PM
"damn yo......... if only she wasnt ma cuzin"

Queen Of Poetry
04-07-2010, 08:46 PM


did you ever look at one of your cousins and think "i wanna fuck her"

I have. U know college days, u experiment and then take it to the reunion and after a few blunts and beers........














NO I didn't!!!!!!!! Ur a hot mess.

UNCLE RUCKUS
04-07-2010, 08:57 PM
White folks man. I ain't never look at a cousin and thought damn I wanna fuck him. Eeww.

its not just white folks smfh
Africa

Cousin marriage rates from most African nations outside the Middle East are unknown. It is however estimated that 35-50% of all sub-Saharan African populations either prefer or accept cousin marriages.[39] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-38) In Nigeria, the most populous country of Africa, the three largest tribes in order of size are the Hausa (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Hausa_people), Yoruba (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Yoruba_people), and Igbo (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Igbo).[40] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-39) The Hausa are overwhelmingly Muslim, though followers of traditional religions do exist. Muslim Hausa practice cousin marriage preferentially, and polygyny is allowed if the husband can support multiple wives.[41] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-40) The book Baba of Karo (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Baba_of_Karo) presents one prominent portrayal of Hausa life: according to its English coauthor, it is unknown for Hausa women to be unmarried for any great length of time after around the age of fourteen.[42] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-41) Divorce can be accomplished easily by either the male or the female, but females must then remarry.[43] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-42) Even for a man, lacking a spouse is looked down upon.[44] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-43) Baba of Karo's first of four marriages was to her second cousin. She recounts in the book that her good friend married the friend's first cross cousin.[45] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-44)
The Yoruba people are split between Islam and Christianity.[46] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-45) A 1974 study analyzed Yoruba marriages in the town Oka Akoko, finding that among a sample of highly polygynous marriages having an average of about three wives, 51% of all pairings were consanguineous. These included not only cousin marriages but also uncle-niece unions. Reportedly it is a custom that in such marriages at least one spouse must be a relative, and generally such spouses were the preferred or favorite wives in the marriage and gave birth to more children. However, it must be emphasized that this was not a general study of Yoruba, but only of highly polygynous Yoruba residing in Oka Akoko.[47] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-46) Finally, the Igbo people of southern Nigeria specifically prohibit both parallel- and cross-cousin marriage, though polygyny is common. Men are forbidden to marry within their own patrilineage or those of their mother or father's mother and must marry outside their own village. Igbo are almost entirely Christian, having converted heavily under colonialism.[48] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-47)
In Ethiopia the ruling Christian Amhara (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Amhara) people were historically rigidly opposed to cousin marriage, and could consider up to third cousins the equivalent of brother and sister, with marriage at least ostensibly prohibited out to sixth cousins.[49] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-48) They also took affinal prohibitions very seriously. The prospect of a man marrying a former wife's "sister" was seen as incest, and conversely for a woman and her former husband's "brother."[50] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-49) Though Muslims make up over a third of the Ethiopian population, and Islam has been present in the country since the time of Muhammad, cross-cousin marriage is very rare among most Ethiopian Muslims.[51] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-50) In contrast to the Nigerian situation, in Ethiopia Islam cannot be identified with particular tribal groups and is found across most of them, and conversions between religions are comparatively common.[52] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-51) But exceptions to these rules include the overwhelmingly Muslim Somali and Afar peoples, who respectively make up 6.2% and 1.73% of the population.[53] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-52) The Afar practice a form of cousin marriage called absuma that is arranged at birth and can be forced.[54] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-53)
China

Further information: Chinese marriage (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Chinese_marriage)
Confucius described marriage as "the union of two surnames, in friendship and in love."[55] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-54) In ancient China there is evidence that in some cases two clans had a longstanding arrangement wherein they would only marry members of the other clan. Some men also practiced sororate marriage, that is, a marriage to a former wife's sister or a polygynous marriage to both sisters. This would have the effect of eliminating parallel-cousin marriage as an option but would leave cross-cousin marriage acceptable.[56] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-55) In the ancient system of the Erya (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Erya) dating from around the 3rd century B.C., the words for the two types of cross cousins were identical, with father's brother's children and mother's sister's children both being distinct.[57] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-56) However, it is evident that whereas it may not have been permissible at that time, marriage with the mother's sister's children also became possible by the third century A.D.[58] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-57) Eventually the mother's sister's children and cross cousins shared one set of terms, with only the father's brother's children retaining a separate set.[59] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-58) This usage remains today, with biao cousins considered "outside" and paternal tang cousins being of the same house.[60] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-59) There were also some periods in Chinese history where all cousin marriage was legally prohibited, as law codes dating from the Ming Dynasty attest. However, enforcement proved difficult and by the subsequent Qing Dynasty the former laws had been restored.[61] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Feng_1967.2C_p._43-60)
The following is a Chinese poem by Po Chu-yi (A.D. 772-846).[62] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Chen_1932.2C_p._630-61)
In Ku-feng hsien, in the district of Ch'u chou [Kiangsu]Is a village called Chu Ch'en [the names of the two clans].There are only two clans thereWhich have intermarried for many generations.Anthropologist Francis Hsu described mother's brother's daughter as being the most preferred type of Chinese cousin marriage, mother's sister's daughter as being tolerated, and father's sister's daughter (FZD) as being disfavored.[63] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-62) Some writers report this last form as being nearly incestuous.[64] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-ReferenceB-63) One proposed explanation is that in FZD marriage the daughter does not change her surname throughout her life, so the marriage does not result in an extension of the father's kinship ties. In Chinese culture these patrilineal ties are most important in determining the closeness of a relation.[65] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-64) In the case of the MZD marriage there are no such ties and consequently this may not even be viewed as cousin marriage. Finally, one reason that MBD marriage is often most common may be the typically greater emotional warmth between a man and his mother's side of the family.[66] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-65) It should be noted that later analyses have found regional variation in these patterns: in some rural areas where cousin marriage is still common, MBD is not preferred but merely acceptable, similar to MZD.[64] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-ReferenceB-63) By the early to mid-twentieth century, anthropologists described cross-cousin marriage in China as "still permissible...but...generally obsolete" or as "permitted but not encouraged."[61] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Feng_1967.2C_p._43-60)[62] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Chen_1932.2C_p._630-61)
Current status

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/02/CousinMarriageWorld.svg/400px-CousinMarriageWorld.svg.png (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/File:CousinMarriageWorld.svg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/File:CousinMarriageWorld.svg)
Laws regarding first-cousin marriage around the world1 First-cousin marriage Legality dependent on religion or culture2 Statute bans first-cousin marriage No data 1For information on US states see the map below.
2See sections on India (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Cousin_marriage#India) and Hinduism (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Cousin_marriage#Hinduism).



Slightly over 10% of all marriages worldwide are estimated to be between second cousins or closer.[2] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-kershaw-1) As of 2001, here is one estimate for the percentages of world population living in countries with various levels of consanguineous marriage: less than 1% consanguinity, 18%, 1-10% consanguinity, 47%, 10-50+% consanguinity, 17%, and unknown, 18%.[17] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-bittles1-16) The overall rate appears to be declining.[24] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-ReferenceA-23)
Middle East

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6c/Wiki_letter_w.svg/20px-Wiki_letter_w.svg.png (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/File:Wiki_letter_w.svg)This section requires expansion (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cousin_marriage&action=edit) with:
more information on specific countries.
The Middle East has uniquely high rates of cousin marriage among the world's regions. Certain Middle Eastern countries, including Pakistan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Pakistan) and Saudi Arabia (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Saudi_Arabia), have rates of marriage to first or second cousins that may exceed 50%.[3] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-map-2) Iraq (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Iraq) was estimated in one study to have a rate of 33%,[67] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-asia-66) and figures for Iran (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Iran) and Afghanistan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Afghanistan) have been estimated in the range of 30-40%.[3] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-map-2) Though on the lower end, Egypt (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Egypt) and Turkey (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Turkey) nevertheless have rates above 20%.[67] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-asia-66)
All states in the Persian Gulf currently require advance genetic screening for all prospective married couples. Qatar was the last Gulf nation to institute mandatory screening in 2009, mainly to warn related couples who are planning marriage about any genetic risks they may face. The current rate of cousin marriage there is 54%, an increase of 12-18% over the previous generation.[68] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-67) A report by the Dubai-based Centre for Arab Genomic Studies (CAGS) in September 2009 found that Arabs have one of the world's highest rates of genetic disorders, nearly two-thirds of which are linked to consanguinity. Research from CAGS and others suggests consanguinity is declining in Lebanon (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Lebanon) and Egypt (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Egypt) and among Palestinians (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Palestinians), but is increasing in Morocco (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Morocco), Mauritania (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Mauritania) and Sudan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Sudan).[15] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-The_National_2009-14)
Dr. Ahmad Teebi, a genetics and pediatrics professor at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, links the increase in cousin marriage in Qatar and other Gulf states to tribal tradition and the region’s expanding economies. “Rich families tend to marry rich families, and from their own – and the rich like to protect their wealth,” he said. “So it’s partly economic, and it’s also partly cultural.” In regard to the higher rates of genetic disease in these societies, he says: "It's certainly a problem," but also that "The issue here is not the cousin marriage, the issue here is to avoid the disease."[15] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-The_National_2009-14)
In Pakistan there is the concept of biradari or "brotherhood," whose members may or may not be related. Each biradari usually has an associated caste (zat (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Caste_system_among_South_Asian_Muslims)) name. It has been proposed that one of the features underlying cousin marriage in Pakistan is caste endogamy (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Endogamy). According to this interpretation, marrying within the extended family allows Muslim Pakistanis to maintain caste differences while differentiating themselves from the exogamous Hindus of neighboring North India.[69] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-68)
In many Middle Eastern nations a marriage to the father's brother's daughter (FBD) is considered ideal, though this type may not always actually outnumber other types.[70] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-69) One anthropologist, Ladislav Holý, argues that it is important to distinguish between the ideal of FBD marriage and marriage as it is actually practiced, which always also includes other types of cousins and unrelated spouses. Holý cites the Berti people of the Sudan, who consider the FBD to be the closest kinswoman to a man outside of the prohibited range. If there is more than one relationship between spouses, as often results from successive generations of cousin marriage, only the patrilineal one is counted. Marriage within the lineage is preferred to marriage outside the lineage even when no exact genealogical relationship is known. Of 277 first marriages, only 84 were between couples unable to trace any genealogical relationship between them. Of those, in 64 the spouses were of the same lineage. However, of 85 marriages to a second or third wife, in 60 the spouses were of different lineages.[71] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-70)[72] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-71) The Marri (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Marri) have a very limited set of incest prohibitions that includes only lineal relatives, the sister, and aunts except the mother's brother's wife. Female members of the mother's lineage are seen as only loosely related. Finally there are the Baggara (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Baggara) Arabs who favor MBD marriage first, followed by cross-cousin marriage if the cross cousin is a member of the same surra, a group of agnates of five or six generations depth. Next is marriage within the surra. There is no preference for marriages between matrilateral parallel cousins.
India

Attitudes in India on cousin marriage vary sharply by region and culture. For Muslims it is acceptable and legal to marry a first cousin. But for Hindus it may be illegal under the 1955 Hindu Marriage Act (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Hindu_Marriage_Act), though the specific situation is more complex. The Hindu Marriage Act makes cousin marriage illegal for Hindus with the exception of marriages permitted by regional custom.[73] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-indiasocialstructure-72) Practices of the small Christian minority are also location dependent: their cousin marriage rates are higher in southern states like Karnataka (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Karnataka) with high overall rates.[74] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-73)
Cousin marriage is proscribed and seen as incest for Hindus in north India. In fact it may even be unacceptable to marry within one's village or for two siblings to marry partners from the same village.[75] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-74) The northern kinship model prevails in the states of Rajasthan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Rajasthan), Gujarat (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Gujarat), Uttar Pradesh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Uttar_Pradesh), Haryana (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Haryana), and Punjab (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Punjab_(India)). But in south India it is common for Hindu cross cousins to marry, with matrilateral (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Matrilateral) cross-cousin (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Cross-cousin) (mother's brother's daughter) marriages being especially favored.[76] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-75) The southern kinship model prevails in the states of Kerala (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Kerala), Tamil Nadu (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Tamil_Nadu), Karnataka (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Karnataka), and Andhra Pradesh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Andhra_Pradesh). South Indian women have been described as having more personal autonomy than North Indian women[77] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-76) and a kinship system leaving women closer to their families of origin and not based on patrilineal descent may explain both this and somewhat lower South Indian birth rates. In the exogamous north, a woman will not usually be in a position to help her family after marriage, since the house of her husband is likely to be far away. Female children are consequently less valued. In the South Indian system males are also likely to enter into arrangements that include males related by marriage, whereas in the north such relationships are more defined by blood ties.[78] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-77) But the higher the caste in south India, in general the closer the position of females is to that under the northern system.[79] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-78)
Practices in central India overall are closer to the northern model than the southern,[80] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-79) but differences exist from each. For example, in Mumbai (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Mumbai), studies done in 1956 showed 7.7% of Hindus married to a second cousin or closer. By contrast, in the northern city of New Delhi (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/New_Delhi) only 0.1% of Hindus were married to a first cousin during the 1980s. At the other extreme, studies done in the South Indian province of Karnataka, which contains Bangalore (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Bangalore), during that period show fully one third of Hindus married to a second cousin or closer.[81] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-tables-80) Pre-2000 Madhya Pradesh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Madhya_Pradesh), from which Chhattisgarh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Chhattisgarh) has now split, and Maharashtra (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Maharashtra), which contains Mumbai, are provinces that are intermediate in their kinship practices.
India's Muslim minority represents about 12% of its population (excluding Jammu and Kashmir) and has an overall rate of cousin marriage of 22% according to a 2000 report. Most Muslim cousin marriages were between first cousins, with the rate of first-cousin marriage being 20%. Muslim consanguinity in north India was typical, but below the overall northern statistic lies a sharply divided picture: Jammu and Kashmir is the only Indian state with a Muslim majority, with a Muslim consanguinity rate of 40%, while at the other extreme Haryana, though its population is 17% Muslim,[82] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-81) has a Muslim consanguinity rate of only 1%. This dichotomy may be a legacy of the partition of the sub-continent into India and Pakistan, when there was substantial Muslim migration to Pakistan from the eastern parts of the former unified state of Punjab. In south India by contrast the rates are fairly constant, except for the South Indian Malabar Muslims of Kerala (9%) who claim descent from Arab traders who settled permanently in India in the 8th century. Most Indian Muslims by contrast are the result of Hindu conversions to Islam in the 16th century or later. The lowest rate for a whole Indian region was in East India (15%). Consanguinity rates were generally stable across the four decades for which data exists, though second-cousin marriage appears to have been decreasing in favor of first-cousin marriage.[16] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Bittles_2000-15)

Visionz
04-07-2010, 09:56 PM
It's not really an issue. I think it's only really a taboo to marry child to parent or siblings. First cousins and farther apart cousins isn't going to create a retard child, and thus why is there a problem. The only issue is complicating family trees :)
any cousins is sick but mufuckin first cousins man, I bet you're playing russian roulette on some three-toed babies. Your parents are brothers/sisters. There's no way to rationalize that shit, its fuckin gross :r

Olive Oil Goombah
04-07-2010, 10:18 PM
i mean, dont marry em or have kids..come on now...

TSA
04-08-2010, 01:03 AM
LOL at the nigeria stats. lol at igbo ppl being polygamous, no they're not wtf

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 08:08 AM
its not just white folks smfh
Africa

Cousin marriage rates from most African nations outside the Middle East are unknown. It is however estimated that 35-50% of all sub-Saharan African populations either prefer or accept cousin marriages.[39] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-38) In Nigeria, the most populous country of Africa, the three largest tribes in order of size are the Hausa (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Hausa_people), Yoruba (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Yoruba_people), and Igbo (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Igbo).[40] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-39) The Hausa are overwhelmingly Muslim, though followers of traditional religions do exist. Muslim Hausa practice cousin marriage preferentially, and polygyny is allowed if the husband can support multiple wives.[41] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-40) The book Baba of Karo (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Baba_of_Karo) presents one prominent portrayal of Hausa life: according to its English coauthor, it is unknown for Hausa women to be unmarried for any great length of time after around the age of fourteen.[42] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-41) Divorce can be accomplished easily by either the male or the female, but females must then remarry.[43] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-42) Even for a man, lacking a spouse is looked down upon.[44] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-43) Baba of Karo's first of four marriages was to her second cousin. She recounts in the book that her good friend married the friend's first cross cousin.[45] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-44)
The Yoruba people are split between Islam and Christianity.[46] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-45) A 1974 study analyzed Yoruba marriages in the town Oka Akoko, finding that among a sample of highly polygynous marriages having an average of about three wives, 51% of all pairings were consanguineous. These included not only cousin marriages but also uncle-niece unions. Reportedly it is a custom that in such marriages at least one spouse must be a relative, and generally such spouses were the preferred or favorite wives in the marriage and gave birth to more children. However, it must be emphasized that this was not a general study of Yoruba, but only of highly polygynous Yoruba residing in Oka Akoko.[47] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-46) Finally, the Igbo people of southern Nigeria specifically prohibit both parallel- and cross-cousin marriage, though polygyny is common. Men are forbidden to marry within their own patrilineage or those of their mother or father's mother and must marry outside their own village. Igbo are almost entirely Christian, having converted heavily under colonialism.[48] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-47)
In Ethiopia the ruling Christian Amhara (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Amhara) people were historically rigidly opposed to cousin marriage, and could consider up to third cousins the equivalent of brother and sister, with marriage at least ostensibly prohibited out to sixth cousins.[49] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-48) They also took affinal prohibitions very seriously. The prospect of a man marrying a former wife's "sister" was seen as incest, and conversely for a woman and her former husband's "brother."[50] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-49) Though Muslims make up over a third of the Ethiopian population, and Islam has been present in the country since the time of Muhammad, cross-cousin marriage is very rare among most Ethiopian Muslims.[51] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-50) In contrast to the Nigerian situation, in Ethiopia Islam cannot be identified with particular tribal groups and is found across most of them, and conversions between religions are comparatively common.[52] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-51) But exceptions to these rules include the overwhelmingly Muslim Somali and Afar peoples, who respectively make up 6.2% and 1.73% of the population.[53] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-52) The Afar practice a form of cousin marriage called absuma that is arranged at birth and can be forced.[54] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-53)
China

Further information: Chinese marriage (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Chinese_marriage)
Confucius described marriage as "the union of two surnames, in friendship and in love."[55] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-54) In ancient China there is evidence that in some cases two clans had a longstanding arrangement wherein they would only marry members of the other clan. Some men also practiced sororate marriage, that is, a marriage to a former wife's sister or a polygynous marriage to both sisters. This would have the effect of eliminating parallel-cousin marriage as an option but would leave cross-cousin marriage acceptable.[56] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-55) In the ancient system of the Erya (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Erya) dating from around the 3rd century B.C., the words for the two types of cross cousins were identical, with father's brother's children and mother's sister's children both being distinct.[57] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-56) However, it is evident that whereas it may not have been permissible at that time, marriage with the mother's sister's children also became possible by the third century A.D.[58] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-57) Eventually the mother's sister's children and cross cousins shared one set of terms, with only the father's brother's children retaining a separate set.[59] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-58) This usage remains today, with biao cousins considered "outside" and paternal tang cousins being of the same house.[60] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-59) There were also some periods in Chinese history where all cousin marriage was legally prohibited, as law codes dating from the Ming Dynasty attest. However, enforcement proved difficult and by the subsequent Qing Dynasty the former laws had been restored.[61] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Feng_1967.2C_p._43-60)
The following is a Chinese poem by Po Chu-yi (A.D. 772-846).[62] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Chen_1932.2C_p._630-61)In Ku-feng hsien, in the district of Ch'u chou [Kiangsu]Is a village called Chu Ch'en [the names of the two clans].There are only two clans thereWhich have intermarried for many generations.Anthropologist Francis Hsu described mother's brother's daughter as being the most preferred type of Chinese cousin marriage, mother's sister's daughter as being tolerated, and father's sister's daughter (FZD) as being disfavored.[63] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-62) Some writers report this last form as being nearly incestuous.[64] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-ReferenceB-63) One proposed explanation is that in FZD marriage the daughter does not change her surname throughout her life, so the marriage does not result in an extension of the father's kinship ties. In Chinese culture these patrilineal ties are most important in determining the closeness of a relation.[65] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-64) In the case of the MZD marriage there are no such ties and consequently this may not even be viewed as cousin marriage. Finally, one reason that MBD marriage is often most common may be the typically greater emotional warmth between a man and his mother's side of the family.[66] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-65) It should be noted that later analyses have found regional variation in these patterns: in some rural areas where cousin marriage is still common, MBD is not preferred but merely acceptable, similar to MZD.[64] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-ReferenceB-63) By the early to mid-twentieth century, anthropologists described cross-cousin marriage in China as "still permissible...but...generally obsolete" or as "permitted but not encouraged."[61] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Feng_1967.2C_p._43-60)[62] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Chen_1932.2C_p._630-61)
Current status

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/0/02/CousinMarriageWorld.svg/400px-CousinMarriageWorld.svg.png (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/File:CousinMarriageWorld.svg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.5/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/File:CousinMarriageWorld.svg)
Laws regarding first-cousin marriage around the world1 First-cousin marriage Legality dependent on religion or culture2 Statute bans first-cousin marriage No data 1For information on US states see the map below.
2See sections on India (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Cousin_marriage#India) and Hinduism (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Cousin_marriage#Hinduism).



Slightly over 10% of all marriages worldwide are estimated to be between second cousins or closer.[2] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-kershaw-1) As of 2001, here is one estimate for the percentages of world population living in countries with various levels of consanguineous marriage: less than 1% consanguinity, 18%, 1-10% consanguinity, 47%, 10-50+% consanguinity, 17%, and unknown, 18%.[17] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-bittles1-16) The overall rate appears to be declining.[24] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-ReferenceA-23)
Middle East

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/6c/Wiki_letter_w.svg/20px-Wiki_letter_w.svg.png (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/File:Wiki_letter_w.svg)This section requires expansion (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Cousin_marriage&action=edit) with:
more information on specific countries.
The Middle East has uniquely high rates of cousin marriage among the world's regions. Certain Middle Eastern countries, including Pakistan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Pakistan) and Saudi Arabia (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Saudi_Arabia), have rates of marriage to first or second cousins that may exceed 50%.[3] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-map-2) Iraq (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Iraq) was estimated in one study to have a rate of 33%,[67] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-asia-66) and figures for Iran (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Iran) and Afghanistan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Afghanistan) have been estimated in the range of 30-40%.[3] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-map-2) Though on the lower end, Egypt (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Egypt) and Turkey (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Turkey) nevertheless have rates above 20%.[67] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-asia-66)
All states in the Persian Gulf currently require advance genetic screening for all prospective married couples. Qatar was the last Gulf nation to institute mandatory screening in 2009, mainly to warn related couples who are planning marriage about any genetic risks they may face. The current rate of cousin marriage there is 54%, an increase of 12-18% over the previous generation.[68] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-67) A report by the Dubai-based Centre for Arab Genomic Studies (CAGS) in September 2009 found that Arabs have one of the world's highest rates of genetic disorders, nearly two-thirds of which are linked to consanguinity. Research from CAGS and others suggests consanguinity is declining in Lebanon (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Lebanon) and Egypt (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Egypt) and among Palestinians (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Palestinians), but is increasing in Morocco (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Morocco), Mauritania (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Mauritania) and Sudan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Sudan).[15] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-The_National_2009-14)
Dr. Ahmad Teebi, a genetics and pediatrics professor at Weill Cornell Medical College in Qatar, links the increase in cousin marriage in Qatar and other Gulf states to tribal tradition and the region’s expanding economies. “Rich families tend to marry rich families, and from their own – and the rich like to protect their wealth,” he said. “So it’s partly economic, and it’s also partly cultural.” In regard to the higher rates of genetic disease in these societies, he says: "It's certainly a problem," but also that "The issue here is not the cousin marriage, the issue here is to avoid the disease."[15] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-The_National_2009-14)
In Pakistan there is the concept of biradari or "brotherhood," whose members may or may not be related. Each biradari usually has an associated caste (zat (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Caste_system_among_South_Asian_Muslims)) name. It has been proposed that one of the features underlying cousin marriage in Pakistan is caste endogamy (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Endogamy). According to this interpretation, marrying within the extended family allows Muslim Pakistanis to maintain caste differences while differentiating themselves from the exogamous Hindus of neighboring North India.[69] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-68)
In many Middle Eastern nations a marriage to the father's brother's daughter (FBD) is considered ideal, though this type may not always actually outnumber other types.[70] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-69) One anthropologist, Ladislav Holý, argues that it is important to distinguish between the ideal of FBD marriage and marriage as it is actually practiced, which always also includes other types of cousins and unrelated spouses. Holý cites the Berti people of the Sudan, who consider the FBD to be the closest kinswoman to a man outside of the prohibited range. If there is more than one relationship between spouses, as often results from successive generations of cousin marriage, only the patrilineal one is counted. Marriage within the lineage is preferred to marriage outside the lineage even when no exact genealogical relationship is known. Of 277 first marriages, only 84 were between couples unable to trace any genealogical relationship between them. Of those, in 64 the spouses were of the same lineage. However, of 85 marriages to a second or third wife, in 60 the spouses were of different lineages.[71] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-70)[72] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-71) The Marri (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Marri) have a very limited set of incest prohibitions that includes only lineal relatives, the sister, and aunts except the mother's brother's wife. Female members of the mother's lineage are seen as only loosely related. Finally there are the Baggara (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Baggara) Arabs who favor MBD marriage first, followed by cross-cousin marriage if the cross cousin is a member of the same surra, a group of agnates of five or six generations depth. Next is marriage within the surra. There is no preference for marriages between matrilateral parallel cousins.
India

Attitudes in India on cousin marriage vary sharply by region and culture. For Muslims it is acceptable and legal to marry a first cousin. But for Hindus it may be illegal under the 1955 Hindu Marriage Act (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Hindu_Marriage_Act), though the specific situation is more complex. The Hindu Marriage Act makes cousin marriage illegal for Hindus with the exception of marriages permitted by regional custom.[73] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-indiasocialstructure-72) Practices of the small Christian minority are also location dependent: their cousin marriage rates are higher in southern states like Karnataka (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Karnataka) with high overall rates.[74] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-73)
Cousin marriage is proscribed and seen as incest for Hindus in north India. In fact it may even be unacceptable to marry within one's village or for two siblings to marry partners from the same village.[75] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-74) The northern kinship model prevails in the states of Rajasthan (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Rajasthan), Gujarat (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Gujarat), Uttar Pradesh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Uttar_Pradesh), Haryana (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Haryana), and Punjab (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Punjab_%28India%29). But in south India it is common for Hindu cross cousins to marry, with matrilateral (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Matrilateral) cross-cousin (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Cross-cousin) (mother's brother's daughter) marriages being especially favored.[76] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-75) The southern kinship model prevails in the states of Kerala (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Kerala), Tamil Nadu (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Tamil_Nadu), Karnataka (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Karnataka), and Andhra Pradesh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Andhra_Pradesh). South Indian women have been described as having more personal autonomy than North Indian women[77] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-76) and a kinship system leaving women closer to their families of origin and not based on patrilineal descent may explain both this and somewhat lower South Indian birth rates. In the exogamous north, a woman will not usually be in a position to help her family after marriage, since the house of her husband is likely to be far away. Female children are consequently less valued. In the South Indian system males are also likely to enter into arrangements that include males related by marriage, whereas in the north such relationships are more defined by blood ties.[78] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-77) But the higher the caste in south India, in general the closer the position of females is to that under the northern system.[79] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-78)
Practices in central India overall are closer to the northern model than the southern,[80] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-79) but differences exist from each. For example, in Mumbai (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Mumbai), studies done in 1956 showed 7.7% of Hindus married to a second cousin or closer. By contrast, in the northern city of New Delhi (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/New_Delhi) only 0.1% of Hindus were married to a first cousin during the 1980s. At the other extreme, studies done in the South Indian province of Karnataka, which contains Bangalore (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Bangalore), during that period show fully one third of Hindus married to a second cousin or closer.[81] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-tables-80) Pre-2000 Madhya Pradesh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Madhya_Pradesh), from which Chhattisgarh (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Chhattisgarh) has now split, and Maharashtra (http://www.wutang-corp.com/wiki/Maharashtra), which contains Mumbai, are provinces that are intermediate in their kinship practices.
India's Muslim minority represents about 12% of its population (excluding Jammu and Kashmir) and has an overall rate of cousin marriage of 22% according to a 2000 report. Most Muslim cousin marriages were between first cousins, with the rate of first-cousin marriage being 20%. Muslim consanguinity in north India was typical, but below the overall northern statistic lies a sharply divided picture: Jammu and Kashmir is the only Indian state with a Muslim majority, with a Muslim consanguinity rate of 40%, while at the other extreme Haryana, though its population is 17% Muslim,[82] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-81) has a Muslim consanguinity rate of only 1%. This dichotomy may be a legacy of the partition of the sub-continent into India and Pakistan, when there was substantial Muslim migration to Pakistan from the eastern parts of the former unified state of Punjab. In south India by contrast the rates are fairly constant, except for the South Indian Malabar Muslims of Kerala (9%) who claim descent from Arab traders who settled permanently in India in the 8th century. Most Indian Muslims by contrast are the result of Hindu conversions to Islam in the 16th century or later. The lowest rate for a whole Indian region was in East India (15%). Consanguinity rates were generally stable across the four decades for which data exists, though second-cousin marriage appears to have been decreasing in favor of first-cousin marriage.[16] (http://www.wutang-corp.com/forum/#cite_note-Bittles_2000-15)


U got any info on black folks on the U.S.? I mean the thread starter showed folks in the U.S. not in other countries.............

Art Vandelay
04-08-2010, 11:01 AM
U got any info on black folks on the U.S.? I mean the thread starter showed folks in the U.S. not in other countries.............

wow, you're really interested in incest, queen. Kinky!!

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 11:05 AM
wow, you're really interested in incest, queen. Kinky!!


Ha. Ummm no but he quoted me and then said not just white folks so...........just sayin


Ur a hot mess!

Art Vandelay
04-08-2010, 11:07 AM
queen, i'm into role playing. i'll pretend to be your brother if you want

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 11:10 AM
queen, i'm into role playing. i'll pretend to be your brother if you want


Ha! How bout my grandpa????? Old is in..........

Art Vandelay
04-08-2010, 11:12 AM
my balls do hang a little low...

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 11:13 AM
my balls do hang a little low...


Eeww ok TMI!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Art Vandelay
04-08-2010, 11:20 AM
so what did you and your grandpa do when you used to have sex with him. i want our role playing to be accurate

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 11:58 AM
Eeww I was jokin..........u dirty bird.

Art Vandelay
04-08-2010, 12:10 PM
did your grandpa ever give you a gummer?

netscape check two
04-08-2010, 04:40 PM
White folks man. I ain't never look at a cousin and thought damn I wanna fuck him. Eeww.

The non white folk might have been too busy shooting their cousins to sleep with them. :{

TheBoarzHeadBoy
04-08-2010, 04:56 PM
Iy's not that big of a deal. Half Siblings if I recall correctly are unlikely to have any genetic issues, so I don't think cousins are the taboo that you all think they are. But I don't have any female cousins (I have like a dozen male first cousins) so I couldn't tell you if I'm attracted to them because I don't have the temptation...

Art Vandelay
04-08-2010, 04:59 PM


but are you attracted to any of your half siblings?

netscape check two
04-08-2010, 05:02 PM
lol @ 'The marriage almost ended his career and caused him to move from rock to a more country style.'

I guess country music isn't as critical toward relatives marrying each other. What a surprise.

begongo
04-08-2010, 06:41 PM
damn i woulda never guessed they were all white wow

i mean not that that has anything to do with it (cough) just sayinghow many globally known non-white people before the 70's can u name?

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 08:15 PM
The non white folk might have been too busy shooting their cousins to sleep with them. :{


Not necessary...........

netscape check two
04-08-2010, 09:24 PM
Your statement wasn't either.

Queen Of Poetry
04-08-2010, 09:29 PM
Come on son. check for real? All the racist shit on here and u gonna call me out? I've been called nigger bitch and I make a comment and......it's cool.

LoTec
04-09-2010, 01:58 AM
My great grandmother after have children with her first husband (which is my grandmas father) married her first cousin and sired two or three kids I think. And they all turned out ok. lol