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View Full Version : Should I consider restoring a Car?


TheBoarzHeadBoy
04-27-2010, 03:13 PM
My dad's friend gets donation cars and sells them and part of the cash he keeps and the rest goes to charity. Anyhow, he's got a 1977 MGB which I looked at today. It's pretty much scrap at this point, but my dick got hard thinking about it restored. As you all know men have an affinity with fixing things, and I want that experience. The well maintained ones are worth like 5-10,000 and I saw a fully restored one online for over 26,000. He's selling it for a few hundred since he got it for free and it currently doesn't drive. It'd be a shit ton of man hours and thousands of dollars to fix it myself, but certainly it'd be worth more then I put into it, even if only for personal use.

Sound like a good idea or is it not worth the effort?

EAGLE EYE
04-27-2010, 06:33 PM
If you have thousands of dollars coming into your name sometime soon I'd say go ahead and do it. But instead of an MGB you should restore a 442 or a Chevelle.

If you plan on paying your way through college then non of this is an option. I assume you probably have some scholarships lined up? Restoring classics is usually dominated by the 40+ crowd. I used to work with a construction foremen who had some sick rides that he constantly flipped for profit after the restoration was done.

Never buy something in New England because the weather ruins anything with rust. Unless it has been garaged for the duration of its life. You are better off finding something online down south and getting it shipped up or retrieve it yourself.

HANZO
04-27-2010, 06:44 PM
iv sort of done it before, not really restoring old classics but buying damaged cars fixing them up and selling on for a profit.

i dnt kno much about American cars and whether or not they will make a profit, but restoring a car is a good way to waste your time and ofcourse you learn alot in the process.

you need the funds obviously, it can get expensive there will be many times where you order a part and something totally different is delivered then you gotta wait another month for the right part to come. if you got a garage and all the right tools it makes life so much easier. the most expensive thing about restoration from what iv experienced is the painting. shit can cost loads so be prepared for that.

if you got the money go for it, do the knowledge though. whatever car your gonna work on do a propa in-depth analysis, learn everything about it. from the types of paint used to the factory standard nuts and bolts used.

EAGLE EYE
04-27-2010, 06:47 PM
Never go to a chain-franchise like Maaco for paint. They do a horrendous job.

TheBoarzHeadBoy
04-27-2010, 07:29 PM
If you have thousands of dollars coming into your name sometime soon I'd say go ahead and do it. But instead of an MGB you should restore a 442 or a Chevelle.

If you plan on paying your way through college then non of this is an option. I assume you probably have some scholarships lined up? Restoring classics is usually dominated by the 40+ crowd. I used to work with a construction foremen who had some sick rides that he constantly flipped for profit after the restoration was done.

Never buy something in New England because the weather ruins anything with rust. Unless it has been garaged for the duration of its life. You are better off finding something online down south and getting it shipped up or retrieve it yourself.

Rusted doesn't even begin to describe it.

I don't think I'm interested in the exact car, but I've been looking at some old packards and stuff on ebay motors because this sparked an interest. One of them was a 1938 inline eight that still ran on the original engine, the only new parts were a carburetor and a new starter and fresh gas and oil and it ran after decades of not being used. They don't make them like that anymore. Which is a pity because I'd be the envy of any college campus rolling up in a gangster 1930s car like that.

I'm probably just gonna put away some money and keep an eye on the market for a while. No reason to jump into it.