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EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 01:18 AM
http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/TECH/04/29/cashmore.google.facebook/story.cashmore.jpg



STORY HIGHLIGHTS


Facebook's Web-wide "Like" button may spell trouble for Google
Facebook recently added button to let people recommend Web sites to friends
"Like" feature is more social version of Web link
But search engines may not have access to data about recommendations



RELATED TOPICS


Facebook Inc. (http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Facebook_Inc)
Google Inc. (http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Google_Inc)
Internet (http://topics.edition.cnn.com/topics/Internet)



Editor's note: Pete Cashmore is founder and CEO of Mashable (http://www.mashable.com/), a popular blog about social media. He writes a weekly column about social networking and technology for CNN.com (http://edition.cnn.com/).
London, England (CNN) -- Facebook dropped a bombshell on the tech industry last week in the form of a Web-wide "Like" button and the launch of the "Open Graph." (http://edition.cnn.com/2010/TECH/04/21/facebook.changes.f8/index.html)
Using this new platform, Web sites can drive Web traffic from Facebook by including Like buttons on their pages; every Like posts an update to that user's Facebook page.
What's more, any Web site can customize its experience for you, if you're logged into Facebook: Suddenly CNN.com stories can be ranked not just by an editor but by your friends too.
Likes replace links?
Facebook announced Likes as a form of "social links" -- better than a link because it's related to a specific user. If Like buttons take off, that's really bad news for Google, since its algorithm uses links between sites to determine their order in search results.
Facebook seeks to replace this open system of links between pages with the "social links" (or Likes) that it controls. Google and other search engines won't have full access to all these Likes, so the company best positioned to rank the Web will be Facebook. No wonder the "open Web" advocates are sounding the alarm (http://blog.dataportability.org/2010/04/25/assessing-the-openess-of-facebooks-open-graph-protocol/), concerned that a single company will stockpile all of our personal information and preferences.
Already there are calls to create an "OpenLike" standard that's accessible to all, reports Facebook watcher Nick O'Neill (http://www.allfacebook.com/2010/04/did-like-just-replace-the-link/).
Facebook optimization?
Can the measurement of an industry affect the output of that industry? If an Academy Award is the ultimate measure of a movie, do directors set out to create great films or Oscar-winning ones?
Appearing on the first page of Google results for your chosen search term is perhaps the online equivalent of an Oscar win.
As Google rose to become the barometer of all that's worthy on the Web, publishers rushed to change their sites to appease the Google god. "Search Engine Optimization" became a massive industry; a multitude of SEO consultants sprung up, offering to tweak your Web site to better fit Google's measure of the Web.
What if Facebook Likes take off? Or to use the proper jargon: What if the Open Graph becomes the measure of the Web? Will publishers change their sites to appease our new overlord?
I'm already seeing it: Thousands of sites are adding Facebook's version of semantic data in preference to the open standards as Facebook becomes the new kingmaker. In the week since launch, more than 50,000 Web sites have added Facebook's "social plug-ins." All of which will make it blissfully easy for Facebook to organize the Web:
Facebook Optimization may be the new SEO.
Open Web advocates have reason to be concerned. Privacy experts are also raising red flags. No doubt they'll find an ally in Google: Without access to the stitches that bind Web pages together, the search engine could falter.

EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 01:21 AM
http://img94.imageshack.us/img94/7177/screenshot20100430at131.png

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/7259/screenshot20100430at219.png

EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 01:22 AM
http://film.onet.pl/_i/film/b/bad_santa/g/g03.jpg

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/7259/screenshot20100430at219.png

EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 01:26 AM
http://www.muzeconnects.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/11/sandra-bullock-the-blind-side.jpg

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/7259/screenshot20100430at219.png

RzaRectum
04-30-2010, 01:49 AM
Personally, I think Google, Facebook, Myspace, and all those other conglomerate company's schlongs are too big for their magnums. This reliance on preferred websites is leaving the door open for too much information to be stored in one place.

Imagine a world where someone, somewhere, knows everything there is to know about you.. because you freely gave it to one of his companies. And he had to give it to someone else.. because the courts ordered him to do so. Imagine the F3DS only having to subpoena google or facebook to track you down. Zero privacy, because you clicked ok to the terms of service.

Imagine that the mobile use of your facebook account now has coordinances that are posted to your account, like those ridiculous 4-square check-in apps that tell everyone you went to White Castle. Make it easy to get tracked by showing the world, because you can't stand to think no one cares your Tex-Mex leftovers gave you the runs.

EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 02:10 AM
Mark Zuckerberg already said off record that "he doesn't care about people's privacy"


If I was in his position I probably wouldn't either. He's now opening the flood gates to marketers and 3rd parties with their latest direction and projects which are under the hood. (The average person out there won't have a clue)

However, No one is forcing you to use his platform or post status updates.

RzaRectum
04-30-2010, 02:20 AM
However, No one is forcing you to use his platform or post status updates.
You obviously don't remember what peer pressure is like. No one wants to be left out while their friends are having so much fun posting their pictures and commenting on the status of their friends.

Indeed, there is no coersion, but the sense of loss is great. In the end the price everyone pays will be their liberties and freedoms they fail to appreciate to this day.

EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 02:32 AM
You obviously don't remember what peer pressure is like. No one wants to be left out while their friends are having so much fun posting their pictures and commenting on the status of their friends.

Indeed, there is no coersion, but the sense of loss is great. In the end the price everyone pays will be their liberties and freedoms they fail to appreciate to this day.



Well.. humanity is addicted to innovation. (I posted a video about this in a different thread).


In the meantime play it safe and don't make an ass out of yourselves using social networking tools. Read privacy policies and use best judgement.


Or go off the grid like in the movie Body Of Lies

Lex Lugor
04-30-2010, 02:58 AM
Thank jesus fucking christ I never got all hung up on twating. I think I got an account when it first became the new gonorrhea but it never took hold.

EAGLE EYE
04-30-2010, 03:02 AM
To be honest most friends and family really just aren't that interesting IMO.

MSSGBRDING & hilarious internet memes is what I find fascinating.

Lex Lugor
04-30-2010, 03:06 AM
http://www.theodoresworld.net/pics/1208/davidspadeImage10.jpg

Uncle Steezo
04-30-2010, 05:38 AM
robby beats dix wearing a powerglove, to porn that looks like matrix code.
http://www.movieprop.com/tvandmovie/reviews/matrixmorpheus1.jpg

cutn' heads
04-30-2010, 07:38 AM
once i score a million on bejewled blitz im deleting my FB account...

Mumm Ra
04-30-2010, 07:45 AM
Thank jesus fucking christ I never got all hung up on twating.
hey man I love the twat

KATO
04-30-2010, 01:20 PM
oHl_MuqwMsI

Dr. Simon Hurt
04-30-2010, 03:29 PM
facebook is destroying society
it also ruined my childhood, killed my father and raped my mother...before my very eyes.

SKAMPOE
04-30-2010, 03:46 PM
http://film.onet.pl/_i/film/b/bad_santa/g/g03.jpg

http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/7259/screenshot20100430at219.png
http://img339.imageshack.us/img339/7259/screenshot20100430at219.png

SKAMPOE
04-30-2010, 03:47 PM
facebook is destroying society
it also ruined my childhood, killed my father and raped my mother...before my very eyes.
werd, its ruining my posting here, i stay on facebook... i have a personal one with little or no corp heads....the corp has fallen off HARD

Ol' Dirty Trixˣ
05-01-2010, 05:02 PM
just wanted to say in this thread that i've deleted all internet people from my fb.

don't take it personal.

EAGLE EYE
05-02-2010, 10:55 PM
Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline (http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline)

RzaRectum
05-02-2010, 11:14 PM
Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline (http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline)
Don't be lazy.

April 28th, 2010 Facebook's Eroding Privacy Policy: A Timeline (http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline)


Commentary (http://www.eff.org/blog-categories/commentary) by Kurt Opsahl (http://www.eff.org/about/staff/kurt-opsahl)
Since its incorporation just over five years ago, Facebook has undergone a remarkable transformation. When it started, it was a private space for communication with a group of your choice. Soon, it transformed into a platform where much of your information is public by default. Today, it has become a platform where you have no choice but to make certain information public, and this public information (https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/handy-facebook-english-translator#public_information) may be shared (http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=17100) by Facebook with its partner websites and used to target ads (http://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=15415).
To help illustrate Facebook's shift away from privacy, we have highlighted some excerpts from Facebook's privacy policies over the years. Watch closely as your privacy disappears, one small change at a time!
Facebook Privacy Policy circa 2005 (http://web.archive.org/web/20050809235134/www.facebook.com/policy.php):
No personal information that you submit to Thefacebook will be available to any user of the Web Site who does not belong to at least one of the groups specified by you in your privacy settings.
Facebook Privacy Policy circa 2006 (http://web.archive.org/web/20060406105119/http://www.facebook.com/policy.php):
We understand you may not want everyone in the world to have the information you share on Facebook; that is why we give you control of your information. Our default privacy settings limit the information displayed in your profile to your school, your specified local area, and other reasonable community limitations that we tell you about.
Facebook Privacy Policy circa 2007 (http://web.archive.org/web/20070118161422/http://www.facebook.com/policy.php):
Profile information you submit to Facebook will be available to users of Facebook who belong to at least one of the networks you allow to access the information through your privacy settings (e.g., school, geography, friends of friends). Your name, school name, and profile picture thumbnail will be available in search results across the Facebook network unless you alter your privacy settings.
Facebook Privacy Policy circa November 2009 (http://www.tosback.org/version.php?vid=961):
Facebook is designed to make it easy for you to share your information with anyone you want. You decide how much information you feel comfortable sharing on Facebook and you control how it is distributed through your privacy settings. You should review the default privacy settings and change them if necessary to reflect your preferences. You should also consider your settings whenever you share information. ...
Information set to “everyone” is publicly available information, may be accessed by everyone on the Internet (including people not logged into Facebook), is subject to indexing by third party search engines, may be associated with you outside of Facebook (such as when you visit other sites on the internet), and may be imported and exported by us and others without privacy limitations. The default privacy setting for certain types of information you post on Facebook is set to “everyone.” You can review and change the default settings in your privacy settings.
Facebook Privacy Policy circa December 2009 (http://www.tosback.org/version.php?vid=965):
Certain categories of information such as your name, profile photo, list of friends and pages you are a fan of (https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/handy-facebook-english-translator#pages), gender, geographic region, and networks you belong to are considered publicly available to everyone, including Facebook-enhanced applications, and therefore do not have privacy settings. You can, however, limit the ability of others to find this information through search using your search privacy settings.
Current Facebook Privacy Policy, as of April 2010 (http://www.facebook.com/policy.php):
When you connect with an application or website it will have access to General Information about you. The term General Information includes your and your friends’ names, profile pictures, gender, user IDs, connections (https://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/handy-facebook-english-translator#connections), and any content shared using the Everyone privacy setting. ... The default privacy setting for certain types of information you post on Facebook is set to “everyone.” ... Because it takes two to connect, your privacy settings only control who can see the connection on your profile page. If you are uncomfortable with the connection being publicly available, you should consider removing (or not making) the connection.
Viewed together, the successive policies tell a clear story. Facebook originally earned its core base of users by offering them simple and powerful controls over their personal information. As Facebook grew larger and became more important, it could have chosen to maintain or improve those controls. Instead, it's slowly but surely helped itself — and its advertising and business partners — to more and more of its users' information, while limiting the users' options to control their own information.
Related Issues: Privacy (http://www.eff.org/issues/privacy), Social Networks (http://www.eff.org/issues/social-networks), Terms Of (Ab)Use (http://www.eff.org/issues/terms-of-abuse)
[Permalink (http://www.eff.org/deeplinks/2010/04/facebook-timeline)]



In case some of you haven't noticed.. there is a new thing that forces you to make a connection to your city that almost drastically changes how your page is viewed by default.

Longbongcilvaringz
05-03-2010, 02:58 PM
I don't get how everyone is so casual about using their real names on facebook, and posting innumerable images of themselves, while in the same breathe complaining about privacy.

Everywhere else people operate anonymously on the net (at least superficially) yet a site suddenly tells everyone to record all their personal information, and they do.

You get people complaining about prospective employers searching for their facebooks, when they have freely surrendered this information themselves.

Facebook owns everything you put on there.

All the privacy settings on facebook are tokenistic, they prevent certain people from seeing this information if they can't be bothered circumnavigating these boundaries.

Facebook still own whatever you put on there, and can do with it what they please.

You can never delete this, you can only "deactivate" your account.

In an environment of such prevalent internet paranoia, it's ironic that nearly everyone just surrenders their privacy to a huge organisation without thinking twice.

I guess using a pseudonym on facebook would be 'anti social' though :)

EAGLE EYE
05-03-2010, 03:03 PM
Everywhere else people operate anonymously on the net (at least superficially) yet a site suddenly tells everyone to record all their personal information, and they do.


This is what I found remarkable. The early adopters of it (like my two cousins back in '05) had no idea how huge it would grow.


I'm still dumbfounded why people feel like they have document their every waking minute.

Jutzu-Lo-Killer
05-03-2010, 03:04 PM
facebook is destroying society
it also ruined my childhood, killed my father and raped my mother...before my very eyes.

hahahahhahhahahahahahahha

Longbongcilvaringz
05-03-2010, 03:11 PM
This is what I found remarkable. The early adopters of it (like my two cousins back in '05) had no idea how huge it would grow.


I'm still dumbfounded why people feel like they have document their every waking minute.

When i signed up to facebook way back whenever i used a pseudonym just out of habit.

It turned out to be pure luck, i didn't even realise you were "meant" to use your real name.

I'm glad i didn't in the end, especially if in a few years time i get a spam email from an erectile dysfunction company bearing a glowing testimonial and the full name and face of one of my facebook friend haha.

EAGLE EYE
05-03-2010, 03:27 PM
What's even more amusing is the underlying psychology related to the user base.

Facebook was predominately made up of white people in the early years, who saw the platform as a safe haven with strict privacy options and a sterile clean atmosphere. Unlike the shitty, customizable myspace network full of (XYZ)

But now (XYZ) is migrating to FB and they are showing up in the 'people you may know' section hahahahahahhaahha.

Longbongcilvaringz
05-03-2010, 03:31 PM
haha, yeah, that's a good point.

Myspace pages were always a fucking mess, as a fastidious white male, i never wanted to use it.

Facebook is becoming a clusterfuck of 'likes' and shitty applications like Farmville or whatever.

My feed is always full of faggits letting me know that they now have like 7 magical chicken eggs in their farm. I have half my friends blocked from the news feed as a result.

EAGLE EYE
05-03-2010, 04:01 PM
haha, yeah, that's a good point.

Myspace pages were always a fucking mess, as a fastidious white male, i never wanted to use it.

Facebook is becoming a clusterfuck of 'likes' and shitty applications like Farmville or whatever.

My feed is always full of faggits letting me know that they now have like 7 magical chicken eggs in their farm. I have half my friends blocked from the news feed as a result.


Haha I've blocked 31 people up to this point. Half of them use ridiculous child-like apps and the rest are people who are train-wrecks of depression and narcissism

RzaRectum
05-03-2010, 11:00 PM
My feed is always full of faggits letting me know that they now have like 7 magical chicken eggs in their farm. I have half my friends blocked from the news feed as a result.
:lmao: +1

Mumm Ra
05-03-2010, 11:04 PM
yeah there's this zooruka-type christian fellow on my FB (went to HS with em) who constantly plays mafia wars, and will set his status asking people to play mafia wars and help him do whatever the fuck he does on there
its bad enough to get auto-updates from the app, but don't post shit on your own about the game too

Uncle Steezo
05-04-2010, 03:31 AM
i have all apps blocked.
sean isn't your real name is posted here?
and photo? eating chips?

Longbongcilvaringz
05-04-2010, 04:33 AM
I never posted my real name here or gave it to anyone here though.

And this site doesn't own those details. If it decided to use them for marketing purposes i could easily take legal action to prevent it.

Try doing the same shit when Facebook starts using your personal information, and see what they have to say.