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Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 12:35 PM
Thought I would post in Gen Chat since im sure the book thread is dead.

Anyways, hes a good horror story writer some good stories I've read of him. Only problem is, like other writers of the earlier 20th century, I found he is overdescriptive. It doesnt make for overly pleasant reading, although I recognise the merit of it, if only in small quantities.

But when it gets to the more vivid and meaningful segment its actually quite scary.

I will post a link to a massive webpage of at least 15 of his short stories, provided the mods are cool with it.

The Arkham Asylum of the DC Universe was to my knowledge inspired by the fictional setting of Arkham MA of Lovecraft' creation.


http://img1.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/c0/c535.jpg

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 01:14 PM
I'm a big Lovecraft fan. He writes in an overdone Gothic style. Probably the biggest nigger hater to every come out of America, but still a decent author.

Arkham is Lovecrafts fictionalized version of the Salem area in Massachusetts. He just renamed it for his writing liberties but its all there. Miskatonic University is Salem State. The Sanitarium is Danvers State Hospital which is all part of the same area. The Miskatonic is the Naumkeag River.

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 01:18 PM
He was skilled at creating an atmosphere of decay and encroaching madness; slowly and insidiously unsettling the reader, it was a more cerebral and subtle horror than any I had ever read before.

I was a fan when I was like 13-14, until I realized what an inveterate and reprehensible racist he was, specifically against Blacks and Jews. There are a bunch of stories with suspect comments and characters, but it's most blatant in "The Rats In The Walls", "Herbert West: Re-Animator", and most of the stories he wrote when he lived in New York.

"At The Mountains of Madness" and some of his other later stories are classic, though. But like you said, his prose style is rife with superfluous descriptions, stilted and awkward dialogue, and slow pacing.

KATO
08-12-2010, 01:22 PM
http://www.asaltandbattery.com/assets/images/products/copies/lg_hp-sauce-big.jpg

http://www.faithfullyfrugal-and-free.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/world_of_warcraft_logo-1931.jpg


H.P. warcraft is garbage, and so are you if you like him....

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 01:23 PM
I'm a big Lovecraft fan. He writes in an overdone Gothic style. Probably the biggest nigger hater to every come out of America, but still a decent author.

Arkham is Lovecrafts fictionalized version of the Salem area in Massachusetts. He just renamed it for his writing liberties but its all there. Miskatonic University is Salem State. The Sanitarium is Danvers State Hospital which is all part of the same area. The Miskatonic is the Naumkeag River.

There's a site online with excerpts from his collected letters and the stuff he writes about jews and blacks is mind-boggling. I think it's sad that a highly imaginative and forward-thinking person in some ways, could be so excessively ignorant in others. His views were extreme even for their time.

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 01:24 PM
I know, I've read his stuff. He hates blacks to the point of insanity. Its kind of funny actually how nuts he was about anyone non Anglo. Oh well, most geniuses are crazy. Tesla and pigeons. Perfect example.


Its on purpose though. Its part of the Gothic Style. Frankenstein is just as hard to read until you're into it. Although Ms. Shelley was actually writing an allegory and H.P. was grinding out imitation for pulp fiction. I like Gothic writing. Its a touch better then Epic literature in readability.

Still no Stephen King. King might be corny at times, but his voice when he writes stuff is the best there is.

KATO
08-12-2010, 01:25 PM
http://media.urbandictionary.com/image/page/wfc-25990.jpg

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 01:27 PM
Ok Jordan what do you read between girly magazines?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PvkMEoqmbBA

KATO
08-12-2010, 01:38 PM
http://dailycontempt.com/wp-content/uploads/oj_simpson_if_i_did_it.jpg

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 01:39 PM
http://media.urbandictionary.com/image/page/wfc-25990.jpg

Glad to see such a positive response to teh HP
Of course being the corp there were bound to be some infiltrations of spastics and ceited allies.

Anyway yeah I read he was pretty racist. I dint read enough of his stuff yet to see his rampant racism, but seeing nigger i wasnt surprised to some degree owing to that era.

I was reading one of the stories where the characters cat was called Nigger-Man lol

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 01:41 PM
ahha The Rats In The Walls thats the one.

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 01:45 PM
http://dailycontempt.com/wp-content/uploads/oj_simpson_if_i_did_it.jpg

Classic.

KATO
08-12-2010, 01:46 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MDT7no8OiLU

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 01:46 PM
I'm a big Lovecraft fan. He writes in an overdone Gothic style. Probably the biggest nigger hater to every come out of America, but still a decent author.

Arkham is Lovecrafts fictionalized version of the Salem area in Massachusetts. He just renamed it for his writing liberties but its all there. Miskatonic University is Salem State. The Sanitarium is Danvers State Hospital which is all part of the same area. The Miskatonic is the Naumkeag River.

lols i didnt catch onto the whole salem/arkham thing even though ive been told alot about salem, been to new england( i got relatives there) and have read about the lovecraft stuff

KATO
08-12-2010, 01:51 PM
SOI4OF7iIr4

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 01:52 PM
cool thanks

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 01:57 PM
I know, I've read his stuff. He hates blacks to the point of insanity. Its kind of funny actually how nuts he was about anyone non Anglo. Oh well, most geniuses are crazy. Tesla and pigeons. Perfect example.


Its on purpose though. Its part of the Gothic Style. Frankenstein is just as hard to read until you're into it. Although Ms. Shelley was actually writing an allegory and H.P. was grinding out imitation for pulp fiction. I like Gothic writing. Its a touch better then Epic literature in readability.

Still no Stephen King. King might be corny at times, but his voice when he writes stuff is the best there is.

I would say Lovecraft's authorial voice is somewhere between Shelly, Poe, and Howard...I didn't find it difficult to read at all; on the contrary, I found some of the linguistic excesses made the stories easier to follow. It's so overwritten that it forces you to understand what is happening.

The story about the guy underground who is scared of a monster that turns out to be his own reflection was a good one.

http://media.urbandictionary.com/image/page/wfc-25990.jpg

well, you cared enough to find this picture and post it in the thread, so...

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 02:04 PM
I would say Lovecraft's authorial voice is somewhere between Shelly, Poe, and Howard...I didn't find it difficult to read at all; on the contrary, I found some of the linguistic excesses made the stories easier to follow. It's so overwritten that it forces you to understand what is happening.

The story about the guy underground who is scared of a monster that turns out to be his own reflection was a good one.



well, you cared enough to find this picture and post it in the thread, so...

i see where your coming from, but that effect should be used to a limited effect imo. theres a fine line between descriptive effect and OTT. i found the same with tolkien. i read another story about this man who went into the arabian desert into this desrted city and found a cult of lizards or something. that wasnt overly descriptive but it was descriptive enough to add character style and most importantly fear to the story.

peace

and oh ive read about edgar allen poe, read he was one of the best horror writers. im assuming he didnt have a whole mythological crazy universe like HP?

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 02:07 PM
http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0600031h.html#01

Uncle Steezo
08-12-2010, 02:18 PM
necronomicon is all ive read from lovecraft.

KATO
08-12-2010, 02:19 PM
well, you cared enough to find this picture and post it in the thread, so...

shut up and dance!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6ZY2sSDQCk

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 02:24 PM
necronomicon is all ive read from lovecraft.

read the first one from that link "The Nameless City" thats dope scary

Poison Flowerz!
08-12-2010, 02:27 PM
Lovecraft lived in RED HOOK of all places (Shabazz trhe Disciple)
I have the necronomicon and lots of other HP books, aswell as other Mythos writers. I advise anyone who likes HP Lovecraft to check out Clark Ashton Smith, Craft himself said Clark was a better writer then him. I possess a folder with hundreds of Lovecraft Poems, Stories, Essays, Letters, Synopsis', etc. maybe ill upload it sometime

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 02:31 PM
nice.

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 02:32 PM
lols i didnt catch onto the whole salem/arkham thing even though ive been told alot about salem, been to new england( i got relatives there) and have read about the lovecraft stuff

I think New England is probably the most British part of the country. Everyone's Irish, drinks cheap beer, gets in fights over nothing, and have a very different perspective then the rest of America. Pretty much anything from New York north and eastwards is still England. Everyone south or west of New York are full of shit. I mean if you're on beacon hill you'd think you were in Europe. Bostons that rare "nice city to live in." Not many of those in America.

Uncle Steezo
08-12-2010, 02:32 PM
maybe you should upload it to box.net NOW!
LOL

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 02:34 PM
I think New England is probably the most British part of the country. Everyone's Irish, drinks cheap beer, gets in fights over nothing, and have a very different perspective then the rest of America. Pretty much anything from New York north and eastwards is still England. Everyone south or west of New York are full of shit. I mean if you're on beacon hill you'd think you were in Europe. Bostons that rare "nice city to live in." Not many of those in America.

yeah i know i felt like i was in england lol
yeah boston was cool, ive been to NH/vermont and maine too.
i went to that science museum in boston saw a dope film on the Nile river in IMAX, then proceeded to walk around in my white sox hat

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 02:38 PM
i see where your coming from, but that effect should be used to a limited effect imo. theres a fine line between descriptive effect and OTT. i found the same with tolkien. i read another story about this man who went into the arabian desert into this desrted city and found a cult of lizards or something. that wasnt overly descriptive but it was descriptive enough to add character style and most importantly fear to the story.

peace

and oh ive read about edgar allen poe, read he was one of the best horror writers. im assuming he didnt have a whole mythological crazy universe like HP?

Poes better known for his poetry. He also invented the detective mystery stories (Sherlock Holmes was inspired by among many people one of his characters). He was a more realistic writer. More traditional ghost story stuff in his poetry. He was a very depressed man. Bad for him but good for literature.

Undiluted Karma
08-12-2010, 02:40 PM
lol

ill stick with Lovecraft in terms of horror for now, I havent even scratched the surface of the mythos and all the HP Lovecraft Killa Beez work too
all this yuggoth and dagon shit is spacing me out mang

Poison Flowerz!
08-12-2010, 02:47 PM
I tried to get into Poe but he was far too traditional for me. Ofcourse that wasn't his fault, all the copy cats took care of that. I prefer the surrealism of the mythos writers

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 02:53 PM
That's the problem reading classics. They were break through when they were written and over a century later its like "I kind of expected more from it."

CEITEDMOFO
08-12-2010, 07:38 PM
BOOKWOrM ASS NIGGAZ

Uncle Steezo
08-12-2010, 07:51 PM
That's the problem reading classics. They were break through when they were written and over a century later its like "I kind of expected more from it."
maybe its you.
i take that back.

it IS you.

a classic is a classic.

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 09:13 PM
No they're still great, but when I read Frankenstein for example its an intelligent book with a lot of questions about the role of life and religious allegories hidden in a monster story, but I thought it would be different. Some authors grind against my head when I read. She's not one of them, but a lot of great books are. Arthur Conan Doyle luckily has a perfect narrative voice and I can breeze through his stuff. Tolkien, Herbert, or Tom Clancy I can't read. I have read books by them but its not the same experience. The Silmarillion is interesting but I can't just sit down and read it. Dune is the same way. I have to read them like chapter by chapter which I never do. Tom Clancy is just a clusterfuck.

I guess I like easy reads. Sue me.

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 09:21 PM
Lovecraft lived in RED HOOK of all places (Shabazz trhe Disciple)
I have the necronomicon and lots of other HP books, aswell as other Mythos writers. I advise anyone who likes HP Lovecraft to check out Clark Ashton Smith, Craft himself said Clark was a better writer then him. I possess a folder with hundreds of Lovecraft Poems, Stories, Essays, Letters, Synopsis', etc. maybe ill upload it sometime

Clark Ashton Smith is a superior author and literary stylist to Lovecraft in everyway, imo...a good primer for Smith would be "Out of Space and Time" a collection of short stories and 'prose poems'.


I really don't see how Herbert's authorial voice is that diifcult to read. The Dune series is excellent...there is so many layers of symbolism and interepretation that can be derived from it, specifically 'dune' and 'god emperor of dune'...i think that's the best science fiction series I've ever read.

I actually found Doyle's work to be similar to Asimov, in that it is almost too clear, there is no stylistic flair to their prose and almost no description or imagery.

Is anyone surprised that CEITEDMOFO doesn't read? Or that he can't?

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-12-2010, 09:29 PM
I like Doyle. He tells the story, puts enough in it you get a taste for things and thats it. Nothing flowery. Just eccentric Victorian characters doing eccentric Victorian shit. I feel like some authors go out of their way to paint the picture instead of telling the story. But then I guess different genres have different needs.

Dune is great, but its a slow read for me. Maybe its all the foreign or made up terms and stuff that I constantly have to reference in the back. Maybe I'm not relating to his characters because they're more epic. I'm not sure. Some books I read in a few afternoons, some of the same length take a month. The Dune stuff is a monther.

Seeing as I can't figure out what he means by CEITEDMOFO I'm not surprised. Like conceited motherfucker?

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 09:49 PM
Dune is great, but its a slow read for me. Maybe its all the foreign or made up terms and stuff that I constantly have to reference in the back. Maybe I'm not relating to his characters because they're more epic. I'm not sure. Some books I read in a few afternoons, some of the same length take a month. The Dune stuff is a monther.


I hear you...I think it's just a matter of taste and preference; sometimes I want to be fully immersed in world-building and complex pseudo-history...the first time I read Dune, I read it twice in a week lol (because the library didn't have 'messiah')

The Sherlock books I tended to tear through in like 1 or 2 days, Asimov and Arthur C Clarke were the same way...some of their books I would literally read in one or two sittings...and those were when I was in the mood for something more 'breezy' or 'lighter'.

CEITEDMOFO reminds me of that guy who his fellow degenerate halfwits at school thought was cool when he was like 15, so he stopped progressing at that point; and now everyone has surpassed him on every level imaginable.

But back on topic...I actually got a Barnes and Noble hardcover 'complete fiction of hp lovecraft' omnibus for christmas 2 years ago...and had totally forgotten about it. There's tons of shit here I have never read, so I might have to dip into it and revisit the bigot.

http://search.barnesandnoble.com/HP-Lovecraft/H-P-Lovecraft/e/9781435107939/?itm=7&USRI=barnes+and+noble+lovecraft

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 09:55 PM
Poes better known for his poetry. He also invented the detective mystery stories (Sherlock Holmes was inspired by among many people one of his characters). He was a more realistic writer. More traditional ghost story stuff in his poetry. He was a very depressed man. Bad for him but good for literature.

Detective Dupin from 'murders in rue morgue' IIRC.

His poems are amazing.

Cthulhu
08-12-2010, 10:13 PM
I used to be a huge fan back in high school, hence my screen name. Hardly ever pick his stuff up now, but I still do love stories like "The Dreams in the Witch-House" and "The Call of Cthulhu." The former especially is awesome and nightmarish.

These days I'm much more interested in the original gothic fiction and dark romanticism that influenced Lovecraft as well as decadent/symbolist poetery & fiction, and surrealist writings.

My suggestions for this vein of writing:
The Monk by Matthew Lewis
-classic gothic novel, one of the most fast-paced consistently interesting ones too. It was one of the more transgressive ones too for featuring more violence and cruelty as well as real ghosts and demons instead of the Anne Radcliffe formula which only suggested such things but gave "rational" and "safe" explanations for them

E.T.A. Hoffmann - any stories, but check out "The Sandman" and "The Golden Pot" most
-German romantic author and composer. Probably best known for writing the short story that The Nutcracker ballet was based on, but his weird horror/fantasy short stories are much better. "The Sandman" was the basis for Freud's essay on the Uncanny and features among other things a Sandman who steals children's eyeballs and an automaton (mechanical human/precursor to robot).

Les Chants de Maldoror/The Songs of Maldoror - Comte de Lautreamont
-Often considered the first surrealist novel by the surrealists of the 1920s, but this was written in the 1870s. The author died at age 24 and this was one of only two works he wrote. It's an extremely nightmarish, evil book composed of vignettes/prose poems narrated by a being called Maldoror who despises god and humanity. The vignettes are full of strange figurative language, gruesome and bizarre imagery, blasphemy, and a very mocking tone. Famous for the quote "...as beautiful as the chance meeting on a dissecting table of a sewing machine and an umbrella." I'd recommend the translation by Alexis Lykiard titled Maldoror.

Les Fleurs du Mal/The Flowers of Evil & Le Spleen de Paris/Paris Spleen by Charles Baudelaire
-not stories, but poetry. Flowers of Evil is verse, Paris Spleen is prose poems. This guy was the king of decadent French poetry. This stuff reeks of absinthe, opium dens, Parisian whorehouses, and dark alleyways. Lots of macabre and gruesome imagery, black humour, and some very sharp invectives against former lovers. I recommend the Oxford translation for Flowers of Evil.

This is his poem "A Carcass" (trans. by James McGowen)

Remember, my love, the object we saw
That beautiful morning in June:
By a bend in the path a carcass reclined
On a bed sown with pebbles and stones;

Her legs were spread out like a lecherous whore,
Sweating out poisonous fumes,
Who opened in slick invitational style
Her stinking and festering womb.

The sun on this rottenness focused its rays
To cook the cadaver till done,
And render to Nature a hundredfold gift
Of all she'd united in one.

And the sky cast an eye on this marvellous meat
As over the flowers in bloom.
The stench was so wretched that there on the grass
You nearly collapsed in a swoon.

The flies buzzed and droned on these bowels of filth
Where an army of maggots arose,
Which flowed with a liquid and thickening stream
On the animate rags of her clothes.

And it rose and it fell, and pulsed like a wave,
Rushing and bubbling with health.
One could say that this carcass, blown with vague breath,
Lived in increasing itself.

And this whole teeming world made a musical sound
Like babbling brooks and the breeze,
Or the grain that a man with a winnowing-fan
Turns with a rhythmical ease.

The shapes wore away as if only a dream
Like a sketch that is left on the page
Which the artist forgot and can only complete
On the canvas, with memory's aid.

From back in the rocks, a pitiful bitch
Eyed us with angry distaste,
Awaiting the moment to snatch from the bones
The morsel she'd dropped in her haste.

- And you, in your turn, will be rotten as this:
Horrible, filthy, undone,
O sun of my nature and star of my eyes,
My passion, my angel in one!

Yes, such will you be, o regent of grace,
After the rites have been read,
Under the weeds, under blossoming grass
As you moulder with bones of the dead.

Ah then, o my beauty, explain to the worms
Who cherish your body so tine,
That I am the keeper for corpses of love
Of the form, and the essence divine!

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-12-2010, 10:54 PM
^the Baudelaire poems are incredible, also the writings of Lord Dunsany are eseential gothic fiction, and they were a huge influence on Lovecraft and Clark Ashton Smith.
I read "The Monk" when I was a freshman, and it holds up surprisingly well today...I'll have to check out that other stuff eventually.

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-13-2010, 01:27 AM
I wonder why people are so drawn to things we view as bad. I remember Tolkien making a note of it in the Hobbit saying something amounting to "people grow bored reading pleasant things before they grow bored of unpleasant things" which is why the stay at Rivendell is skipped over as uneventfully nice while he will spend time mentioning the bad things elsewhere.

Humans are drawn to death. There's a nihilistic undertone in the human mind. Sex, Drugs, rock and roll. That poem is beautiful in a perverted way. I think that's why I'm so against the idea of anti depressants for people. Melancholy is beautiful. For every man who wants to build something someone wants to tear it down. Probably why we can't get along.

Its like love. The suffering makes the bliss that much more powerful. Nero fiddles while Rome burns. True or not. Its a romantic (lol at the pun of a romantic roman) notion of composing a song set to the destruction of civilization. I should write a poem about it. Its like Lauryn Hill in Mystery of Iniquity (she must have a muse or be one, her stuff is clearly divinely inspired its so ingenious). It all falls down. It has to. Man is inherently corrupt. The works of man have to come down. Creation, Corruption, Cleansing, Creation. Brahma, Vishnu, Shiva, and back to Brahma.

Cthulhu
08-13-2010, 01:38 AM
Poes better known for his poetry. He also invented the detective mystery stories (Sherlock Holmes was inspired by among many people one of his characters). He was a more realistic writer. More traditional ghost story stuff in his poetry. He was a very depressed man. Bad for him but good for literature.

Hmm.... I don't know if he's better known for his poetry, but perhaps equally known. You could make the case that he made his most innovations in the realm of poetry, but I was always introduced to him, in childhood and in school, as a horror story writer (of course he was much more) and a poet.

I wouldn't call him that much of a realistic writer unless you're only reading his detective fiction. His stuff is pretty varied. Most of his macabre tales are wonderfully hallucinogenic like "Ligeia," "M.S. Found in a Bottle," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Masque of the Red Death," and "The Pit and the Pendulum". He has some off-the-wall comedy stories like "The Angel of the Odd" and "How to Write a Blackwood Article," strange epic sci-fi & adventure stories like "The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaal" and "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket," essays that turn into stories like "The Imp of the Perverse" (one of my favorites, and a big influence on Baudelaire), and some totally strange I-don't-know-if-these-are-prose-poems-or-stories-and-if-they-are-supposed-to-be-jokes-or-horror pieces like "Shadow - A Parable," "Silence - A Fable," and "The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion." Most of the stories I just mentioned are hardly realistic at all, although they may contain a lot of detail and rationalization from the characters. Only his detective stories are more "realistic."

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-13-2010, 01:47 AM
I've always seen his stuff as being written from an insane perspective. Like the characters are crazy but its set in a real world. Its drug addled dream stuff. But I feel its intended to be read that way. Lovecraft writes the same level of crazy but he's making it out to be the truth in the story. Poe has an insane narrator in most of his works. HPs are supposed to be the truth from the mouth of a madman.

I know he's considered a great horror writer but I've read more of his poems then his literature. I actually have a semi fictional story about his life that I haven't read but meant to. The Pale Blue Eye by Louis Bayard. Its supposed to be a decent read. Hopefully I'll get to it, I have a lot of stuff to read and summer is running out (I never end up reading much during the school year with all the school work and books they have me do)

Poison Flowerz!
08-13-2010, 01:51 AM
bookworm ass niggaz

опозорьте к славянскому

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-13-2010, 02:05 AM
Hmm.... I don't know if he's better known for his poetry, but perhaps equally known. You could make the case that he made his most innovations in the realm of poetry, but I was always introduced to him, in childhood and in school, as a horror story writer (of course he was much more) and a poet.

I wouldn't call him that much of a realistic writer unless you're only reading his detective fiction. His stuff is pretty varied. Most of his macabre tales are wonderfully hallucinogenic like "Ligeia," "M.S. Found in a Bottle," "The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Masque of the Red Death," and "The Pit and the Pendulum". He has some off-the-wall comedy stories like "The Angel of the Odd" and "How to Write a Blackwood Article," strange epic sci-fi & adventure stories like "The Unparalleled Adventure of One Hans Pfaal" and "The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym of Nantucket," essays that turn into stories like "The Imp of the Perverse" (one of my favorites, and a big influence on Baudelaire), and some totally strange I-don't-know-if-these-are-prose-poems-or-stories-and-if-they-are-supposed-to-be-jokes-or-horror pieces like "Shadow - A Parable," "Silence - A Fable," and "The Conversation of Eiros and Charmion." Most of the stories I just mentioned are hardly realistic at all, although they may contain a lot of detail and rationalization from the characters. Only his detective stories are more "realistic."

Pretty excellent summation of his work...the highlighted ones are personal favorites...i thought 'Hans Pfaal' and 'Arthur Gordon Pym' sucked, but I haven't read any Poe in years.

http://i629.photobucket.com/albums/uu20/apophenia729/Snapshot_20100813.jpg
literati-nerd chea

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-13-2010, 02:10 AM
In like ten years when I have my own house and shit I'm gonna get me all leather bound books for my drawing room. If not only for the reading but for the style. Hardbound shit is just cheap imitation of the real deal.

Dr. Simon Hurt
08-13-2010, 02:13 AM
^lol
well ok then, slugger.

Cthulhu
08-13-2010, 02:15 AM
Pretty excellent summation of his work...the highlighted ones are personal favorites...i thought 'Hans Pfaal' and 'Arthur Gordon Pym' sucked, but I haven't read any Poe in years.

http://i629.photobucket.com/albums/uu20/apophenia729/Snapshot_20100813.jpg
literati-nerd chea

Yeah I haven't read those two either, but I've seen an old "classics illustrated" version of "Hans Pfaal" and it didn't really make me want to read the whole thing. I tend to skip his longer works. I like his short and sweet stuff.

Cthulhu
08-13-2010, 02:20 AM
I've always seen his stuff as being written from an insane perspective. Like the characters are crazy but its set in a real world. Its drug addled dream stuff. But I feel its intended to be read that way. Lovecraft writes the same level of crazy but he's making it out to be the truth in the story. Poe has an insane narrator in most of his works. HPs are supposed to be the truth from the mouth of a madman.

I know he's considered a great horror writer but I've read more of his poems then his literature. I actually have a semi fictional story about his life that I haven't read but meant to. The Pale Blue Eye by Louis Bayard. Its supposed to be a decent read. Hopefully I'll get to it, I have a lot of stuff to read and summer is running out (I never end up reading much during the school year with all the school work and books they have me do)

He certainly likes to blur the line between reality and unreality, hence his characters are often prey to drugs ("Ligeia"), madness ("The Fall of the House of Usher," "The Tell-Tale Heart"), or some horrible circumstances ("M.S. Found in a Bottle," "The Pit and the Pendulum") that make their judgments hazy, but I don't know if he intends a clear-cut explanation that the characters were just mad. If anything, he's quite interested in how internal states are just as real to the experiencer as external factors, so there's really no difference if Ligeia was actually resurrected or if the narrator is just tripping on opium. Keep in mind, sometimes he doesn't have first-person narrators who are prey to delusion. Two of my favorites by him, "Hop-Frog" and "The Masque of the Red Death" (both set in medieval times) are third-person narrated but still very dreamlike.

Undiluted Karma
08-13-2010, 06:13 AM
I'm glad to see such a wide response to the works of Lovecraft and other books of substance too.

Ceited you might learn something if you read a book in a while, and no, Playgirl doesnt count

Undiluted Karma
08-13-2010, 06:18 AM
I've always seen his stuff as being written from an insane perspective. Like the characters are crazy but its set in a real world. Its drug addled dream stuff. But I feel its intended to be read that way. Lovecraft writes the same level of crazy but he's making it out to be the truth in the story. Poe has an insane narrator in most of his works. HPs are supposed to be the truth from the mouth of a madman.

I know he's considered a great horror writer but I've read more of his poems then his literature. I actually have a semi fictional story about his life that I haven't read but meant to. The Pale Blue Eye by Louis Bayard. Its supposed to be a decent read. Hopefully I'll get to it, I have a lot of stuff to read and summer is running out (I never end up reading much during the school year with all the school work and books they have me do)

I know what you mean Ive had a shit load of work past 2 years but A-Levels arent known for being easy hence being globally respected. and time is running out too, I start university in late september/october

Cthulhu
08-14-2010, 07:32 PM
necronomicon is all ive read from lovecraft.

Lovecraft doesn't have any story called "Necronomicon." It's a fictional grimoire often named or featured as an important object in many stories and, like numerous other fake books he and his circle of writers invented, it's supposed to make the reader go mad so he only "quotes" small passages. The "Necronomicons" you see in paperback in the occult section of your local major franchise bookstore are fakes that mesh together elements of Mesopotamian mythology and Lovecraft's work, but are certainly not real books of magic (as if there is such a thing).

CEITEDMOFO
08-14-2010, 08:06 PM
YOUR SAYING THERES NO TRUE BOOKS OF BLACK MAGIC AND ALCHEMY?

YOU SIR ARE A FAGGiT

Professor Poopsnagle
08-14-2010, 08:19 PM
These are the books I have:

a book about knives with pictures of ill combat knives
one with pictures of pin up girls
my favourite, a book by Richard Scarry that helped me learn English
Mosquito Coast by Paul Theroux
For the rest it's all Dutch books

I mostly read magazines and articles on the internet along with the occasional Charles Jones rant.

Tecknowledgist
08-14-2010, 09:15 PM
Lovecraft is one of my biggest influences as a writer.

"It is an unfortunate fact that the bulk of humanity is too limited in its mental vision to weigh with patience and intelligence those isolated phenomena, seen and felt only by a psychologically sensitive few, which lie outside its common experience. Men of broader intellect know that there is no sharp distinction betwixt the real and the unreal; that all things appear as they do only by virtue of the delicate individual physical and mental media through which we are made conscious of them; but the prosaic materialism of the majority condemns as madness the flashes of supersight which penetrate the common veil of obvious empricism."

"Death is merciful, for there is no return therefrom, but with him who has come back out of the nethermost chambers of night, haggard and knowing, peace rests nevermore."

TheBoarzHeadBoy
08-15-2010, 12:54 AM
I know what you mean Ive had a shit load of work past 2 years but A-Levels arent known for being easy hence being globally respected. and time is running out too, I start university in late september/october

Thank God I still have senior year. College is going to be a bitch. Not hard per se, but getting myself to do it instead of drinking and soaking slampieces in my man gravy. I'm a very disorganized person with little to no drive who only gets by on skill. I feel like freshman year in college is going to be a bitch.

Lovecraft doesn't have any story called "Necronomicon." It's a fictional grimoire often named or featured as an important object in many stories and, like numerous other fake books he and his circle of writers invented, it's supposed to make the reader go mad so he only "quotes" small passages. The "Necronomicons" you see in paperback in the occult section of your local major franchise bookstore are fakes that mesh together elements of Mesopotamian mythology and Lovecraft's work, but are certainly not real books of magic (as if there is such a thing).

I'm pretty sure there's a more modern collection of his stories called "The Necronomicon" though. Might be wrong.

YOUR SAYING THERES NO TRUE BOOKS OF BLACK MAGIC AND ALCHEMY?

YOU SIR ARE A FAGGiT

You know the first time you heard about the Necronomicon was in Evil Dead. The Necronomicon is in Akashic Records.

CEITEDMOFO
08-15-2010, 02:16 AM
I WASNT TALKIN ABOUT THE NECRONOMICON
i

Undiluted Karma
08-15-2010, 03:22 AM
Thank God I still have senior year. College is going to be a bitch. Not hard per se, but getting myself to do it instead of drinking and soaking slampieces in my man gravy. I'm a very disorganized person with little to no drive who only gets by on skill. I feel like freshman year in college is going to be a bitch.



I'm pretty sure there's a more modern collection of his stories called "The Necronomicon" though. Might be wrong.



You know the first time you heard about the Necronomicon was in Evil Dead. The Necronomicon is in Akashic Records.

yeah im worried about my work ethic ahha

Poison Flowerz!
09-14-2010, 03:56 AM
the necronomicon was manufactured by HPL, is no "real" necronomicon.

Nercomancy = Divine Corpse

necromancers were real ofcourse

i recently startted study the 3 books of west occultism. If you are into mythos read these books if you can find themm, you will understand the basis of mythos much more clearly.