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Old 03-26-2007, 08:37 PM   #26
Crackhead Bob
Lesbian Flamingo
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: Under a rock
Age: 45
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Default Chapeter 2 Mayday! Mayday! Kicker Troubles!

chap2 cont...

So after that $800 pot my stack was now up to about $1400 dollars and his was down below $1900. I believe he must have experienced a little shell shock from the hand as he seemingly tried to avoid playing hands against me for the next couple of hours, but eventually we locked horns again. I was in the big blind, and a player in early position made a standard sized raise to $7. The players folded around to the fish who looked down and made a huge raise to $45 dollars . The small blind folded and I looked down at ace queen suited. Now normally I would fold ace queen in this position when faced with a raise and a re raise, but from previously sizing up his play I guessed that he was on what as known as a squeeze play, so I smooth called and the original raiser folded. The flop came Q55. The player who folded, cursed and slammed his hand on the table and got up walking away mumbling. This is very poor etiquette as he basically told me and my opponent that he had either A5 or 55 and had folded a monster. I decided to check and see where my opponent was at, and he came out firing. He bet $300 into a $100 pot, a huge overraise. So I asked myself, did he really pick up aces or kings? Is he trying to bluff me? I figured if he really had aces or kings he wouldn't be trying to blow me off the hand so I checkraised all in for another $1000 dollars. He called quickly and I slumped over in my chair expecting to be beaten. But when he turned over Q7 off my mood changed dramatically. Blanks on the turn and river came and my kicker held up. I dragged a $2700 pot and was ready to get up and walk away but my trout goaded me into staying. He had just over $500 dollars left and judging by the way he was playing I was sure he was ready to give the rest away. So with no real danger to my overwhelming chip stack, and a new rush of adrenaline due to the pot I just dragged, I sat back down and waited patiently for my chance to put him out of his misery. Surprisingly losing that pot seemed to have no effect on him and he started going on an aggressive run again, dragging many pots with terrible starting hands over the next hour. Then he made a huge mistake. With his stack back up to just over $1200 he raised in middle position to $15 (a standard raise for him) With a hand like KQ I normally would fold to such a bet, but because of my competition the call was easy. The rest of the table folded and the flop came Q98. This time he checked over to me, which was an odd play for him as he put in a continuation bet on almost every pot he played. I decided to test the waters and put in a bet of $20 dollars, just over half the size of the pot. He looked at me, glanced back down at his cards and smooth called. The turn came a kind making a board of Q98K. He quickly checked again and with top two pair I came out firing $75 dollars. He seemed to be pondering than put in a minimum raise making it $150, another $75 to me. It was at this point I was worried. This is the type of player that would play his big hands slow and fire huge at no hand at all and here he was making a weak raise like he wanted me to call. Did he slowplay JT? I had to find out. I reraised another $150 back to him and without hesitation he came over the top of me all-in for another $900 dollars more. I was now sure I had been slowplayed and I sat there contemplating. I was very close to folding and I'm sure he knew that because he started talking. Actually, he started barking and growling. Was he really doing what I think he was doing? Did he play the K9 and was he now telegraphing it? "Did that card really help you?" I asked. "Yup" he confidently stated, and I saw no lie in his words. "I don't believe you, I call." He jumped up and slammed K9 down on the table. "I told you that king helped me, donkey!" Instead of showing him my hand and give him the bad news immediately I decided to slow roll and show after the river fell. "We'll just see what the river brings." I stated. A king fell on 5th street and he proudly told the dealer "Send it!" "hang on a second, I have to check my cards again." I slowly looked down at my cards and said "Hey, it turns out that king helped me too." I turned over the nuts and what followed was one of the biggest tirades I have ever seen at a poker table. So big in fact that security had to be called to escort the gentleman out of the poker room. An elderly gentleman that I had been conversating with for hours simply said to me "you know, slow rolling like that is very bad etiquette son." I realized he was right and conceded "I know". "Buuuuut" he added "In that case I think you may have been justified." I smiled and racked up my $4000 in winnings and kindly bid the players at the table farewell and good luck. "see you around, kid" the gentleman said. "You know you will" I replied.

This story is not only an indictment of K9, but bad kickers in general as prolifical can attest. While occasionally you will hit an odd 2 pair that will confound and confuse your opponents, you risk losing a monster pot and jeopardizing your entire stack due to your kicker. These hands have a negative expectation and should be avoided.


coming soon the final chapter....The K9 nightmare scenario
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Last edited by Crackhead Bob; 03-26-2007 at 08:52 PM.
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