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Thread: An epidemic of people getting high off of bath salts?

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    Non Ignorants Eckankar check two's Avatar
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    Default An epidemic of people getting high off of bath salts?

    -Officials fear bath salts are growing drug problem


    FULTON, Miss. When Neil Brown got high on bath salts, he took his skinning knife and slit his face and stomach repeatedly. Brown survived, but authorities say others haven't been so lucky after snorting, injecting or smoking powders with such innocuous-sounding names as Ivory Snow, Red Dove and Vanilla Sky.

    Some say the effects of the powders are as powerful as abusing methamphetamine. Increasingly, law enforcement agents and poison control centers say the bath salts with complex chemical names are an emerging menace in several U.S. states where authorities talk of banning their sale.

    From the Deep South to California, emergency calls are being reported over exposure to the stimulants the powders often contain: mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone, also known as MDPV.

    Sold under such names as Ivory Wave, Bliss, White Lightning and Hurricane Charlie, the chemicals can cause hallucinations, paranoia, rapid heart rates and suicidal thoughts, authorities say. The chemicals are in bath salts and even plant foods that are sold legally at convenience stores and on the Internet. However, they aren't necessarily being used for the purposes on the label.

    Mississippi lawmakers this week began considering a proposal to ban the sale of the powders, and a similar step is being sought in Kentucky. In Louisiana, the bath salts were outlawed by an emergency order after the state's poison center received more than 125 calls in the last three months of 2010 involving exposure to the chemicals.

    In Brown's case, he said he had tried every drug from heroin to crack and was so shaken by terrifying hallucinations that he wrote one Mississippi paper urging people to stay away from the bath salts.

    "I couldn't tell you why I did it," Brown said, pointing to his scars. "The psychological effects are still there."

    While Brown survived, sheriff's authorities in one Mississippi county say they believe one woman overdosed on bath salts there. In southern Louisiana, the family of a 21-year-old man says he cut his throat and ended his life with a gunshot. Authorities are investigating whether a man charged with capital murder in the December death of a Tippah County, Miss., sheriff's deputy was under the influence of the bath salts.

    The stimulants aren't regulated by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration, but are facing federal scrutiny. Law officers say some of the substances are being shipped from Europe, but origins are still unclear.

    Gary Boggs, an executive assistant at the DEA, said there's a lengthy process to restrict these types of designer chemicals, including reviewing the abuse data. But it's a process that can take years.

    Dr. Mark Ryan, director of Louisiana's poison control center, said he thinks state bans on the chemicals can be effective. He said calls about the salts have dropped sharply since Louisiana banned their sale in January.

    Ryan said cathinone, the parent substance of the drugs, comes from a plant grown in Africa and is regulated. He said MDPV and mephedrone are made in a lab, and they aren't regulated because they're not marketed for human consumption. The stimulants affect neurotransmitters in the brain, he said.

    "It causes intense cravings for it. They'll binge on it three or four days before they show up in an ER. Even though it's a horrible trip, they want to do it again and again," Ryan said.

    Ryan said at least 25 states have received calls about exposure, including Nevada and California. He said Louisiana leads with the greatest number of cases at 165, or 48 percent of the U.S. total, followed by Florida with at least 38 calls to its poison center.

    Dr. Rick Gellar, medical director for the California Poison Control System, said the first call about the substances came in Oct. 5, and a handful of calls have followed since. But he warned: "The only way this won't become a problem in California is if federal regulatory agencies get ahead of the curve. This is a brand new thing."

    In the Midwest, the Missouri Poison Center at Cardinal Glennon Children's Medical Center received at least 12 calls in the first two weeks of January about teenagers and young adults abusing such chemicals, said Julie Weber, the center's director. The center received eight calls about the powders all of last year.

    Dr. Richard Sanders, a general practitioner working in Covington, La., said his son, Dickie, snorted some of the bath salts and endured three days of intermittent delirium. Dickie Sanders missed major arteries when he cut his throat. As he continued to have visions, his physician father tried to calm him. But the elder Sanders said that as he slept, his son went into another room and shot himself.

    "If you could see the contortions on his face. It just made him crazy," said Sanders. He added that the coroner's office confirmed the chemicals were detected in his son's blood and urine.

    Sanders warns the bath salts are far more dangerous than some of their names imply.

    "I think everybody is taking this extremely lightly. As much as we outlawed it in Louisiana, all these kids cross over to Mississippi and buy whatever they want," he said.

    A small packet of the chemicals typically costs as little as $20.

    In northern Mississippi's Itawamba County, Sheriff Chris Dickinson said his office has handled about 30 encounters with bath salt users in the past two months alone. He said the problem grew last year in his rural area after a Mississippi law began restricting the sale of pseudoephedrine, a key ingredient in making methamphetamine.

    Dickinson said most of the bath salt users there have been meth addicts and can be dangerous when using them.

    "We had a deputy injured a week ago. They were fighting with a guy who thought they were two devils. That's what makes this drug so dangerous," he said.

    But Dickinson said the chemicals are legal for now, leaving him no choice but to slap users with a charge of disorderly conduct, a misdemeanor.

    Kentucky state lawmaker John Tilley said he's moving to block the drug's sale there, preparing a bill for consideration when his legislature convenes shortly. Angry that the powders can be bought legally, he said: "If my 12-year-old can go in a store and buy it, that concerns me."

    -news.yahoo.com
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesJones View Post
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  2. #2
    Non Ignorants Eckankar check two's Avatar
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    Sorry, could you move this to general chat? I thought I was there.
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesJones View Post
    I like the fat black man on House Of Payne and he's very funny.





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    PRODIGAL SUN Wh0am3ye?'s Avatar
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    Damn, I thought getting high off cough pills and shit was bad, now teens across the nation are gonna be stealing their parents bath salt.



  4. #4

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    kids these days needa just smoke some wed and pop a pill here and there

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    The Tin Man food for thought's Avatar
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    http://www.alternet.org/drugs/152547...27?page=entire


    While its criminal investigations branch has issued a bulletin about troops’ use of a hot designer stimulant and a more recent report by its news service proclaimed a full-blown drug craze within the military, the Air Force has little knowledge of whether or not service members are actually using the synthetic drugs known as “bath salts” and lacks the means to track cases.

    This summer, a front page story in the New York Times warned of “An Alarming New Stimulant, Legal in Many States.” Comparing increased use of bath salts to PCP abuse in the 1970s, the Times offered up examples of people driven to psychotic states by the synthetic recreational drug, including “a man in Pennsylvania who broke into a monastery and stabbed a priest, and a woman in West Virginia who scratched herself ‘to pieces’ over several days because she thought there was something under her skin.”

    “There were some [users of bath salts] who were admitted overnight for treatment and subsequently admitted to the psych floor upstairs,” Dr. Jeffrey J. Narmi of Schuylkill Medical Center in Pottsville, Pennsylvania told the Times. “These people were completely disconnected from reality and in a very bad place.”

    Long before it was front page news in New York, however, the U.S. military was weighing in on bath salts in an internal “criminal intelligence bulletin” that was obtained by AlterNet. Issued by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations and designated “for official use only,” the November 2010 report warns that “outreach and education is needed otherwise the Air Force may see a rise in [bath salts’] popularity among its members.”

    Relying heavily on open source information, the Air Force report asserted that the powdery or crystalline substances, which contain chemicals like mephedrone and methylenedioxypyrovalerone and are often snorted, smoked or injected, “appear to have been designed to circumvent existing drug laws and are potentially harmful.”

    Alongside pictures of packages of “Ivory Wave,” one of the top brands of the drug mentioned by the New York Times, and “Bolivian Bath,” which sports an image of actor Al Pacino holding an M-16 automatic rifle in a scene from the 1983 film Scarface, the Air Force report claims these “legal substitutes for ecstasy, cocaine and amphetamines…are powerful stimulant drugs designed to avoid legal prosecution and are commonly available on the internet and specialty head shops.”

    Released last November, the criminal intelligence bulletin stated that “these substances are legal to possess and distribute in the U.S.” However, in an article for AlterNet, Kristen Gwynne notes that today “[a]t least 28 states have already banned the chemicals in bath salts, and some politicians are pushing for a federal approach.”

    Air Force regulations prohibit the sale, possession or “improper use” of “any intoxicating substance, other than alcohol, that is inhaled, injected, consumed, or introduced into the body in any manner for purposes of altering mood or function,” meaning that the use of bath salts is grounds for a misconduct discharge. (Earlier year, the Air Force began discharge proceedings for 30 airmen from Tinker Air Force Base in Oklahoma as a result of their possession or use of a synthetic form of marijuana known as “Spice.”)

    In a June video report, Staff Sergeant Chris Pyles of Air Force News called bath salts “the latest drug craze affecting service members,” but evidence of this is scant. While the use of bath salts has been cited in connection with a case involving David Stewart, an Army sergeant and Iraq War veteran from Washington State who killed his girlfriend and then himself (and may also have beaten his 5-year-old son to death) in April of this year, there is little evidence to suggest an epidemic of use within the U.S. military.

    Last year, according to figures provided to AlterNet by the Air Force Office of Special Investigations, the agency carried out 532 criminal investigations involving drugs. This year, it has probed 308 drug cases. The Office of Special Investigations does not track cases by substance, so it has no idea whether any of the cases center on the synthetic designer drug. “We can't tell you specifically if any of our investigations involved bath salts,” a spokesperson told AlterNet.

    When contacted by AlterNet, Dejan Dedic, one of the two Office of Special Investigations personnel who prepared the November 2010 criminal intelligence bulletin, refused to say whether or not bath salts had ever been a problem within the Air Force.

    In Gwynne’s article on the designer stimulant for AlterNet, she noted “Media and law enforcement have been quick to stir up panic over the drugs.” The Air Force seems to have joined in, but without any way of measuring whether the “drug craze” they claim is affecting the military has ever been even a modest problem.
    We do it for the people.


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  6. #6

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    seen this shit on 1000 ways to die.

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    big wooly mammoth SKAMPOE's Avatar
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    lmao
    WHOIGHTS

    THE REAL PCP

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    Non Ignorants Eckankar check two's Avatar
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    Skamp gets high off of his turtle's eye drops
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesJones View Post
    I like the fat black man on House Of Payne and he's very funny.





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    SmokeY J-Cee's Avatar
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    so this would fit into that category,people give it good reviews...lol

    http://www.buychargepowder.net/index...product_id=112

  10. #10

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    This stuff isn't actually legitimately bath salt though, it's just mephadrone (or in the US MPVD) marketed and labeled as bath salts to take advantage of a legal loophole.



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    big wooly mammoth SKAMPOE's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by check two View Post
    Skamp gets high off of his turtle's eye drops
    lol

    THE REAL PCP

  12. #12

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    when a certain "bath salt" become illegal the manufacturer can just change the moleculure structure and call it something similar and sell it again.

    ive tried mdpv and its completly shit. you will get a small kick and thats pretty much it, and you are gonna want that kick again so you need to refill every 20 minutes or so. it would be perfect for people that need to study like i did though.

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    The Tin Man food for thought's Avatar
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    Burglar high on bath salts breaks into family's home, puts up Christmas decorations

    Ohio boy comes home to find halls decked, strung-out stranger watching TV
    BY PHILIP CAULFIELD
    NEW YORK DAILY NEWS

    Originally Published: Monday, November 14 2011, 11:39 AM
    Updated: Monday, November 14 2011, 11:39 AM

    Snorting bath salts put one Ohio crook in the holiday spirit, police say.

    Cops in Vandalia, north of Dayton, say Terry Trent, 44, was high on the designer drug when he broke into a family’s home, put up some Christmas decorations and then plopped down on a couch to watch television, local station WHIO reported.

    An 11-year-old boy who lives in the house found the strung-out stranger and called his mother, Tamara Henderson, who was at a neighbor's house.

    She said, "What do you mean a man is in our house? You don't know if he has a gun or if he has a knife?" the station reported.

    Henderson called 911, and Trent was arrested without incident.

    Cops say he was armed with a pocket knife.

    But Henderson suspects the decorating bandit was just looking for a festive spot to soak in his buzz.

    "The candle was lit on the coffee table, the television was on and very loud," she told the station.

    "He had said to [my son] ,'I'm sorry. I didn't mean to scare you. I'll get my things and go.' "

    Trent was charged with burglary and held in a county lockup.

    Cops say he has a history of drug charges.
    We do it for the people.


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  14. #14
    Non Ignorants Eckankar check two's Avatar
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    hahahaha
    Quote Originally Posted by CharlesJones View Post
    I like the fat black man on House Of Payne and he's very funny.





  15. #15

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    hahahhaah

    i know a girl who has tried it, compared it to molly a little, said that people in her town sold em as molly
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