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Thread: When Hip Hop Fans Become The People They Hate

  1. #16
    brolic bearded bastard APOLLO STASH's Avatar
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    "another young rapper getting paid" that's basically the problem, and why hip hop transitioned and what not

  2. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Blunt-head Paco View Post
    "another young rapper getting paid" that's basically the problem, and why hip hop transitioned and what not
    is that a problem though? young black men creating careers that otherwise wouldn't have existed without hip hop? Earning enough money to get themselves and their families out of poverty? Is that really a problem? america is a consumer based country, so if the people want to consume this music, and people are making money off of it, what exactly is the problem?

    Sure the "purists" don't like their precious genre being polluted with music they don't like, but isn't it better than if hip hop really had died out? Then people like DJ Premier wouldn't even have the option of having a radio show, he'd be doing what Buckshot is doing these days.....renting apartments.

  3. #18
    brolic bearded bastard APOLLO STASH's Avatar
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    i'm talking about hip hop. it's a problem for the state of hip hop. for the young black men doing it, absolutely not. from psychological studies, in arguments, usually both the people right. i respect all your opinions man, we're all just different. like G Rap and Soulja Boy lol
    but as a matter of fact, at this point, after thousands of arguments and different opinions and this and that, it honestly doesn't affect me who enters the industry. just as long as the pure, raw, traditional shit has its own community and only that hip hop kind can enter that community. like the underground, as long as it's there, i'm gonna be happy, but about the consumer based point you got me

  4. #19
    Rum Ham ShaDynasty's Avatar
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    Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks On Racks etc.

  5. #20
    Don't grab my jacket dunn Hollow Dartz's Avatar
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    My problem with the new hip-hop is originality. It's lacking. besides that man, I see it like this...hip-hop is like going into a ice cream store......back in the 90's there were only 4-5 different flavors, now today there's 20+. of course youre not gonna like EVERY FLAVOR, but thats why there's different flavors. Just keep buying/listening to what you like, people are gonna get those other flavors regardless, me personally, if im in a ice cream store 7 days a week, 4 of them days i'll get the same flavor, the last 3 days i would switch it up...i hope yall got that one lol peace

  6. #21
    PRODIGAL SUN Taskmaster2112's Avatar
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    The way I see it, the current state of hip hop is a lot like where funk was in the late 70s/early 80s, when disco dominated the mainstream while funk began moving into the underground (with a few notable exceptions, like P-Funk, who mostly kept on doing whatever they wanted to do). Mainstream disco was corporatized and generic, with a lot of the artists being interchangeable with each other and no real innovation. Basically most people were doing what was selling.

    Hip hop in the mainstream has followed a similar course. Back in the 80s and 90s, the best selling artists who got the most exposure were groups like Run-DMC, Wu-Tang, the Death Row cats, etc., and even groups like Brand Nubian and BCC got played on the radio. This is similar to the late 60s through the mid 70s when a lot less "mainstream" funk and soul acts got airplay and exposure and sold well. By the disco era, most of the experimentation and innovation was pushed out of public consciousness, informing the rise of hip hop and leading directly to the stylistic innovations of Run-DMC's first album. Hip hop today has similarly pushed most of the experimentation, innovation, and, well, quality off of the radio and out of the public consciousness (although much like in the disco era, there are some exceptions, like the Roots and the Beastie Boys, who still sell pretty well and get some radio play).

    I wouldn't be surprised if the current state of mainstream hip hop gives rise to some major innovations in the next ten years, much like how disco gave way to hip hop or how the excesses of prog and arena rock in the 70s paved the way for punk.

  7. #22

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    Both Taskmaster2112 and Hollow Dartz made incredible points. Appreciate the input.

  8. #23

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    i'm far from a hiphop head but when I listen to songs by Soulja Boy and songs on the Chronic, I find myself bobbing to the latter and vibing to it. the subject matter may be similar, but there's a flow to the raps on 'nothing but a g thang' for example... and there just isn't on sjb's songs.

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