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Old 11-02-2012, 11:58 PM   #166
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lol, yeah, RZA's acting wasn't anything special.

Still, This is exactly the kind of movie I was expecting. Music was on point.
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Old 11-03-2012, 02:26 AM   #167
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Billy, his real name is Thaddeus point blank, everyone in Jungle Village just knows him as this Blacksmith who was previously a slave. Pam Grier traded her freedom from her plantation owner instead for her son's since he was younger. Something happends & he ends up on a slave boat I believe nicely tieing in with that animated prequel about the boat & Brass Body
Ur Rite i finally, seen it. but it was rumored he'd be name dat in django unchained. the movie as a wu fan i give it 8/10 as a regular dude 7/10
u can tell much was cut, as many have stated. for me the pleasant suprise where the Geminis.
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Old 11-03-2012, 05:32 AM   #168
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saw it last night. experts are predicting a #3 or 4 opening this weekend for about $8.5 million. not bad for a $20 mil budget and a bunch of theaters closed because of the storm.
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:02 AM   #169
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RZA's acting wasn't anything special. He should've just played himself, instead of trying to act....a la Q in his movies. Also, RZA as a narrator wasn't the best of choices because his voice takes you in/out of the story. Masta Killa should've did it.

It's a good movie, great for a first time filmmaker. I enjoyed it and if you couldn't really follow, Jack Knife said it best "for the gold".
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Old 11-03-2012, 08:15 AM   #170
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Supported and caught the late show last night. Wu-Tang Forever!
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:53 AM   #171
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i havnt seen it yet...but i heard there are tons of ester eggs in in it...like stuff from other classic kung fu movies....


most of the reviews i have seen that are bad.,..are people who dont watch kung fu movies or even know any thing about them

but what do i know i havnt seen it yet
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Old 11-03-2012, 10:59 AM   #172
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Was I The Only One Pissin My Panties When the "unpredictable" Beat pops up, during that zen-yi fight.I mite have to watch it again simply cause i diped during the end credits, and there seem to be some TReats in there.
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Old 11-03-2012, 03:23 PM   #173
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Was I The Only One Pissin My Panties When the "unpredictable" Beat pops up, during that zen-yi fight.I mite have to watch it again simply cause i diped during the end credits, and there seem to be some TReats in there.
no doubt!
I do NOT like that version of 'unpredictable', but it was awesome in the movie...and it fit.

music was great overall....even whiz khalifa's singing (which i do not like at all)fit very nice in the film.
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Old 11-03-2012, 03:32 PM   #174
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man i was actually pretty disappointed. i thought they did a terrible job unfolding the story, and then tying the story all together.

my general thoughts......

rza's acting is terrible!!!!!! he should've just been director and found another actor.
rza was also narrator. again, bad choice.

russell was awesome! great acting. super cool.

not much to the story. not told well at all. anticlimactic.

dialogue was pretty sub-par.

stylistically was very nice. good direction overall!
good fight scenes & stayed true to classic kung-fu, but camera was too close too often.

cool characters.

great music! score & sdtrk songs! great ODB placement!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! respect!

i struggle to give it a 5/10.
......and i'm a HUGE rza fan. i'm actually a tad surprised tarantino has his name out front all over this.
despite my feelings, i still am proud i took 2 other people with me to support it on opening night. will always support WU.
i'm also very proud of rza's accomplishment here. this is a HUGE HUGE HUGE step. even if i didnt like the film, i still recognize what rza has done here......going from attempted murder charge in the projects of NY, to making the greatest contribution to hiphop EVER....with the hardest & biggest group of guys imaginable, to hollywood, and now director/writer/star of a major motion picture released throughout the world, with QT's name on it (greatest filmmaker of all time). AMAZING! plus, developing an incredible friend/business network.
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Old 11-03-2012, 04:59 PM   #175
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Was I The Only One Pissin My Panties When the "unpredictable" Beat pops up, during that zen-yi fight.I mite have to watch it again simply cause i diped during the end credits, and there seem to be some TReats in there.


Hey...what do you guys mean..."Unpredictable"???

What version?...the Iron Fists press release says that John Frusciante remixed it for this film...was it any good?
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Old 11-03-2012, 09:09 PM   #176
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RZA should've just stayed behind the camera. his acting and narration didn't work at all. but it was a fun b-movie. critics are taking it too seriously
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Old 11-04-2012, 12:04 AM   #177
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I'd give it a 8 out of 10, probably like a 75/100.

At first it felt real weird because all the characters were speaking perfect english, then i eventually got used to it and really enjoyed it. Gordon Liu absolutely killed it, got goosebumps thinking about how RZA grew up watching Liu as the Master Killer in 36 Chambers now he can see himself on screen training under him.
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Old 11-04-2012, 12:07 AM   #178
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Hey...what do you guys mean..."Unpredictable"???

What version?...the Iron Fists press release says that John Frusciante remixed it for this film...was it any good?
The 8 Diagrams version with Dexter Wiggles. The weaker version.
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Old 11-04-2012, 02:21 AM   #179
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Default RZA: Interview with rollingout.com



RZA never makes a move without careful thought. Moments after walking on to the set for his exclusive photo shoot with rolling out, RZA pulled a chair up to the edge of a chessboard and began playing himself in the strategic game. Before moving each chess piece, he studied the board as if facing a formidable opponent.


Seeing the chessboard from both sides has advantages. For RZA, his solitary chess game wasn’t just to kill time. It was an example of how he approaches life.


”I apply mathematics to my way of life,” RZA revealed when asked about the creation of the Wu-Tang Clan. ”Chess is a game that allows you to think ahead. I had the vision of what I could do with the Wu-Tang Clan. I went back to my neighborhood and got all of my emcee buddies. I told them that if they gave me five years of their life, I could take them to number one. In five years, we were at the top of the charts.”


Indeed, RZA was the mastermind behind the Wu-Tang Clan and the acclaimed solo releases from Ol Dirty Bastard, Method Man, Raekwon, Ghostface Killah and GZA.


The Wu-Tang Clan is one of the most heralded rap crews in rap music history. But RZA was never satisfied with only achieving success in hip-hop.



He wanted to take his vision to another level.


He took the same principles that propelled Wu-Tang Clan to greatness, and applied them to his venture into filmmaking.


This week, RZA’s directorial debut, The Man With the Iron Fists, hits theaters nationwide. A rapper-producer helming a $20 million motion picture might be considered a checkmate in chess terms. But those who have followed RZA’s career since the ’90s, know that this is only an opening move, much like the Queen’s Gambit.



How did the game of chess reflect what you created with the Wu-Tang Clan?
I’m the abbot. Every rapper was like a superhero. I watched the cartoon ”Voltron.” All of the Voltron lions are powerful by themselves. But when you form Voltron, that’s when the Defender of the Universe comes down and pulls out the blazing sword. I applied that concept to us. I applied the chessboard. One of our first videos was ”Chess Boxing.” In that video, it was me and GZA playing chess and members of the Wu-Tang were pieces on the chessboard.
Brothers played their position[s] throughout the course of our rise in hip-hop. My only rule was that it had to be a dictatorship. With the notoriety, there was competition at times but they still followed my ideas. Things almost got physical at times. In the beginning, it was so tight that one member got a deal and it helped another member get a deal.

Everyone has an idea for a film. How did you make it a reality?
Foresight is important. I had a five-year plan for myself. No one knew about it except my wife and I. I went to Quentin Tarantino, who became my mentor. I was his student. I went to film festivals and was on the set of Kill Bill. I took some of my own money and filmed a movie called ”Wu-Tang vs. The Golden Phoenix.” I had a chance to taste what it would be like. I studied books and script writing for five years. After five years, I wrote my first screenplay. It was good, but it wasn’t great. I pitched it to Eli Roth and he helped me flesh out the ideas to make it bigger. I learned from him and it led to 130 pages and we took it to the studio. The studio saw an artist. They were impressed by the idea. Most production studios believe that a rapper would make another Boyz N the Hood or movie about where he grew up. I wanted to take hip-hop to another level when I made this film.

What was Quentin Tarantino’s role?
He’s on board as a producer. The thing about kung fu films is that they are big on an international level. But we don’t really get many of those films in the U.S. We wanted to separate from the 50 other films that are made internationally. We added Quentin Tarantino and he’s the master. But after Kill Bill, no one filled that void. I’m looking to fill the void with The Man With the Iron Fists. If it’s done properly and we’re accepted by the public, there is an audience that will come see films like this every year.

If you created a kung fu film based on five fierce women, who would you choose as your leading ladies?
Lucy Liu has a natural knack for action films. Zoe Saldana did a great job in Columbiana. She’s very agile and beautiful. Scarlett Johansson … did a good job with The Avengers. I would bring in Pam Grier to be a godmother who could tell the young ladies what time it is. Jamie Chung — she looks so sexy when she does a side kick. The kick alone is worth the price of admission. I would have a rainbow coalition of beautiful women.



Back to hip-hop, do you think it’s as creative as it was when the Wu-Tang Clan first came on the scene?
I think the creativity is there. You have artists like Wiz Khalifa, [who] harmonizes with his raps, Young Jeezy has a crazy voice, Rick Ross also has an immaculate voice. Drake has good lyrics and his own style. He’s not a thug, but he makes good music.


The creativity is there, but there is a lack of knowledge of self. A lot of the young brothers in rap don’t have a clue about what the future is going to bring, because they have no knowledge of who they are to see ahead.



Before you do anything, you should understand what you are doing. That’s different in our culture. You have a generation that learned hip-hop from watching TV. A lot of them didn’t actually walk the streets like the pioneers. Some brothers want to be rappers because it’s a moneymaking thing. We did it out of love. We woke up wanting to rhyme, but we also had a hunger for knowledge. In New York, before we formed the Wu-Tang, you would see book peddlers all over the city. There would be cyphers. The first cyphers weren’t about rapping or a battle. It was about brothers coming together [and] dropping the day’s mathematics and giving lessons.


I remember talking to Kanye West about it. He’s a focused brother. I got inspired by that. But I let him know the importance of his position and giving people something to aspire to. Because one spoon of chocolate can change a glass of milk.
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Old 11-04-2012, 07:27 PM   #180
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Default RZA: From Wu Tang to Kung Fu


We can't think of anyone living a cooler life than Robert Fitzgerald Diggs, aka RZA. As founding member and leader of seminal hip-hop collective Wu-Tang Clan, RZA established his production cred and incredible genre-hopping sensibilities in the early '90s. After becoming a Grammy-winning producer, he took his first step into the film world by composing the score to Jim Jarmusch's 1999 Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai. When Quentin Tarantino approached RZA about orchestrating the soundtrack to Kill Bill: Vol. 1, RZA's fate was sealed. He embarked on a samurai journey with Tarantino, observing and learning everything he could from the director. After seven years in the making, RZA is finally presenting to the world The Man With the Iron Fists. Co-written with Eli Roth and directed by RZA, the film is a love letter to the various influences that have inspired him since he was an eight-year-old kid growing up in Brooklyn—namely, hip-hop and 42nd Street grindhouse kung-fu flicks.

Starring Russell Crowe and Lucy Liu, and featuring a hilarious breakout performance by Byron Mann as the head villain Silver Lion, the film contains all the gonzo violence, animal-themed clans, and scantily-clad women you would expect from a RZA movie. It's also a ton of fun. Interview caught up with RZA to discuss his tutelage under Tarantino, the evolution of Iron Fists, and what would be on his perfect triple-feature movie bill.


DREW FORTUNE: What was your first love, the music or the movies? I assume both were great escapes?

RZA: Music came first. I actually heard hip-hop before I saw a movie in a movie theater. I heard hip-hop first, at the tender age of seven, so that came first. I didn't see a movie until I was eight.

FORTUNE: Did you make an automatic connection between the two, in the sense that you could see how both fit in the other's world?

RZA: No, I didn't see that. I didn't discover how music and film could work together until Jim Jarmusch had me do Ghost Dog. When I think of my album, I was trying to make an audio movie. I didn't know that these two things had such a poetic wavelength that went together until Ghost Dog.

FORTUNE: When did you first put pen to paper on The Man With the Iron Fists? Do you remember when the first spark of an idea hit?

RZA: I first put pen to paper in the year 2005. I probably came up with about 90 pages by myself, trying to write a screenplay. I didn't know all the nuances of a screenplay, but I had a story that I saw clearly in my head. I was able to tell that story to my buddy Eli Roth, and he saw it clear in his head. He said if he ever had the chance to help, he would. When the chance came for him to help, he reached out and said "Hey Bobby, you still got that thing? Do you want to get it done?" He came on, and we sat down for about a year and half and wrote it out to a proper screenplay.

FORTUNE: Did you feel pressure throughout the process of adding to this kung-fu legacy that you love so much? Or was the motto, "Let's just have fun?"

RZA: The pressure came when I had so many people and so many A-listers in my hands. I had to deliver them safely to a location that I promised. So I was basically super-focused, and that was the pressure. I had a passion to write and make the film. It was something I wanted to do. Even writing the first 30 pages, spending the whole year with Eli toning it up into a proper screenplay; that was all done with no money. We weren't being paid to do it. It was being done as passion. Most things that come out good, in the beginning they have to have a strong passion. Wu-Tang Clan's first album, 36 Chambers, there wasn't a lot of money given to make that album. There was a lot of passion to make that album, and this is the same thing.

FORTUNE: You took a samurai/sensei journey with Tarantino. Like any good sensei, did he make you prove your commitment to the project?

RZA: I don't know, exactly. I never really questioned him about it. All I know is that I asked him, he said yes, and I showed up, yo. I took it serious, and he took it serious. I was never in his way. I was a fly on the wall. He never saw me breathing down his throat. When he wanted to show me something, he'd say "Hey Bobby, come take a look at this," and we'd both look through the lens. It was a really good energy, and we were kindred spirits.

FORTUNE: In terms of directing and choreography for Iron Fists, did you feel confident going in? There's a lot of action going on.

RZA: Before we started filming Iron Fists, I had already spent my own money and brought in some other great Asian actors. I brought in Robert Tai, who was the fight choreographer on Five Deadly Venoms. I brought him in for a couple weeks and filmed some stuff with my own money. I showed Eli and my producers what I could do and what I know. The action was no problem for me. I saw a lot of it in my head, though. My action director didn't want to do some of it! He thought it wasn't logical. I'm like, "No. It's logical."

FORTUNE: Did you have to physically draw out the stuff you saw in your head?

RZA: I had two storyboards, with over 150 pages storyboarded. If you see the storyboards, it's like 20 comics. We had to cut out a lot of the storyboard scenes, because the budget would never allow some of the stuff that I wanted to do.

FORTUNE: Did the MPAA come down on you at all? Did you have to be reeled in a lot?

RZA: No, I was conscious of it, because Quentin told me a lot about the MPAA. Eli told me the problems he had with them. So I was conscious of it. The best thing I had on this project, and I'm very grateful, is having Eli and Quentin there as a co-pilots. So, when I got to landmines, I had somebody there who had already stepped on one. "No Bobby, that's a landmine right there. You gotta jump over this one. You gotta be calm and just go through it."

FORTUNE: What's the hardest part of directing? As a natural collaborator, I assume working with the actors came pretty easily.

RZA: [laughs] The hardest part is lunch. You don't ever get your lunch, man. There's no sitting down as a director. Your brain does not turn off, even when you want it to. People told me about it, and I didn't believe it until it happened to me. You work 12-13 hours a day, go home to your hotel room, and guess what? You're fucking up five more hours, thinking about what you're gonna do the next day.

FORTUNE: Am I crazy, or was Bryon Mann's performance as Silver Lion inspired by Prince?

RZA: Well, Byron Mann did a screen test that was so cool. He didn't originally try out for Silver Lion. He tried out for Poison Dagger. But his screen test was so fucking cool that I wanted him to be Silver Lion. He blew me away. The odd thing was to have him evolve into this weird type of guy. With his hair, I can see the Prince in him, I can see the Rod Stewart, and I can see the motherfucking Tina Turner in him. Quentin told me that he thinks I found his star. When I saw him, we had already cast somebody else as Silver Lion. It was a guy who played a lot of roles in kung-fu movies. He already had the part, but would you believe that at the last minute, this guy came back and tried to double his money. He tried to fucking extort me. We already had a deal. I had already seen Byron's screen test, so I was like, "If this guy wants to break the deal, let him break it. Byron is incredible, and I'd love to have this guy." I remember pulling Eli aside and saying, "Fuck it. I already got my Christoph [Waltz]. I got a guy that's gonna break out like Christoph." Even my wife, who saw the movie for the first time at the premiere, was like, "Yo. Fucking Silver Lion. I love that guy!"

FORTUNE: In the movie, the Pink Blossom brothel is a 24/7 party. Did any of the onscreen debauchery translate to an offscreen party?

RZA: The set was concentrated and super focused. But we did have two parties, one in the middle and one at the end, and my Asian brothers know how to party. We got so drunk and had a good time. We had a party with about 700, 800 people. That's how big my crew was. It was really a beautiful thing, man. I'm so happy to be inspired by the Asian culture and these movies and then be able to go back and give back by bringing a movie to them, and have people on my payroll and bringing actors from their culture to the silver screen in America. It's been a blessing for me.

FORTUNE: If you were to plan your perfect triple feature, what would be on the bill?

RZA: I'd put Five Deadly Venoms on the bill. I'd put Kill Bill on there as well. I'd top it off with The Man With the Iron Fists, as of now. These are the ones where I'd be like "Yo, you gotta see these. These are a great collaboration of kung-fu and samurai movies." Five Deadly Venoms will set you up into the world and take you back to the classics. If I could do a fourth one, I'd do 36 Chambers, of course. Kill Bill shows you the animation, as well. I wrote a big animation scene for Iron Fists, but we couldn't afford all that. Kill Bill captures the anime, Japanese, and kung fu. Iron Fists captures the kung fu, the sci-fi, the Star Wars, the comic books, and the hip hop. So, that's the way I would do it for this year. Next year, who knows?
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